EPL

Tottenham striker Troy Parrott signs new contract

By Sports Desk February 07, 2020

Tottenham striker Troy Parrott has signed a new contract with the Premier League club.

The 18-year-old, who had entered the final 18 months of his deal, has now committed his future to Spurs until 2023.

Parrott has made two senior appearances for Spurs since progressing through the academy, with his Premier League debut coming against Burnley in December.

The Republic of Ireland international was linked with a move away from north London during the January transfer window, with Charlton Athletic and ADO Den Haag reportedly having shown interest in taking the forward on loan.

However, Spurs were reportedly eager to keep him so he could qualify for the Champions League B list as a homegrown player - something he achieved when he turned 18, having joined Spurs from Belvedere on his 16th birthday.

With Harry Kane set to miss most of the rest of the season with a hamstring injury, Parrott had been tipped to break into Jose Mourinho's first-team plans, although the Spurs boss said last month that he did not think the player was ready for such responsibility.

"I think he has potential," said Mourinho. "I think he needs to work a lot. He has a process to go through, a process that probably [Japhet] Tanganga had. One thing is 17 and another thing is 20. We are speaking about three years of distance and three years.

"Okay, in Tanganga's case it was three years without a Premier League match, but it was three years of working and playing, playing in his age groups, playing in the England [youth] national team, which also gave him some experience. Then with me it was just the last part of his preparation before he had his first opportunity.

"I think Troy has to go through a process. Can he have minutes? Yes, he can have minutes. I'm not saying he's not able to have minutes but, to put on his shoulders the responsibility of replacing somebody to be replaced, I don't think he's ready at all."

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