Man United offer free travel to Astana for fans affected by Thomas Cook collapse

By Sports Desk November 01, 2019

Manchester United are offering a free flight to Astana for this month's Europa League match for fans whose travel plans were disrupted by the collapse of Thomas Cook.

The travel firm, which folded in September, were commercial partners with a number of Premier League clubs including the Red Devils.

United say Thomas Cook Sport had pre-sold some travel packages for the match with Astana in Kazakhstan on November 28, with the club taking action to offer fans alternative arrangements.

A club spokesperson said: "We have been working through a range of contingency plans to minimise the impact of the Thomas Cook situation for our supporters.

"We are pleased to be able to confirm that Manchester United will be operating a complimentary trip to the forthcoming match against FC Astana in Kazakhstan for those who were impacted by the insolvency of Thomas Cook.

"Beyond the Astana fixture, we are investigating longer-term options around facilitating European travel for our loyal fans."

United took seven points from their first three Europa League group games, beating Astana at home and Partizan Belgrade away in between a 0-0 draw at AZ.

 

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