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The Laver Cup has been postponed by a year after French Open organisers controversially moved their grand slam to dates that clashed with the team event.

Roger Federer, whose management runs the Laver Cup, said he would compete at the 2021 Laver Cup which will be held from September 24 to 26 in the US city of Boston.

Federer, a record 20-time grand slam winner, will be 40 years old by the time the delayed event comes around.

Boston was due to stage the Laver Cup this year from September 25 to 27, but French Open chiefs last month declared their postponed tournament would switch from May to a September 20 start.

The move by Roland Garros chiefs caused ructions in the tennis world, and the Laver Cup has been a casualty, conceding it was "inevitable" it would have to make way.

Laver Cup chairman Tony Godsick said: "We needed to make a decision now on our event.

"We know our passionate fans will be disappointed that they have to wait an extra year for the Laver Cup in Boston, but this is the responsible course of action, necessitated by the emerging calendar conflicts."

Federer said: "It's unfortunate that the Laver Cup has to be pushed back a year, but at this stage it's the right thing to do for everyone concerned."

The coronavirus pandemic has put the tennis season on hold, with no events to take place before mid-July. Wimbledon has been cancelled and August's WTA Rogers Cup event in Montreal has also been called off.

Laver Cup chiefs pointed in their statement on Friday to the French Open's decision and said since that came on March 17 they had assessed the situation along with stakeholders Tennis Australia and the United States Tennis Association, and the ATP, which runs the men's tour.

The statement said: "Ultimately though, the international tennis schedule precluded the ability of the organisers to stage the event and therefore there was no reason to delay the inevitable decision."

Team Europe, including Federer and Rafael Nadal, won the 2019 Laver Cup by beating Team World in Geneva.

US Open organisers plan to make a decision in June about staging this year's tournament - but it is "highly unlikely" to go ahead behind closed doors.

The coronavirus pandemic has caused both the ATP and WTA seasons to be halted, while the remaining grand slams scheduled for 2020 have also been affected by the health crisis.

While the French Open was switched to a date later in the calendar - the clay-court event will now begin on September 20 - Wimbledon has been cancelled.

The main draw at Flushing Meadows is due to start on August 31 and the United States Tennis Association (USTA) are still hopeful play will be possible, though much will depend on how the situation develops in the coming weeks.

"Time is on our side at this point as the last grand slam," USTA chief of operations Mike Dowse said on a conference call, according to the New York Post.

"Obviously our ambition is to run the tournament. Having said that, it won't be the driving factor. The driving factor is the health and well-being of our players, fans and staff.

"We've set a time frame about June to make that decision."

On the possibility of no fans being present, Dowse said: "Playing without spectators – we're not taking anything off the table – but it's highly unlikely.

"It's not really in the spirit of the celebration of tennis. We really don't see that as an option.

"Unless the medical experts come back with a foolproof way of doing a safe tournament without fans, we may look at it at that point."

Rafael Nadal and Bianca Andreescu are the reigning US Open singles champions.

Rafael Nadal would jump at the chance to play competitive tennis behind closed doors, after admitting he struggled to handle the onset of the coronavirus crisis.

The 19-time grand slam winner is sidelined at home in Mallorca and has predicted the tennis tour will remain on hold for a long time to come.

Nadal says public health is the most important matter, but he revealed in a radio interview on Wednesday that he has been speaking to Novak Djokovic about how tennis recovers.

Speaking to radio station Cadena Cope in a Red Cross fund-raising broadcast, Nadal said: "I am dealing with quarantine better than three weeks ago, the human being has the capacity to adapt.

"In the beginning, the terrible news made me sad and took away my desire to wake up, all day watching TV and there was nothing positive. As days went by, I came back to my routines, with double sessions every day to keep fit.

"I came back from [the cancelled ATP Tour event at] Indian Wells on a Wednesday and that Saturday the state of alarm was official. It was a shock. Knowing what was happening in Italy, I knew it was coming to Spain.

"In Indian Wells I was sleeping [at the home of] the tournament owner, who is a very connected person, and at his house I was prevented from hugging anyone and was keeping distance."

The tennis season is on hold until mid-July at the earliest, with Wimbledon cancelled and the French Open postponed until a September start.

Nadal, a record 12-time Roland Garros champion, turns 34 in June.

He said: "I am not worrying about tennis now. I do physical work to not deteriorate my body.

"Tennis is not like football, our sport involves more travelling. Until there is [a] cure, the situation will be really complicated. We need to be responsible.

"I cannot see an official tournament at short or medium-term.

"Health comes first. But if it would be possible to play behind closed doors, I would be very happy. I have talked many hours with Novak to see how we can help our sport."

Serbian Djokovic, who won his 17th grand slam at this year's Australian Open, is spending the quarantine period at his Marbella home.

He also spoke to the radio station, and stressed he would not want a decision to resume the tennis tour to be taken in haste.

Djokovic, who has his 33rd birthday in May, said: "Tennis behind closed doors? It depends. It is not an easy decision. It is bigger than our sport, this decision.

"I am ready to play, but this will come in the next months. I am lucky to be with my family. Normally we are always travelling."

Matteo Berrettini still gets goosebumps when he thinks about being complimented by Roger Federer.

Despite starting 2019 outside the top 50, Berrettini ended the year with a place in the ATP Finals as the world number eight.

Titles in Budapest and Stuttgart, an appearance in the final in Munich and a run to the US Open semi-finals proved key to the Italian's remarkable ascendancy.

His impressive rise did not go unnoticed by Federer, who praised Berrettini's performances when they were in action at the Halle Open.

The 20-time major champion offered more words of encouragement when their first on-court meeting ended in Federer triumphing 6-1 6-2 6-2 in the fourth round of Wimbledon.

Berrettini told Stats Perform: "Before Wimbledon I played Stuttgart and Halle. I won Stuttgart whose defending champions was Federer.

"In Halle I met him and he complimented me. Before we only exchanged some hellos but to be complimented by him still gives me goosebumps.

"We didn't speak during Wimbledon because we were in the same half of the draw, so no tips. But then he told me: 'Congratulations for your grass season. Go on like this and you will go high.'

"Then we met again in London for the ATP Finals. He was very kind because we chatted during the famous boat trip from the hotel to the arena. We chatted about the holidays and his plans.

"The relationship with all of them is so weird. I grew up looking up to them, you know. But the relationship is good, they are special."

Berrettini will not get to continue his development on grass this season with the whole swing, including Wimbledon, cancelled due to the coronavirus.

The 23-year-old is disappointed he will not get to play at the All England Club, having gained a greater affinity for the surface following his displays in 2019.

"Without a shadow of a doubt, Wimbledon is my favourite slam. I reached the US Open semis but I regard Wimbledon as the temple of our sport," said Berrettini.

"I always say that in this place even people who are not experts or passionate about tennis, go there and get keen to be participating and playing. It is wonderful and its cancellation is very tough for us.

"It is a peculiar situation. It is on grass and in England where the weather is mostly rainy, they can play only in certain dates. They can't move it to November because in London it would be five degrees. That's why the cancellation.

"Until last year, though, my relationship with grass was not ideal at all. But since the Davis Cup tie in India, everything changed for me.

"Maybe I improved in some aspects, but I didn't even realise at the end of the season I had played many high-level games on that surface and now it is one of my favourite."

Tim Henman believes the enforced break from tennis could help Andy Murray, saying he hoped the Brit had "a few Wimbledons left in him".

Wimbledon was cancelled this year for the first time since World War II due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Murray was said to be nearing a return from a hip injury, having last played at the Davis Cup Finals in 2019.

Henman feels the break could be beneficial for two-time Wimbledon champion Murray, who turns 33 in May.

"He has missed so much tennis but perhaps [the break] will give him the opportunity – if his body and his hip enable him – to play longer, in age terms," he told UK media, via The Guardian.

"I remember playing with Agassi after Andre had 18 months out, for very different reasons, but he came back fresh and invigorated to play. He kept going until he was 36.

"In those days that was old for a top tennis player. I stopped when I was 33 and that was pretty old at the time, but with training techniques and injury prevention, players are certainly playing longer.

"You would like to think that if Andy's body permits and he still has the motivation that I think he does there can still definitely be a few Wimbledons left in him yet."

A player who appears closer to the end of his career is Roger Federer, with the 20-time grand slam champion turning 39 this year.

Henman – an All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club (AELTC) board member – said the Swiss great, who underwent knee surgery in February, would be shattered by the cancellation of Wimbledon.

"Someone like Federer, coming to the end of his career, is devastated but understands the decision," said Henman, a four-time Wimbledon semi-finalist.

"It will affect a lot of people in a lot of different ways."

ATP chairman Andrea Gaudenzi said there were "50 calendar options" for this year, but admits tennis could be one of the last sports to resume.

The ATP and WTA Tours have been suspended through July 13 amid the coronavirus pandemic.

While Wimbledon was cancelled, the French Open was pushed back until September amid uncertainty over when, and if, play will get underway in 2020.

Gaudenzi said tennis may have to wait longer than other sports to resume due to the amount of travel.

"We have 3,000-4,000 people coming from all over the world and therefore tennis could be one of the last sports to return," he told Sky Sport on Friday.

"We have 50 calendar options. Nothing is yet decided. We will make decisions late May.

"There are assumptions [like] playing on the red clay after the US Open if all goes well and then continue with the normal season – in Asia, indoors and close with the [ATP] Finals in London."

There have been more than 1.6 million cases of coronavirus worldwide, with the death toll exceeding 102,000.

Novak Djokovic again showed he is a match for an Andy Murray challenge - even in a lockdown.

The Serbian has had the better of their tennis head-to-head record, even if his 25-11 winning record includes defeats to the Briton in finals of the US Open and Wimbledon.

With on-court rivalries on hold while tennis endures a hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic, Murray looked to add a touch of spice this week when he challenged ATP and WTA stars to take part in a '100-volley challenge'.

Murray and wife Kim strung together an impressive century, and on Friday came filmed proof that men's world number one Djokovic had also reached the target with his wife, Jelena.

Spending more time than usual at home, the pair donned sports gear in their yard and showed impressive shared skills, before Djokovic appeared to hit their tennis ball over a wall once the hundred volleys were complete.

He kissed his wife on the hand, and said: "Thanks Kim, thanks Andy, for challenging us.

"If you've got any more challenges, we're here, we're available, we've got all the time in the world, this is the funnest part of the day. See you, guys."

On Instagram, where Djokovic posted the video of the volley exchange, the 17-time grand slam winner jokingly described it as "too easy".

Roger Federer challenged celebrities and fans to join in a volleying drill on social media on Tuesday.

With the ATP Tour suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic, the 20-time grand slam champion looked to engage fans on social media.

In a video posted on Twitter, Federer – wearing a panama hat – volleyed a ball repeatedly against a wall at close range, and asked others to do likewise.

"Here's a helpful solo drill. Let's see what you got!" the Swiss great wrote.

"Reply back with a video and I'll provide some tips. Choose your hat wisely #tennisathome."

Many fans took up the challenge, with Federer replying to several efforts.

Nick Kyrgios has vowed to help anyone who has fallen on hard times due to the coronavirus crisis by delivering food to their doorstep.

Australian world number 40 Kyrgios on Monday took to Instagram to offer his support for those struggling during the COVID-19 pandemic.

He wrote: "If ANYONE is not working/not getting an income and runs out of food, or times are just tough...please don't go to sleep with an empty stomach.

"Don't be afraid or embarrassed to send me a private message. I will be more than happy to share what I have. Even just for a box of noodles, a load of bread or milk.

"I will drop it off at your doorstep, no questions asked."

Unemployment is expected to soar in Australia following as a result of such unprecedented times, with businesses forced to close.

Kyrgios also played a huge part in raising funds for the bushfire crisis in his homeland earlier this year.

Australian Open semi-finalist and German star Alexander Zverev suspects he contracted coronavirus in December.

COVID-19 has wreaked havoc across the world, with more than 69,300 deaths globally and sport brought to a standstill.

All ATP and WTA tournaments have been called off until mid-July, with Wimbledon cancelled, due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Zverev produced his best grand slam performance at the Australian Open, where he reached the semi-finals in January, and the 22-year-old believes he may have been infected prior to the year's opening major in Melbourne.

"My friend Brenda and I were in China on December 28," the world number seven told Bild.

"You can't imagine how I coughed for a month in Australia. I had a fever for two or three days and I coughed for five or six hours. Brenda too. We didn't know what it was. It was a cough that I never had. I had no pain, but I coughed continuously every 10 seconds.

"I had no pain, but I coughed continuously every ten seconds."

Juan Martin del Potro was "still nervous" as he watched a replay of his US Open final win over Roger Federer in 2009.

The coronavirus pandemic has brought sport to a standstill around the world, with many broadcasters opting to show classic matches from the past.

Del Potro, whose career has been ravaged by injuries, won his only grand slam 11 years ago, beating Federer in a five-setter in New York.

On his Instagram story on Saturday, the Argentinian was watching a replay of his 3-6 7-6 (7-5) 4-6 7-6 (7-4) 6-2 victory.

Del Potro wrote: "[It's] 11 years later and I'm still nervous."

Del Potro, 31, was last in action in mid-2019 before needing surgery on his knee.

The ATP and WTA Tour seasons are suspended until at least July 13, with Wimbledon having been cancelled for the first time since World War II.

Could Rafael Nadal return to tennis in an all-Spanish series of tournaments before the global ATP season swings back into action?

That was the possibility raised on Saturday by a report that indicates the Royal Spanish Tennis Federation (RFET) hopes to put on a domestic men's tour to enable the country's top players to build match fitness.

Spanish sports newspaper Marca said it had learnt, through RFET sporting vice-president Tomas Carbonell, that plans were in the works for between eight and 10 tournaments to take place at clubs and academies in Spain.

They would feature the country's leading players, open to those in the top 100, including world number two Nadal.

Nadal on Saturday released an Instagram video showing how he and sister Maria Isabel are passing the time during lockdown, playing patio tennis over a couple of garden chairs.

All ATP and WTA tournaments have been called off until mid-July, with Wimbledon cancelled, due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The French Open has been controversially postponed from May until late September, starting just a week after the US Open wraps up.

Nadal has triumphed a record 12 times at Roland Garros and would not want to go to Paris short of match practice, which may mean domestic competition could appeal to the 19-time grand slam winner.

Spain's next-highest ranked men's player is world number 12 Roberto Bautista Agut, followed by Pablo Carreno Busta (25) and Albert Ramos-Vinolas (41).

Marca reports the prospect of a Spanish tour would hinge on the mid-season hard-court swing, including the US Open, being cancelled.

The decision to push the French Open back to September amid the coronavirus pandemic was rushed and selfish, Pablo Cuevas has said.

Last month the French Tennis Federation announced the tournament will begin at Roland Garros on September 20, having originally been scheduled to take place from May 24.

The new date would see the competition start a week after the US Open in New York comes to an end. 

It was a move met with widespread criticism and Cuevas, the world number 60, is bemused by the change, considering the impact it will have on players.

"I think the Roland Garros decision was a bit rushed, perhaps without asking the ATP from what I know," the 2008 French Open men's doubles champion told Stats Perform. 

"Also, it seems they didn't take into account the rest of the tournaments, the rest of the calendar, it was something weird.

"Even more in this moment of solidarity, where we must have solidarity, it was something pretty selfish to go forward and set the dates without having any concern for the players and the rest of the calendar. All the players were a bit surprised."

While there is still a chance the French Open could be held this year, Wimbledon will not be on the 2020 calendar.

The All England Club this week cancelled the tournament, marking the first time since World War Two that the grass-court grand slam will not take place.

"About the cancellation of Wimbledon, I think it was something pretty obvious," Cuevas added.

"This [coronavirus] is being more serious that what it seemed at the beginning, it's taking a lot to control it, so I think it was a good decision made by the people at Wimbledon."

Cuevas expects it to be a long time before life on the ATP and WTA Tours - which are both suspended - can return to normal.

He said: "We don't know yet when we'll be able to compete again. It's one of the earliest sports to cancel everything and I think it will be one of the latest to get back because of all the nationalities involved.

"Every country must free every airport and flights, so they have to control the pandemic, so that will make us get back after other sports. I don't know when we'll be able to start."

Rafael Nadal was told by Bill Gates in February that the coronavirus would become "complicated", according to the Spanish great's uncle Toni.

The coronavirus pandemic has brought sport, including tennis, to a standstill around the world, with Wimbledon cancelled for the first time since World War II.

Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer played in the Match in Africa in February and Toni said the 19-time grand slam champion was warned about coronavirus by Microsoft co-founder Gates.

"When my nephew was playing in South Africa in February, he spoke to Bill Gates and he told him that what was happening in China was going to get complicated," Toni Nadal told Onda Cero on Thursday.

The Mallorca Open, of which Toni Nadal is the tournament director, is among the events to have been postponed due to coronavirus.

Toni Nadal hopes the tournament can still be held in 2020, saying: "It is not permanently suspended.

"It will try to find new dates to see if it can be done in 2020."

Andy Murray has expressed his sadness that Wimbledon has been cancelled but says health and safety must be the priority amid the coronavirus crisis.

The All England Lawn Tennis Club on Wednesday confirmed that the grass-court grand slam, which was due to start on June 29, will not go ahead for the first time since World War II.

That announcement had been expected due to the spread of COVID-19, which has killed more than 46,000 people worldwide.

Murray, a two-time winner of his home major in London, had hoped to make his latest return from a hip injury in Miami last month but it remains to be seen when he will make another competitive comeback.

The former world number one is naturally disappointed he will not play at SW19 and Queen's Club this year, yet he knows organisers had no alternative.

He posted on Facebook: "Very sad that the Fever-Tree Championships and Wimbledon have been cancelled this year but with all that is going on in the world right now, everyone's health is definitely the most important thing!

"Looking forward to getting back out on the grass next year already! Hope everyone is staying safe and healthy. #StayHomeSaveLives."

The ATP and WTA announced the suspension of their tours had been extended until July 13, but US Open organisers say the tournament will go ahead as scheduled as it stands.

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