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Professional tennis returned behind closed doors on an indoor German clay court on Friday - with a Wimbledon cult hero playing a leading role.

Dustin Brown brought the Wimbledon Centre Court crowd to their feet with a stunning win over Rafael Nadal five years ago, his flamboyant game winning a legion of fans.

However, the dreadlocked German-Jamaican had no spectators to impress at the Tennis-Point tournament, played at Germany's Base Tennis Academy in Hohr-Grenzhausen, a small town found between Cologne and Frankfurt.

In the round-robin phase of the eight-man tournament, Brown secured a 4-2 4-2 win against fellow German player Constantin Schmitz.

The ATP and WTA tours have seen all tournaments through to mid-July postponed or cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic.

But the Tennis-Point series of three exhibitions, with its best-of-seven-game sets, is expected to be the first of a host of non-tour events to be staged.

The first match on day one of the event saw Benjamin Hassan beat Jean-Marc Werner 4-2 4-2.

With international travel severely restricted, the Tennis-Point events are featuring players based only in Germany, but there are similar plans for tournaments elsewhere, notably in France, where Serena Williams' coach Patrick Mouratoglou has proposed staging matches, and Spain.

Two events will be held on private courts in Florida later this month, it was announced on Friday, with top-20 stars Matteo Berrettini and Alison Riske among those playing.

Friday's matches were played in a cavernous indoor venue, with an umpire but no ball boys or ball girls or line officials.

The red clay court was surrounded by advertising boards, reflecting the fact the match was being shown by a specialist tennis broadcaster.

It was tennis, yet not tennis as we know it given the sterile environment.

The esteemed Dutch coach Sven Groeneveld, who has worked with players including Maria Sharapova, Monica Seles and most recently Sloane Stephens, said the match "referee" picked up the balls without wearing gloves at the end of one match.

He also observed a change of protocol, writing on Twitter: "Nice to see the interview after match but no handshake or recognition of thanks towards opponent nor the referee! Maybe bowing like in japan would be a nice gesture of thanks!"

Andy Murray has pledged the winnings from his Madrid Open Virtual Pro triumph to the NHS and the tennis player relief fund.

The Briton, a two-time winner of the real Madrid Open, beat David Goffin in the final of a computer game version of the tournament on Thursday.

Murray prevailed 7-6 (7-5), having received a semi-final bye after opponent Diego Schwartzman suffered a "connection issue".

He received $45,000 (£35,700) in prize money and posted a celebratory message on Instagram to confirm he would give it to charitable causes.

Posing with a large bottle of Moet champagne, the former world number one wrote: "Going to get 'virtually' legless celebrating my win online @mutuamadridopen.
 
"Hope anyone who watched got some sort of enjoyment out of it in these tough times.
 
"I'll be donating half of the 45 thousand dollars prize money to the NHS and the other half to the tennis player relief fund."

The NHS is on the front line of the battle against coronavirus in the United Kingdom, while the tennis player relief fund has been set up to help ease the financial worries of players lower down the rankings, with the sport on hold.

The latter is not a cause that has been met with universal approval, with world number three Dominic Thiem voicing his opposition by saying he "would prefer to donate to people or institutions that really need it".

World number one Novak Djokovic hopes the ATP Tour resumes soon, having struggled mentally during the coronavirus pandemic.

The ATP Tour has been suspended until at least July 13 due to the COVID-19 crisis, which has killed more than 228,000 people globally.

Wimbledon will not go ahead for the first time since World War II, while Djokovic has not taken to the court since winning a fifth Dubai Tennis Championships title in February.

"Officially it is July 13, but they have already cancelled the WTA tournament in Canada [Rogers Cup], but not the male one," the 17-time grand slam champion told Sky Sport Italia.

"We have to see how the situation is in the United States, because that's where we'll be going in August. If it becomes less risky, we can start again.

"There is also the option of cancelling all tournaments in America and starting with clay in the autumn, maybe go to Rome in two or three months. I hope we can start playing again."

Djokovic, who won a record-extending eighth Australian Open crown in February – added: "For us tennis players it is important to have clarity in the schedule. Officially it is July 13, many say it is unlikely we will start again on that date.

"It is important for me to have a routine, I cannot wait for a date. I train every day in the gym, I run at home, I play with the children and this is also a struggle.

"At first I was a little empty mentally and in confusion, I lacked clarity. I spoke with my team, I tried to train daily, even if I didn't follow my preparation to the letter."

World number one Novak Djokovic has revealed he considered quitting tennis 10 years ago.

Djokovic won his first grand slam at the Australian Open in 2008, having lost to Roger Federer in his maiden major final appearance at the US Open the previous year.

By the time the Serbian arrived at the French Open in 2010 he had 17 ATP Tour titles to his name.

But he had lost four of his five major meetings with Federer and been beaten in his four grand slam contests against Rafael Nadal – the two players who were ahead of him in the rankings.

It was Jurgen Melzer who sent him packing from Roland Garros that year, though, as the Austrian 22nd seed battled back from two sets down to claim a shock victory.

It was a defeat that left Djokovic questioning his future in the sport.

"In 2010 I lost to Melzer in the quarter-finals of Roland Garros. I cried after being knocked out. It was a bad moment, I wanted to quit tennis because all I saw was black," Djokovic told Sky Sport Italia.

"It was a transformation, because after that defeat I freed myself.

"I had won in Australia in 2008, I was number three in the world, but I wasn't happy. I knew I could do more, but I lost the most important matches against Federer and Nadal.

"From that moment I took the pressure off myself, I started playing more aggressively. That was the turning point."

Djokovic has gone on to win 17 major titles and become the first player to taste success at all nine ATP Masters 1000 events.

One of his greatest achievements came at Wimbledon in 2019, when he defeated eight-time champion Federer in an epic that concluded with a tie-break after the pair were locked at 12-12 in the fifth set.

"It was one of the two most beautiful matches I've played, along with the final against Rafa in Australia in 2012. They are unique matches, everything happened," said Djokovic.

"From a technical point of view, Roger's game quality was excellent from the first to the last point – the numbers show that.

"I played the decisive points well, I didn't miss a ball in the three tie-breaks and maybe that was the first time in my career.

"These matches happen once or twice in a career and I am grateful to have been able to fight against a great like Roger in a prestigious arena like Centre Court at Wimbledon."

Andre Agassi reached plenty of milestones in his illustrious tennis career and the eight-time grand slam champion had another to celebrate on Wednesday.

The legendary American has turned 50, which is hard to believe as it does not seem long since he was gracing the courts as one of the great crowd pleasers.

Agassi won 60 ATP Tour titles during a 21-year professional career, making a whopping $31,152,975 in prize money.

The flamboyant former world number won all four majors before retiring at the 2006 US Open.

We reflect on the former world number one's grand slam triumphs and wish him many happy returns.

 

Wimbledon, 1992

It was the unlikely setting of Centre Court where the Las Vegas native's major breakthrough came.

Agassi's early successes were on hard and clay courts, but he came from behind to beat Goran Ivanisevic in five sets to be crowned Wimbledon champion at the age of 22.

US Open, 1994

Agassi's first grand slam title on home soil came at the expense of Michael Stich.

Still sporting long flowing locks that he later revealed to be a wig, Agassi became the first unseeded champion since Fred Stolle back in 1966 with a straight-sets victory over the German.

Australian Open, 1995

He started the 1995 season on a high note, moving just one title away from completing a career Grand Slam at Melbourne Park.

Minus his hairpiece, Agassi added another piece to the jigsaw by seeing off old foe Pete Sampras 4–6 6–1 7–6 (8–6) 6–4 to win the Australian Open.

French Open, 1999

Injury and personal issues led to a fall from grace for the sporting icon, who plummeted to 141st in the rankings.

You cannot keep a good man down, though, and he became only the fifth of eight men to complete a clean sweep of majors by coming from two sets down to beat Andriy Medvedev in the final at Roland Garros 21 years ago.

US Open, 1999

A second US Open title followed in the final major of 1999, a golden year for Agassi in which he started dating Steffi Graf - whom he married two years later.

Compatriot Todd Martin was the latest player to suffer at the hands of Agassi, who was taken the distance again before sealing a 6–4, 6–7 (5–7) 6–7 (2–7) 6–3 6–2 win.

Australian Open, 2000

Agassi got his hands on the Australian Open trophy for a second time five years after his first triumph in the opening major of the season.

The top seed dethroned defending champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov in four sets in the championship match. Agassi would have held all four grand slam titles at the same time if he had not lost to Sampras in the 1999 Wimbledon final.

Australian Open, 2001

He was also the master in Melbourne 12 months later, proving to be a cut above Arnaud Clement.

Frenchman Clement was unable to live with a relentless Agassi, who was in seventh heaven after easing to a 6-4 6-2 6-2 victory.

Australian Open, 2003

Agassi withdrew from the 2002 Australian Open due to a wrist injury, but he was back to regain the title a year later.

He lost just five games in a one-sided final versus Rainer Schuttler, winning what proved to be his final grand slam title at the age of 32. 

Roger Federer stands above any tennis player in history, according to fellow former world number one Andre Agassi.

Federer beat Agassi in four sets in the final of the 2005 US Open – the sixth grand slam of a career tally that now stands at 20.

Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic have closed the gap on the Swiss great, with 19 and 17 to their respective names.

Tennis' ongoing hiatus amid the coronavirus pandemic could compromise the prospects of Federer, now 38, adding to his overall haul, having last tasted slam glory at the 2018 Australian Open.

Six years ago, Agassi declared Nadal to be the best of all time but, in an interview with Bild, he reverted to the position he held after being bested by Federer at Flushing Meadows.

"Federer, without doubt," he said. "Nobody stood out from their opponents on the court as much as he did.

"I don't think [I would have had a chance against him at my best]. I played against him in the final of the 2005 US Open. I won a set – more was not possible."

Nowadays, Agassi admits he struggles to take a set off his wife and fellow tennis great Steffi Graf.

"She always wins," he added. "She has this healthy ambition. 

"It's also easier for Steffi to stay in shape than for me. She gets up in the morning, does sports and doesn't even have to think about it. 

"Everything looks so easy with her."

World number three Dominic Thiem is standing by his opposition towards a relief fund for tennis professionals affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Novak Djokovic, the world number one and president of the ATP player council, has championed a plan to assist players outside the top 250 on the men's tour who are unable to earn income while tournaments cannot go ahead.

The proposal, backed by Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, would see leading players encouraged to pay more into the fund than those who are ranked far lower and provide multi-million-dollar relief to those whose income has all but disappeared with the suspensions of the ATP and WTA Tours.

Thiem, a three-time grand slam singles finalist, expressed concern to Kronen Zeitung over donating money to certain players who "don't give everything to sport" and said he would prefer to give support to "people or institutions that really need it".

The 26-year-old accepts his comments came across as harsh but insists he would rather know exactly where his money was going rather than contributing to a general fund.

"There are just a few things that bother me about the whole thing," he said to Sky Sport Austria.

"I don't want to back down from my opinion that there are some players I don't want to support. I'd much prefer it to be chosen by the players themselves because then those players who really need it and who really deserve it will benefit.

"What I said came across as a bit strong. I didn't say it so strongly.

"There'll always be people, animals, organisations who need support much more urgently than probably every single athlete."

The ATP Tour is on hold until at least the middle of July, with Wimbledon having been cancelled and the French Open moved back to September.

However, with lockdown measures in Germany having lately been eased, localised tournaments taking place under strict protocols have been mooted as a way to ease players back into action.

Thiem is in favour of these small-scale competitions against fellow Austrian or German players, having realised how long it will take to recapture top physical form when he practiced back on a court this week.

"I couldn't believe what sore muscles I had the day after," he said. "I couldn't believe that a movement you've done practically all your life could cause so much pain the next day or the day after.

"It'd be a small but great step back into competitive tennis. There are really good players in Austria and Germany with whom you could have great matches."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

Andy Murray joked Rafael Nadal should not be a "bad loser" after handing him a pasting at the Madrid Open Virtual Pro before urging patience for the real tennis tours to return.

Murray and Nadal had each come through their virtual openers on Monday but it was the Briton who came out on top in their duel, dropping just one point in a 3-0 win.

After their online contest, Murray gave a fist pump to the camera while Nadal gave a quick thumbs up before hastily logging off.

In a post-match interview, Murray said: "If you speak to Rafa, tell him not to be such a bad loser next time!"

On his chances of winning the whole thing, he added: "I think I have a chance, for sure."

Murray later defeated Denis Shapavolov to reach the quarter-finals unbeaten, while Nadal suffered another defeat to Benoit Paire.

Three-time grand slam winner Murray was later quizzed about the challenges facing global sports amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Tennis has been heavily affected with the ATP and WTA Tours postponed until at least mid-July, while Wimbledon was cancelled for 2020 and the French Open rescheduled for September.

Some have predicted that neither tour will recommence this year and Murray says public health and the return of normal day-to-day activities must take precedence over sport's return.

"I'm sure all tennis players want to get back to competing and playing as soon as possible. But right now that is not the most important thing," Murray said.

"First of all, we want to get our normal lives back, just being able to go out, see friends, go to restaurants and have your normal freedoms. 

"And then hopefully over time things will start to allow for travelling and sport will be able to go back to normal as well. But I don't see that happening very soon. 

"The first thing is to try and find a way to stop the virus spreading and once we've done that we'll be able to do more and more normal things rather than thinking about competing in sport. 

"A lot of people want to watch sport again, so obviously the athletes and the players want to be competing. 

"It's entertaining and it's something that lots of people enjoy. When you don't get to see it for a while, people realise how much they love playing and watching it.

"But just because it's difficult not to have sport just now doesn't mean we have to speed things up. 

"Let's just focus on getting our normal lives back first and hopefully then all of the countries can sort out the virus properly. 

"I'm obviously no expert on this but I assume the danger is when you go back to trying to do things too quickly like avoiding social distancing and then if we get back to international travel, then maybe there could be a second wave of infections and that maybe that would slow everything down again. 

"That's not what anyone wants. Let's just try and get things back to normal first and then we can think about playing sport again."

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