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JC always confident of turning tables on STATHS insists coach Ferguson

By Sports Desk November 29, 2019
Jamaica College coach Davion Ferguson. Jamaica College coach Davion Ferguson.

A confident Davion Ferguson, coach of triumphant Manning Cup champions Jamaica College, insists the team was always confident of turning the tables on St Andrew Technical (STATHS) a team that defeated them just two rounds prior.

 For the second consecutive match in a row Jamaica College were perfect from the penalty spot, after failing to find the goal against STATHS in regular time.  Just as they had against Kingston College in the semifinals, JC managed to turn the tables on a team that had gotten the better of them earlier this season. 

In the quarterfinal round, it was STATHS who triumphed 2-1, when it counted most it was JC who managed to repeat the result of the 2017 Manning Cup final to claim an unprecedented 30th title.  Despite heading into the final as slight underdogs Ferguson insists the team was always confident of getting revenge on their opponents.

“We were very confident.  We re-watched the video from the first game, and I believe I can say publicly that tactically we got that wrong, but we assessed ourselves and we came back here,” Ferguson said.

“We should have won it in 90 but in penalties, it was sweet the same,” he added.

“When set out in June to accomplish this and we did.  These boys are champions and it’s just tremendous.”

 

 

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