Steve Smith receiving a sickening blow from a Jofra Archer bouncer on day four of the second Ashes Test jabbed at painful memories of Phillip Hughes' tragic death for Australia coach Justin Langer.

Lord's was enraptured by a gripping passage of Test match action as Smith sought to stand firm in face of a ferocious barrage from debutant England paceman Archer.

Having worn a lifting delivery on the forearm, Smith was left prone on the turf when he ducked into an Archer bouncer, prompting immediate concern.

Australia opener Hughes died after being struck on the back of his neck during a Sheffield Shield game in November 2014. David Warner, Travis Head, Nathan Lyon, Mitchell Starc and Brad Haddin – all members of the Australia touring party – played in that match at the SCG.

"You never like seeing your players get hit like that," Langer told a news conference. "There's obviously some pretty rough memories of a blow like that. So there's no fun in it."

Smith appeared frustrated to have to leave the field after a lengthy medical assessment but, after coming through concussion tests, he returned when Peter Siddle was out caught behind to Chris Woakes.

The same bowler removed Smith for 92 – comfortably the most significant contribution to Australia's 250 all out before England closed on 96 for four, a lead of 104.

"As soon as he got up in the medical room he was saying, 'I'm going okay'. The doctor said he had passed the concussion tests," Langer explained.

"As soon as he got back in the dressing room he was ready to go back out there again. These are like my sons. You're never going to put them in harm's way.

"He said, 'I can't get up on the [Lord's] honours board unless I'm out batting'. All he was concerned about was that he wasn't going to play his forward defence because his arm was hurting for his top-hand grip.

"I asked him privately two or three times and in front of the group and he said, 'All good, coach'. What else do you do?"

Langer also paid tribute to a spell of fast bowling for the ages from Archer.

"I've got massive admiration for Jofra. I think he's an unbelievable athlete and an incredibly skilful bowler," he said.

"Test match cricket is hard work but his endurance was outstanding today – his skill, his pace. What an athlete and what a great player to have to promote Test cricket.

"To bowl 29 overs today, time will tell if it has an impact. We hope it does, like we do with all the England bowlers, like they would with our bowlers."

Australia will look to extend their 1-0 lead in the five-match series on Sunday but could have been in an even stronger position, having failed to review two lbw appeals against Rory Burns and the still-unbeaten Ben Stokes that would have gone in Nathan Lyon's favour.

"It's frustrating, there's no doubt about that," Langer added. "It can change a session, it can change a Test match, it can change a series.

"We're aware of it and we have to get better at it."

Steve Smith braved a ferocious spell and a sickening blow from Jofra Archer to put Australia in a strong position heading into the final day of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

Smith was unable to make it three centuries from as many innings in the series but the circumstances of this knock mean it might arguably live longer in the memory.

Once again anchoring the Australia innings and bringing up his half century after Matthew Wade edged the in-form Stuart Broad (4-65) to slip, Smith was subjected to a brutal going over from Test debutant Archer (2-59).

He needed padding and a bandage after the paceman whacked him on the left forearm before Lord's held its breath when a bouncer speared into Smith's neck and left him prone on the turf.

Australia's talisman left the field as a precaution but returned to fall for 92 in 250 all out, eight shy of England's first innings total.

England toiled early in their second innings, with Jason Roy (2), Joe Root (0), Joe Denly (26) and Rory Burns (29) all falling, and they closed on 96-4 with a lead of 104.

Burns pouching Wade for six in the morning session underlined the impression Smith was playing a different game to the rest of his colleagues in the Australian order, although his successor as captain Tim Paine (23) provided able support in a stand of 60 for the sixth wicket.

Paine fell to a short-leg catch by Jos Buttler off Archer, setting the stage for day four's exhilarating and frightening centrepiece.

Smith dropped the ball just short of Buttler from a delivery that clocked a remarkable 96.1 mph and he misjudged another vicious bouncer in Archer's next over to cause instant concern.

The medical advice to leave the fray appeared to displease Smith but he was back after Peter Siddle edged Chris Woakes (3-61) behind - the England all-rounder trapping Australia's main man in front after three more defiant boundaries.

Pat Cummins added a useful 20 and promptly got among England.

Roy's ordeal at the top of the order continued as he shovelled back a return catch before Root feathered a beauty behind first ball.

The hosts were reeling on 9-2 at that stage, leaving Burns and Denly to rebuild while riding their luck – both in terms of Australia's laxed review policy and David Warner's uncertain evening in the cordon.

Siddle took matters into his own hands with a return catch to claim the deserved scalp of Denly before having Burns caught behind.

Ben Stokes – afforded further lives by the errant Warner – and Jos Buttler did not always convince but were unbeaten on 16 and 10 respectively when rain brought a slightly early close.


EVENING ERRORS PREVENT AUSSIES FROM DRIVING HOME THE ADVANTAGE

Warner's toils with the bat at the hands of Broad so far in the series transferred to some shoddy work at slip as England tottered. Twice Paine failed to call for reviews that would have seen Nathan Lyon dismiss Burns and Stokes lbw. Both factors could prove costly in the final analysis of a rain-affected and low-scoring encounter.

ARCHER PROVES HE BELONGS

Where England's World Cup heroes have largely failed to fire with the bat since white ball switched to red, Archer left no doubt over his credentials with a spell for the ages. The rangy speedster taking on Smith truly was an "I was there" moment for all in attendance.

MOMENT OF THE DAY

After the thrill and concern of his joust with Jofra, there was a gladiatorial quality to Smith returning to the fray.

Dan Biggar gave "special thanks" to JJ Williams after his man-of-the-match display in Wales' 13-6 win over England.

A cruciate knee ligament injury to Gareth Anscombe during last weekend's defeat at Twickenham thrust Biggar into the number 10 shirt – prompting former Wales great Williams to state his country would not win the forthcoming World Cup with the Northampton Saints fly-half in the team.

But Biggar kicked a penalty and a conversion, the latter coming courtesy of him brilliantly creating the only try of a low-scoring contest for George North as Wales edged ahead of New Zealand at the top of the world rankings.

"Special thanks to JJ Williams for his comments this week, it's been really motivating," said Biggar, as quoted by BBC Sport.

"The forwards were brilliant all day - England's strength is in the set piece, to front up and keep a world-class team try-less is an excellent effort.

"We go to Turkey for a week to hopefully get better for the two Ireland games."

Captain Alun Wyn Jones lauded Biggar's display and the wider achievement of his side, who overcame Liam Williams withdrawing due to a tight hamstring in the warm-up.

"Ten is a position in Wales that has always been in vogue. Fair play to Dan, he stood up knowing the pressure was on him at home," said the veteran lock.

"We are a team of 3.3 million so we can be happy with [being world number one]."

Wales coach Warren Gatland told Channel 4 he was impressed with his players' character during a contest that wasn't always easy on the eye.

"It was a proper Test match, it was tough, it was physical," he said.

"I said to the boys in the changing room, we showed massive character and big cojones. We lost Williams just before kick-off.

"Other teams are going to beat us at some stage, but if you're going to beat us you have to play pretty well."

George Ford captained an experimental England line-up and was responsible for the visitors' entire points haul.

"It's a disappointing result [but] I can't fault the effort, the commitment was brilliant again," he told Channel 4, before concurring with Gatland's assessment.

"We just need to tidy a few areas up - discipline and the breakdown.

"We knew Wales were going to come back. We wanted to play a better game this week too. That was a proper Test match - physical, not much time and space.

"It's been good for us to play in a stadium like this with the roof closed, so we'll keep working."

Ford added: "I don't think many people will remember these games. What happens at the World Cup in a few weeks' time will be completely different so we'll be ready for that."

Steve Smith suffered a major Ashes injury scare when he was struck on the neck by a 92.4mph short ball from Jofra Archer in a dramatic afternoon session at Lord's.

Australia's star batsman retired hurt on the advice of team medical staff before returning to action at the fall of the next wicket, as he chased a third successive century.

But Smith did not last long, advancing from 80 to 92 before being pinned lbw by Chris Woakes.

Australia were soon all out for 250, meaning England led by eight runs.

Smith was attempting to become just the fourth man to make three successive hundreds in one Ashes series, and the first since Arthur Morris for Australia in 1947.

He was back at the crease barely 45 minutes after taking the heavy blow, just below his left ear, that knocked him off his feet.

Archer's delivery had missed the protection provided by Smith's helmet and grille and left the 30-year-old in clear discomfort, although it was unclear whether he was disorientated once he got to his feet.

Despite having been applauded off the field, he faced boos from some spectators on his return to action, an apparently ignorant response to what had been a deeply worrying moment for both teams.

Cricket Australia explained Smith had been cleared to resume his innings, in a statement reported by Cricinfo that read: "Steve was hit on the neck below the left ear. He was assessed lying on the pitch at the instructions of team doctor Richard Saw.

"Dr Saw made the precautionary decision to remove Steve from the field of play to have him further assessed under Cricket Australia’s head impact protocol. Steve then passed his assessments and will now be monitored on an ongoing basis, as is routine."

Just minutes before his bouncer struck the Australia talisman, Archer had bowled a 96.1mph delivery at Smith, which he fended off. Smith was also struck by Archer in a previous over when the batsman was rapped on his left arm as he ducked for another bouncer from the Test debutant.

Smith made two centuries in Australia's emphatic victory in the first Test at Edgbaston but was out just before he reached three figures this time when Woakes broke through his defences. He sought a review, but his body language showed Smith was expecting to walk.

Archer had taken the only previous wicket to fall in the session when he had Australia captain Tim Paine caught, bat-pad, at short leg by Jos Buttler for 23.

Woakes had Peter Siddle caught behind by Jonny Bairstow, which led to Smith's return.

Smith hit three boundaries before England finally found a way to dismiss him for a double-figure score, with Nathan Lyon following later, lbw to Jack Leach, and Pat Cummins caught behind off Broad.

Former England skipper Michael Vaughan condemned the booing of Smith, saying on Twitter that his efforts had been worthy of an ovation.

Australia batsman Steve Smith retired hurt after being hit by a short ball from England's Jofra Archer in the second Ashes Test.

The former captain was 80 not out when he was caught by a 92.4mph delivery from Archer that struck him beneath his left ear, missing the protection provided by his helmet and grill.

Smith went down and looked to be in trouble, lying on his back in initial distress, with team medical staff appearing to instruct him to come off the pitch.

He got to his feet and there was no external sign of a major injury, but with concussion a possibility it was prudent of Smith – who had pulled Archer for four in the previous delivery – to take the advice of the medics.

The former captain was applauded off as he departed for further examination.

Just minutes earlier, Archer had bowled a 96.1mph delivery at Smith, which he managed to fend off.

Smith was also struck by Archer in a previous over when the batsman was rapped on the arm as he ducked for another bouncer from the England bowler, who is making his Test debut.

Smith made two centuries in Australia's emphatic victory in the first Test at Edgbaston.

Wales moved to the top of the world rankings for the first time in their history with a 13-6 win over England in Cardiff.

Eddie Jones' side denied the Grand Slam winners that distinction with a 33-19 victory at Twickenham last weekend but that result was avenged during a largely uneventful pre-World Cup encounter.

George North scored the only try as Dan Biggar proved instrumental to Wales' win – a timely answer to the criticism from former Wales and British and Irish Lions great JJ Williams this week, who said his country would not win the World Cup with the Northampton Saints man at fly-half in the wake of Gareth Anscombe's cruciate knee ligament injury.

All the points acquired by an experimental England line-up came from George Ford's boot, with Ireland awaiting Jones' men next weekend.

An error-strewn opening from both sides contributed to there being no score until the 26th minute, with Biggar slotting over a close-range penalty after England crept offside at the end of a rumbling 13-phase move.

Wales' number 10 was integral to the sole try of the match, stabbing a quick penalty out to Josh Adams following Anthony Watson's yellow card for a deliberate knock-on.

England were unable to reset and another superb Biggar kick switched play to the left for North to touch down.

Watson returned from the sinbin at the start of the second half, as did scrum-half Willi Heinz after getting the all-clear from a head-injury assessment, and the visitors resumed on the front foot – a quickfire pair of Ford penalties trimming the deficit.

Leigh Halfpenny, who was a late inclusion at full-back after Liam Williams withdrew due to a tight hamstring in the warm-up, was off-target with an attempt from halfway.

Watson was hauled down six metres from the line as a blistering England attack own the right had Wales scrambling – Biggar's huge hit on Maro Itoje preceding an offside call in the hosts' favour.

Five minutes from time a successful Halfpenny long-ranger closed out victory and knocked New Zealand off the top of the World Rugby standings, despite the All Blacks' 36-0 routing of Australia to seal the Bledisloe Cup at Eden Park earlier on Saturday.

Australia batsman Steve Smith retired hurt after being hit by a short ball from England's Jofra Archer in the second Ashes Test.

The former captain was 80 not out when he was caught by a 92.4mph delivery from Archer that struck him beneath his left ear, missing the protection provided by his helmet and grill.

Smith went down and looked to be in trouble, lying on his back in initial distress, with team medical staff appearing to instruct him to come off the pitch.

He got to his feet and there was no external sign of a major injury, but with concussion a possibility it was prudent of Smith – who had pulled Archer for four in the previous delivery – to take the advice of the medics.

The former captain was applauded off as he departed for further examination.

Just minutes earlier, Archer had bowled a 96.1mph delivery at Smith, which he managed to fend off.

Smith was also struck by Archer in a previous over when the batsman was rapped on the arm as he ducked for another bouncer from the England bowler, who is making his Test debut.

Smith made two centuries in Australia's emphatic victory in the first Test at Edgbaston.

Steve Smith was frustrating England again on day four of the second Ashes Test as Australia made inroads into the hosts' first-innings total.

Former Australia captain Smith made centuries in both innings of the first-Test hammering at Edgbaston and passed his half-century at Lord's on Saturday.

With rain having washed out the final two sessions of Friday's play, England were seeking quick wickets against an Australia team who resumed on 80-4.

But Joe Root's side made just one breakthrough in the morning, with Matthew Wade going for just six, and Smith (53 not out) was again proving an ominous figure at the crease as Australia reached 155-5, 103 runs in arrears.

Stuart Broad probed well in the first hour and gained a just reward when he tempted Wade into the drive, which yielded a thick edge towards Rory Burns, who took a sharp catch at slip.

There were scarce opportunities for wickets from there, though, as Smith and captain Tim Paine (21no) dug in to frustrate England.

Paine saw out a few testers and settled with a crunching drive through the covers for four off Chris Woakes.

Smith coasted his way towards fifty and brought up the half-century with a clubbing loft over midwicket into an unguarded area of the field, which bounced away to the ropes.

Steve Waugh says Australia must stand by opener Cameron Bancroft "for the long term" despite his tough start to the Ashes.

Bancroft's first three knocks of the series in England have returned eight, seven and 13, while he was the victim of Jofra Archer's maiden Test wicket at Lord's on Friday.

Fellow opener David Warner has also struggled so far, contributing two, eight and three, even though Australia thrashed England in the first match at Edgbaston.

Bancroft, Warner and star man Steve Smith - who made two centuries in Birmingham - are all playing Test cricket for the first time since bans for their role in the team's ball-tampering scandal in South Africa last year.

It is Bancroft, 26, whose position is being questioned at this stage, but Waugh, the team's mentor, is preaching faith in the Durham captain.

"I thought Bancroft hung in there pretty well," Waugh said after Australia ended a rain-affected third day on 80-4 in their first innings, 178 runs behind.

"He just needed to spend another half-hour there, get a few more balls away out of the middle and he would have been right.

"It's a fine line. You can analyse and scrutinise players but that's Test match cricket. Sometimes you are going to miss out. If you pick a guy, you back him for the long term and, right now, we are confident those guys are going to bounce back.

"[Bancroft and Warner] both want to get a lot more runs obviously, but Test match cricket is tough. It's challenging and the conditions over here are not easy for batting.

"It's not as if the ball is coming on and you can play a big cover drive. You have to work really hard for every run.

"And both bowling attacks are world class. You are up against some really quality bowlers who have taken a lot of wickets, have a lot of experience and a lot of know-how, and you've got to work hard for your runs."

In a further defence of Bancroft, Waugh added: "Cameron's preparation for this Test was excellent. He looked really good in the nets and he's pretty relaxed at the moment.

"He'd like some more runs but I am backing him to do well. He's a thoroughly professional cricketer, a nice, decent guy who works hard at his game.

"He's dedicated and he's disappointed he missed out, but he's the sort of cricketer who's tough and he'll come back."

England quick Olly Stone will miss the rest of the 2019 season with injury, his county Warwickshire have confirmed.

Stone, who made his Test debut against Ireland last month, was ruled out of the second Ashes match against Australia at Lord's due to a back problem.

The 25-year-old initially sustained the injury in England's tour of West Indies earlier this year.

Warwickshire ruled Stone out for two weeks following a reoccurrence of the issue in training at Edgbaston, but it has now been announced he will not return this season, meaning he will miss the rest of the Ashes.

"Olly had such a fantastic season in 2018 and looked set to play an important role for England, as well as ourselves this summer, after making his Test debut just two weeks ago," Warwickshire sport director Paul Farbrace said in a statement.

"We're obviously gutted to lose him just over a month after returning to senior cricket.

"Being able to bowl consistently at speeds in excess of 90 mph places huge demands on the body and, with Olly's season having ended prematurely, he will now work our medical and strength and conditioning teams to get stronger and fitter than ever."

England have already been without leading wicket-taker James Anderson due to a calf injury, while fellow fast bowler Mark Wood is out of the Ashes after undergoing knee surgery.

Jofra Archer boosted England by making his Test debut at Lord's this week, dismissing Cameron Bancroft for his first wicket in the format on Friday.

Stuart Broad knows exactly what England must do to beat Australia in the second Ashes Test over the next two days - starting by bowling out the tourists before lunch on Saturday.

England, who were thrashed in the series opener at Edgbaston, recovered a foothold in the second match at Lord's on day three.

Debutant Jofra Archer collected his first Test wicket, while Broad improved his figures to 2-26 as Australia were reduced to 80-4, 178 runs behind in the first innings.

But with Wednesday's first day a washout and play halted just before lunch on Friday, with England in the ascendancy, Joe Root's men are running out of time to level the series in this match.

A draw appears the most likely result, yet Broad is confident he has a plan to defeat their rivals.

"We're pretty positive," he said. "We'd need to bowl Australia out by lunch but there are 98 overs for the next two days and, for both teams, that has been enough to bowl each other out so far.

"There could be an intriguing game left in this Test. So get the wickets by lunch, ideally bat until half an hour before lunch on day five, and then try to force a result that way."

Archer's dismissal of Cameron Bancroft was crucial on day three, and Broad believes the new boy still has much more to offer.

"I don't think Jofra bowled as quick as he can," Broad said. "He showed great control and bowled a nice nagging length.

"I don't think there's any doubt he has the attributes to be a Test cricketer. There are going to be times when he blows teams away.

"It's a big learning experience and he seems willing and keen to learn.

"In our minds, because he's been involved with the World Cup and talked about so much in the last six months, we think he's an experienced, older and knows-it-all cricketer.

"But he's still learning his trade a little bit, although he's doing it with great success."

No further play was possible due to rain after England hit back by taking three wickets in the morning session on day three of the second Ashes Test at Lord's.

England went out under grey London skies on Friday needing to make inroads with Australia, 1-0 up after their victory at Edgbaston last week, 30-1 in reply to 258.

Cameron Bancroft became debutant Jofra Archer's first Test victim before Chris Woakes got rid of Usman Khawaja (36) and Stuart Broad (2-26) saw the back of Travis Head as three wickets tumbled for only 11 runs.

England failed to claim the prized scalp of former captain Steve Smith, but Australia were 80-4 - trailing by 178 - at lunch and poor weather prevented the players from taking to the field again on Friday.

A draw looks the most likely outcome after day one was washed out, but a more positive forecast for the weekend should ensure two extended days are not interrupted, giving both sides hope of forcing a win.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up Australia's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad were unable to conjure an early breakthrough.

England skipper Joe Root persisted with World Cup star Archer (1-18) and the quick got a much-needed maiden Test wicket with a delivery which struck Bancroft (13) in front after nipping in sharply off the seam.

Umpire's call was the verdict after Bancroft signalled for a review and Woakes (1-27) got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade was still there, although yet to get off the mark from 23 balls faced and Smith - scorer of a century in both innings in the first Test - was 13 not out when lunch was called with rain falling, and that was it for the day.

Ruaridh McConnochie's England debut may be delayed further due to him suffering muscle soreness prior to Saturday's encounter against Wales.

The Bath winger had been due to face Warren Gatland's side in last weekend's reverse encounter at Twickenham, which England won 33-19, only to miss out with a hip problem.

Head coach Eddie Jones said McConnochie's issue is not the same as the one that saw him sit out last time around, but his chances of playing at the Principality Stadium are in doubt.

"Ruaridh pulled up a bit sore today so we're not 100 per cent sure how he’ll be," Jones said on Friday.

"We'll find out later tonight. It's not the same injury. He's just sore, so we'll find out about it."

There was better news on the progress of Mako Vunipola, though, with the Saracens prop close to returning from the hamstring injury he sustained towards the back end of last season.

"Mako did a bit of extra work at the end of training today, a bit of contact work. A bit of defence work. He should get some time next weekend against Ireland," Jones added.

Danny Cipriani insists he "can't be disappointed" at being omitted from England's Rugby World Cup squad, despite missing out on a "seven-year" goal.

The Gloucester fly-half was not included in a warm-weather trip to Treviso last month even though he was included in the prior two training camps.

Cipriani has flitted in and out of contention under head coach Eddie Jones in a heated battle for the 10 jersey with Owen Farrell and George Ford.

The 31-year-old's dream of playing at a World Cup is now certainly over having also missed out in 2011 and 2015, but Cipriani is harbouring no ill will.

"I would have loved to be involved in England's Rugby World Cup squad. It has been a seven-year goal with different challenges along the way," Cipriani wrote in his column for The Telegraph.

"But I can't be disappointed because there was honestly no expectation from my side. It was never my right. I never thought: 'Last season went pretty well, I should be picked.'

"All in all, I had two weeks in camp, then a week on my own with my sprint coach Margot Wells after being told I needed the extra conditioning. Then there was one final training session with game-based drills on the Friday, led by Eddie Jones.

"Afterwards, later that afternoon on my way back down to Cheltenham, he rang to say I would not be going out to Italy. Three days later, on the following Monday, I flew to Los Angeles and I have been here since."

It is not known whether Cipriani will make England's injury reserve list, but the Premiership player of the year plans on getting himself in prime condition should an emergency call come his way.

"Eddie has said that everyone needs to be ready and the best way to do that is for me to be the best version of myself at Gloucester," Cipriani said. "I have not been told where I am in the England pecking order, but if the stars align and the call does come at any point, I'll be ready. I felt ready seven years ago."

Jofra Archer claimed his first Test wicket.as England struck three times in the morning session of what was forecast to be a rain-hit third day against Australia at Lord's.

The tourists dominated Thursday's play in the second Ashes Test as they targeted a 2-0 series lead, bowling England out for only 258 and closing on 30-1.

With wet weather expected for the rest of Friday, Joe Root's home side needed to do damage before lunch and duly reduced Australia to 80-4 at the interval.

Debutant Archer removed Cameron Bancroft before Chris Woakes saw off Usman Khawaja (38) and Travis Head fell to Stuart Broad, but England were unable to claim the prized scalp of Steve Smith (13 not), who scored a century in both innings in Australia's win at Edgbaston.

Left-hander Khawaja brought up the team's 50 with a streaky boundary when Woakes was brought into the attack after Archer and Broad struggled early on.

Root persisted with World Cup star Archer and the quick got a much-needed breakthrough with a delivery which struck Bancroft in front after nipping in sharply off the seam, umpire's call the verdict after the opener signalled for a review.

Woakes got in on the act with the second ball of the next over, Khawaja nibbling behind to an excellent delivery which moved away from the left-hander.

Australia were 60-3 after losing two wickets without scoring a run and they were four down when Broad snared Travis Head (7) lbw, England successfully reviewing when Aleem Dar curiously opted not to raise his finger.

Ben Stokes caused an otherwise untroubled Smith problems and Matthew Wade overturned an lbw decision when on nought, after being given out from a ball from the England all-rounder which pitched outside leg stump.

Wade, full of confidence after scoring a hundred in the first Test, was still there along with Smith when lunch was called with rain falling and a strong prospect there may not be any further play on Friday.

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