Warne's baggy green sells for more than one million AUD in bushfire fundraiser

By Sports Desk January 09, 2020
Shane Warne's Baggy Green. Shane Warne's Baggy Green.

Shane Warne's baggy green cap sold for a record 1,007,500 Australian dollars in a fundraiser for bushfire aid in Australia.

Legendary spin bowler Warne auctioned off his iconic baggy green cap – exclusively awarded to Australia's Test cricketers – to raise money for bushfire victims.

Bushfires continue to ravage Australia, where there have been casualties and devastating losses to wildlife with blazes in New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia.

The online auction ended on Friday morning and Warne's baggy green doubled the record amount paid for one of Don Bradman's caps, which went for 425,000 AUD in 2003, with 100 per cent of proceeds to be donated.

Australia great Warne, who is second on the all-time list for Test wickets with 708, tweeted: "Thank you so much to everyone that placed a bid & a huge Thank you / congrats to the successful bidder - you have blown me away with your generosity and this was way beyond my expectations!

"The money will go direct to the Red Cross bushfire appeal. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you."

Related items

  • Skerritt pens heartfelt message about Sir Everton Weekes as part of CWI tribute Skerritt pens heartfelt message about Sir Everton Weekes as part of CWI tribute

    Cricket West Indies (CWI) yesterday paid tribute to Sir Everton Weekes, the legendary West Indies batsman and pioneer. Sir Everton was one of the most significant figures in the history of the sport – as a batsman of the highest quality, he played alongside other forefathers of West Indies cricket for a decade at the international level.

    He was part of the famous Three Ws – alongside Sir Frank Worrell and Sir Clyde Walcott. He was also a highly respected coach, a knowledgeable analyst on the game for the regional and international media, as well as a former Team Manager, Match Referee for the International Cricket Council, and a member of the ICC Hall of Fame.

    He passed away on Wednesday at the age of 95.

    Ricky Skerritt, President of CWI said: “On behalf of CWI I want to publicly express our deepest sympathy to the family of this remarkable Iconic sportsman and gentleman, who passed away earlier today [yesterday]. I also send condolences to former CWI President Sir Wes Hall, and his family, who were all extremely close to Sir Everton. I never had the opportunity to see Sir Everton bat, but I had the opportunity to get to know him a little in his later years. I learned about his incredible career by reading about him and looking at old videos when I could. His performance stats were excellent as he set tremendously high standards for his time.

    Sir Everton was, therefore, a most amazing pioneer in West Indies cricket; a gentleman and quite simply a wonderful human being. I got to spend a couple of hours with him last year just sitting at his home and talking with him, at a time when he was recovering from a serious illness. I have never known a more humble and gentle human being. I grew to appreciate his sense of humour and his love of people and witnessed the love and respect that so many held for him in Barbados and across the entire region. I am so privileged to have known this amazing West Indian Legend and gentleman. Sir Everton Weekes was truly one of the founding fathers of West Indies cricket excellence. May his soul rest in eternal peace.”

    Born, Everton DeCourcey Weekes, he was a member of the famous Empire Club in Barbados, which was also home to several other legends of the game including Sir Frank Worrell, Sir Charlie Griffith and Sir Conrad Hunte.

    He made his Test debut at age 22 against England at Kensington Oval in 1948 under the captaincy of George Headley. His final match was against Pakistan in Trinidad a decade later.

    In his career, Sir Everton played 48 Test matches and made 4455 runs at an average of 58.61 per innings. This included a world record five consecutive centuries in 1948 – scores of 141 against England in Jamaica, followed by scores of 128, 194, 162 and 101 in India. In his next innings, he made 90.

    His average of 58.61 runs means Sir Everton is one of two West Indies greats, along with George Headley, in the top 10 Test averages of all time. This average has been bettered by only four players in history to have scored more than 4000 runs. In all first-class cricket he played 152 matches and scored 12010 runs at an average of 55.34 with a top score of 304 not out.

  • Curran tested for COVID-19 after withdrawing from England warm-up Curran tested for COVID-19 after withdrawing from England warm-up

    England all-rounder Sam Curran was tested for COVID-19 on Thursday after pulling out of the team's practice match in Southampton.

    Curran was taken ill with sickness and diarrhoea overnight and has been self-isolating in his room at the Ageas Bowl.

    A statement released by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) reported Curran was feeling better as the day progressed but would play no further part in the intra-squad warm-up game being played between sides captained by Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler.

    Curran scored 15 not out as Buttler's team posted 287-5 on Wednesday.

    England are training and preparing at their Ageas Bowl "bubble" for the first of three behind-closed-doors Tests against West Indies, a series that begins next week.

    Stokes will captain the hosts as skipper Joe Root attends the birth of his second child, with Curran's participation now a major doubt.

    A left-arm swing bowler who also provides valuable lower-order runs, Curran played all six of England's away Tests in New Zealand and South Africa that comprised their 2019-20 winter schedule.

  • ICC expresses sadness at the passing of Sir Everton Weekes ICC expresses sadness at the passing of Sir Everton Weekes

    The International Cricket Council (ICC) has offered its condolences following the death of former West Indies batsman Everton Weekes at the age of 95.

    In a statement, ICC Chief Executive Manu Sawhney remembered ICC Cricket Hall of Famer Weekes as a top batsman of his era and one whose performances will be long remembered.

    “Weekes is a distinguished name in cricket and he was an integral member of one of the best Test sides ever. We all know of the ‘The Three Ws’ that comprised Frank Worrell, Clyde Walcott and Weekes, and the reputation they had during the 1940s and 50s.

    “His attacking batting contributed in making the West Indies such an attractive side to watch. To be in that team itself was such a big honour, but there were times when Weekes really stood apart with his distinct style. On behalf of everyone at the ICC, I send our sincere condolences to his family and friends,” said Sawhney.

    Weekes played 48 Test matches from 1947 to 1958, aggregating 4,455 runs at an average of 58.61. Known to show quick footwork and fluent stroke-play, Weekes slammed 15 centuries, which included a record five in consecutive innings in 1948.

    One of those centuries came at home against England and four on a tour of India. He almost got a sixth consecutive century but was unlucky to be run out for 90 at Chennai.

    Weekes’s cousin Bam Bam Weekes and son David Murray played international cricket while a few other relatives played first-class cricket.

    Weekes officiated as an ICC match referee in three Tests and four One Day Internationals, all in 1994.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.