Australia's Siddle retires from international cricket

By Sports Desk December 28, 2019

Peter Siddle has called time on his international career after 11 years representing Australia in Test, ODI and Twenty20 cricket.

Veteran bowler Siddle made the announcement prior to day four of the second Test between Australia and New Zealand in Melbourne on Sunday.

The 35-year-old, who was overlooked for the final XI to face the Black Caps at the MCG, decided to call it quits on the international stage following 67 Tests.

Siddle – a member of Australia's triumphant Ashes series in England – claimed 221 wickets at 30.66 after making his Test debut against India in 2008.

The Victorian paceman, who is Australia's 13th highest Test wicket-taker, also played 20 ODIs and a pair of T20s for Australia.

"It's always hard to know when the right time is," Siddle Fox Cricket. "The Ashes was the main goal, to try and get on that touring party and be a part of that series.

"Once I'd ticked that off, I was talking to 'Painey' [captain Tim Paine] and JL [Justin Langer] – I thought I could have done it there, but the chance of getting one last crack if it came in Australia, to [have one more Test] at home would have been nice.

"To think as a young kid I wouldn't get a chance to play, I'm obviously very happy and a bit sad."

Australia head coach Justin Langer said: "The year after I retired from playing, Matty Hayden and Ricky Ponting were raving about this guy called Peter Siddle. If it came from them, you knew it was right and so it proved throughout his brilliant international career.

"He is an unbelievable bloke and an extremely good cricketer. He is the everything of what a team player is. He has given his heart and soul to the Australian team and the game of cricket.

"We'll always be thankful to him for what he's given to the national team, and for the critical role he played in helping us retain the Ashes in England this year. He's going out when he's still playing well which, in a perfect world, is something every athlete wants to do."

Captain Tim Paine added: "Sids has been the heart and soul of the team for a long time. I remember coming up through with him through the academies and even back then he was one of the great team men, something he has continued to this day.

"He has a massive heart and is a fantastic bowler. He'll be very much missed around the group. He's been unbelievably good for our younger fast bowlers over the last 18 months and been a great support for me during that time, as well.

"It's sad to see him leave international cricket, but the time is right for him. He's had a wonderful career, he's achieved a lot and I know he's still got plenty to offer in domestic cricket."

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    Stokes will be the 11th different player to lead England in the 21st century. The last three to take on the job – Root, Alastair Cook and Kevin Pietersen – all started out with victories. 

    Indeed, Michael Vaughan was the last skipper to suffer disappointment on his captaincy debut in the format, losing to South Africa at Lord's in July 2003. He was not aided by Nasser Hussain, the man who had stepped down prior to the match, dropping Graeme Smith when he had eight to his name. The left-hander went on to make 259 as the Proteas triumphed by an innings.

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