Philander angered by umpires' decision on Archer no-ball

By Sports Desk December 27, 2019

South Africa all-rounder Vernon Philander was left frustrated by the umpires' decision to rescind a second no-ball against Jofra Archer.

England paceman Archer – who took two wickets as South Africa were limited to 72-4 at the start of their second innings – finished his day with a pair of beamers, though the second delivery was not given as a no-ball despite apparently being called as one by square-leg umpire Paul Reiffel.

With the umpire at the bowler's end, Chris Gaffaney, having not given a signal for no-ball, however, the officials elected not to make Archer send down an additional delivery.

Both Faf du Plessis and Proteas coach Mark Boucher held discussions with the match officials after the close of play, and Philander, who finished England's first innings with figures of 4-16, was angered by the umpires' decision.

"If you're at square-leg and you call no-ball you've got to stand your ground," he said. "At no time did they actually cancel it.

"For me it's plain and simple: we're playing a game and we're setting an example for the rest of the people coming into this game. You've got to make the right call.

"That's why it's called the purest format. Are we going to tolerate it at another game or are we going to put a stop to it right here? It's in the hands of the umpires."

Archer held a conversation with the umpires after the second delivery, with replays suggesting the ball was dipping towards the bails having passed the batsman at shoulder height. 

"Don't try silly things that can cost you bowling another ball in the innings," Philander, who had no sympathy with Archer, said.

"The umpires have to make a call and hopefully it's the right one for the game looking forward."

Related items

  • Coronavirus: West Indies tour of England agreed 'in principle' Coronavirus: West Indies tour of England agreed 'in principle'

    Cricket West Indies (CWI) has agreed to the Test tour of England "in principle", with players and staff to remain "in a bio-secure environment" for the duration of the series.

    The Windies had originally been due to face England in three Tests, at The Oval, Edgbaston and Lord's, but that series – originally slated to begin next week – was postponed in April amid the coronavirus pandemic.

    However, CWI and the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) have been in discussions about the tour taking place in July at Old Trafford and the Rose Bowl, which have hotels attached to the stadiums.

    That would ensure the travelling party can remain at the same location where Tests would be played behind closed doors.

    A statement from CWI said: "CWI's management is now in the process of seeking to put all of the approvals and logistics in place within the Caribbean, including seeking permission from the various national governments to facilitate the movement of players and support staff, using private charter planes and conducting medical screenings and individual COVID-19 testing for all members of the touring party."

    It has been proposed that the West Indies squad would fly to England in the week beginning June 8, a full month before the opening Test.

    On Friday, England named a 55-man squad which will commence group training sessions, subject to government approval.

  • On this day in sport: Babe Ruth's farewell, Liverpool rock Roma, Tyson topples Thomas and Cook's twin feats On this day in sport: Babe Ruth's farewell, Liverpool rock Roma, Tyson topples Thomas and Cook's twin feats

    Babe Ruth knew time was up on his baseball playing career on May 30 in 1935, but his name lives on and many consider him the greatest player to have swung a bat.

    Liverpool supporters may look back fondly on memories of 1984 at the Stadio Olimpico, where Joe Fagan's team rocked Roma in the European Cup final.

    The brilliant and brute force of Mike Tyson was felt on this day in 1987 by Pinklon Thomas.

    And Alastair Cook, the great England opening batsman, made history not once but twice in successive years on this date.

    Here is a look at those famous moments in sporting history.

     

    1935 – Babe Ruth struck out for the last time

    Nothing that happened in his short spell at the Boston Braves could stain his name, yet Ruth's move from the New York Yankees turned out to be an almighty flop. Arriving in February 1935, Ruth – baseball's biggest draw of the era and a player whose name resonates to this day – offered just glimpses of his glory days. On May 25, he thundered three home runs, albeit in a losing cause against Pittsburgh. That feat took his career haul to a then-record 714 homers, and there would be no more, Ruth playing his final game five days later against the Phillies. At the age of 40, out of shape and a shadow of his former self as a player, Ruth called it quits, his retirement announced days later.

    1984 - Liverpool stun Roma - in Rome

    Liverpool's fourth European Cup, like their fifth 21 years later, came thanks to a penalty shoot-out win against Italian opposition. In 2005, Liverpool had their 'Miracle of Istanbul' against Milan, but in 1984 the English giants had the nerve to beat Roma in Rome, in what was the first shoot-out in a European Cup final. Phil Neal's early strike for Liverpool was matched by Roma's Roberto Pruzzo before half-time and there would be no further goals. Fagan's Liverpool were the team that proved steadiest under pressure in the penalty shoot-out, despite Steve Nicol's early miss. Neal, Graeme Souness and Ian Rush stepped up to score, and after Bruce Grobbelaar's wobbly-legged wind-up routine put off Francesco Graziani, who skied his shot, Alan Kennedy stepped up to fire home and clinch the trophy.

    1987 - Tyson takes down Thomas

    Thomas was a more-than-useful American heavyweight in the mid-1980s, a fighter who had held the WBC belt before and fancied getting it back. The only problem for Thomas was that Tyson owned the belt, and the latter felt it suited him rather better than it suited Thomas. That theory was put to the test on a Saturday night in Las Vegas, and despite Thomas' jab keeping Tyson busy, trouble was soon brewing for the challenger. A thundering left hook from Tyson had Thomas wobbling in the sixth round and was followed by a flurry of punches that sent the 29-year-old to the canvas. Thomas just about managed to get to his feet but trainer Angelo Dundee stepped in, taking his man out of harm's way, Tyson retaining the WBC and WBA titles.

    2015 and 2016 - Cook's England landmarks

    Cook, born on Christmas Day in 1984, was the gift that kept on giving for England. Plucked from the county circuit as a prodigy who already had a double century for Essex against Australia, Cook piled on the Test runs for his country, including a ton on his debut in 2006 against India. On this day in 2015, the then-captain Cook passed his Essex mentor Graham Gooch to become England's all-time leading Test run-scorer during an innings of 75 against New Zealand at Headingley. Not content with overtaking Gooch's mark of 8,900 runs, Cook went on to achieve another May 30 feat 12 months later, becoming the first Englishman to tally 10,000 Test runs. He reached that total on the way to England securing a nine-wicket win over Sri Lanka at Chester-le-Street.

  • Flower backs 'brilliant' Babar to break records but questions captaincy role Flower backs 'brilliant' Babar to break records but questions captaincy role

    Grant Flower expects Pakistan run machine Babar Azam to "break a lot of records" but fears there is a danger he could regret taking over as captain.

    Babar is the top-ranked Twenty20 international batsman in the world and has established himself as one of the best players on the planet in all formats.

    The 25-year-old was named T20I skipper last October and also took the ODI captaincy this month.

    Flower recognised the elegant right-hander was a special talent when he first started working with him as Pakistan batting coach and believes he is destined for greatness.

    He told Stats Perform News: "Babar is brilliant.

    "The first time I saw him play and first time I worked with him - when I threw balls at him at the academy in Lahore - he picked up length so much quicker than the rest of the players and I think that's the hallmark of a great batsman.

    "If you look at some of the best players in the world like Steve Smith, Virat Kohli et cetera, they pick up length really quickly and play the ball late, have a great eye and hand-eye coordination. He has that and I think he is going to break a lot of records.

    "Even in T20 cricket he plays normal cricket shots and that is also the sign of a great player. As long as he stays humble, which I'm sure he will as he's a good bloke, there is no reason why he can't be one of the best and he already pretty much is."

    Sri Lanka batting coach Flower hopes Babar thrives as a leader but fears his form could suffer due to the extra pressure on his shoulders.

    The former Zimbabwe all-rounder said: "He's got a good cricketing brain but there's a lot of politics in Pakistan cricket and a lot of pressure from the public.

    "If you start losing, it's one thing being the best batsman but that will put pressure on your batting skills and it can all come tumbling down pretty quickly.

    "We've seen with great players in the past the pressures that captaincy can bring, but some players get better and if he gets better then the world is his oyster. Time will tell.

    "But he seems pretty positive about it, I read what he said in an interview when he got the captaincy. I wish him all the best and hopefully all positives come with that."

     

    - Grant Flower was speaking on behalf of The Conservation Games, a first-of-its-kind initiative from the Zambesia Conservation Alliance. To watch Grant in action, visit and subscribe to the Conservation Games channel on YouTube.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.