Morgan needs 'more time to think' about England future

By Sports Desk August 16, 2019

Eoin Morgan wants to captain England in next year's Twenty20 World Cup but says he "needs more time" to reflect after a back injury.

Morgan led England as hosts as they won the Cricket World Cup, beating New Zealand in a classic final at Lord's last month.

But his future is uncertain in the aftermath of that success, while he has been battling a back injury that dogged him through the 50-over tournament.

Morgan is keen to continue in the limited-overs leadership role but will first take some time to consider his options, determined he will only captain the side if he is physically fit.

"I need more time to think, that's the honest answer," he told the BBC's Test Match Special. "It's a big decision, a big commitment.

"Given the injury that I went through in the World Cup, I need time to get fully fit.

"I actually need the season to end pretty soon so I can have that time to physically get fit and guarantee that it's not an injury risk between this year and next, and then I'll be able to make a call on that."

Asked if he wanted to skipper the side, Morgan added: "Absolutely. Who doesn't?

"I just don't want to let anybody down. When you lead, you have to lead from the front and you have to be physically fit.

"Finding form is another thing. Hopefully that works itself out."

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