Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

Imran Khan is the allrounder of choice for the SportsMax Ultimate XI One-Day International team, so says a panel of experts and the SportsMax Zone.

The two have combined to pick the current Prime Minister of Pakistan despite significant opposition from Fanalysts.

According to Fanalysts, Jacques Kallis, who finished behind Garfield Sobers in the run-up to the Ultimate XI Test team, is the best ODI allrounder by a long way.

Kallis’ statistics as shown in the Ultimate XI Profiles are impressive. With a 44.36 average with the bat, 17 centuries and 86 half-centuries, as well as 273 wickets at an average of 31.79 with the ball, it is not difficult to understand the fan’s choice.

Imran Khan, on the other hand, averages 33.41 with the bat and 182 wickets at an average of 26.61 with the ball.

The suggestion from the Zone and the panel is clearly they are going for a bowling allrounder with Khan versus the batting bent present in Kallis’ performances.

In fact, Fanalysts do not even have Khan as a serious contender for a place in the Ultimate XI, with Bangladesh’s Shakib Al Hasan, Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi, Australia’s Shane Watson, and England’s Andrew Flintoff, garnering more picks than the famed former Pakistan skipper.

The zone and the panel have continued to play a three-legged race with their voting, so far agreeing on every segment of the XI.

So far, the team of the panel reads Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as openers; Virat Kohli, Viv Richards, and AB de Villiers as batsmen 3-5, Mahendra Singh Dhoni as the wicketkeeper, and Imran Khan as the allrounder.

Fanalysts have, to date, come up with a slightly different team. They too, have gone with Sharma and Tendulkar at the top, but have decided on Lara to join Kohli and de Villiers in the middle order. The Fanalysts are in agreement with Dhoni as the overwhelming favourite for the wicketkeeping position but have chosen Kallis as their all-rounder.

This evening, the panel and Zone will be picking their bowlers so tune into SportsMax at 4:30pm Eastern Standard Time or 5:30pm in the Eastern Caribbean. You can watch SportsMax on the SportsMax app, download it from the App Store or from Google Play.

Remember, Fanalyst votes count for 40% of the overall vote for places in the Ultimate XI. Just go to the SportsMax.tv home page and click on the banner or click on this link.

By the time Dwayne Bravo had scored his first One-Day International ton in 2006, his credentials as a bonified allrounder with real talent and skill had already been understood world over.

His batting has always suggested there was more there but it was his bowling that showed an incomparable depth. He has left many batsman swinging for the fences with full slower deliveries that inexplicably drop from the sky leaving them half-way through a shot and nowhere near the pitch of the ball.

Bravo’s statistics as an international cricketer, though, have been watered down by, injuries, controversy, and the lure of T20 Leagues with deep pockets.

This has meant intermittent international cricket for Bravo, and possibly a place among the great allrounders of the game from the region.

That said, Bravo is still playing and on the cusp of producing figures any allrounder would be proud of.

With a best of 6-43, Bravo has taken 199 wickets in ODI cricket at an average of 29.51 and with a strike rate of 32.7. He only averages 25 with the bat and has two centuries and 10 half-centuries to his name.

If there is anywhere his game has not lived up to its true potential, it is there with the bat. In the field, Bravo is also a lightning rod for brilliant moments. He is fast over the outfield and athletic. He is also a safe pair of hands anywhere on the field and will run you out if you take a chance to him.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Dwayne John Bravo

Born: October 7, 1983, Santa Cruz, Trinidad

Major teams: West Indies, Carib Beer XI, Chennai Super Kings, Chittagong Kings, Comilla Victorians, Dhaka Dynamites, DJ Bravo's XI, Dolphins, Essex, Gujarat Lions, ICC World XI, Kent, Lahore Qalandars, Maratha Arabians, Melbourne Renegades, Melbourne Stars, Middlesex, Mumbai Indians, Paarl Rocks, Peshawar Zalmi, Quetta Gladiators, RR Sarwan's XI, SC Joseph's XI, Shell Cricket Academy Invitation XI, Surrey, Sydney Sixers, Trinbago Knight Riders, Trinidad & Tobago, Trinidad & Tobago Red Steel, Trinidad & Tobago XI, University of West Indies Vice Chancellor's XI, UWI Vice Chancellor's Celebrity XI, UWI Vice Chancellor's XI, Victoria, West Indies A, West Indies Board President's XI, West Indies Board XI, Winnipeg Hawks

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

 

ODI Career (batting): West Indies (2004-2014)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave       BF       SR      100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct

164     141      24     2968      112*   25.36     3606   82.30      2       10      240     58      73      

 

ODI Career (bowling): West Indies (2004-2014)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs          Wkts   BBI     BBM          Ave    Econ   SR          4w     5w     10w

164    150    6511 5874          199    6/43 6/43          29.51 5.41   32.7          6       1       0

 

 

Career Highlights

  • In 164 ODI’s, he scored 2,968 runs at an average of 25.36
  • Picked up 199 wickets at an average of 29.52
  • 1 of 3 players to have 1000 runs and 50 wickets in each format of the game

Lance Klusener’s swing-for-the-fences approach to batting has fooled many into underscoring his technical ability with the bat, while his military medium pace makes many forget that at one time, the big South African once had enough purchase on his deliveries to either bowl you fullish deliveries or have you fending off bouncers.

With the drop in his pace, Klusener, who was a number-11 batsman, to begin with, adapted well, his average of 41.10 suggesting he could bat more than a bit.

He would score two centuries and 19 half-centuries in his 171-match ODI career. But even with his diminished pace, Klusener was a handful with the ball as well, taking 192 scalps in his career at an average of 29.95. On six occasion he had four wickets or more in a match, suggesting he had the ability to singlehandedly generate a favourable result for South Africa.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Lance Klusener

Born: September 4, 1971, Durban, Natal

Major teams: South Africa, Dolphins, Kolkata Tigers, KwaZulu-Natal, Middlesex, Mountaineers, Natal, Natal Country Districts, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rest of the World XI

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

 

ODI Career (batting): South Africa (1996-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave      BF        SR       100s     50s    4s      6s   

171      137     50      3576      103*   41.10    3977     89.91       2      19      293    76   

 

ODI Career (bowling): South Africa (1996-2004)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs    Wkts   BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ   SR      4w     5w    10w

171      164     7336   5751     192    6/49    6/49     29.95   4.70    38.2      1       6       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Scored 3,576 runs at an overage of 41.10
  • Player of the 1999 World Cup tournament
  • Picked up 192 wickets at an average of 29.95
  • He picked up six 5 wicket hauls in ODIs

At no time has Jacques Kallis’ ability as an allrounder and the importance he had in the South African side of the late 1990s and early 2000s been more obvious than was the case when he faced the West Indies in the Wills International Cup.

The competition, which later became known as the ICC Champions Trophy, featured Kallis in the semi-final singlehandedly dismissing the West Indies, first slamming 113 from 100 deliveries before bagging 5-30 with the ball to boot them from the tournament.

He would perform feats of that nature for years to come, and at the World Cup in the Caribbean was South Africa’s leading scorer, notching 485 of them.

But his ODI career, as was the case when he played Test cricket, started slowly. It took two years before he scored his first international ton in the format, scoring 111 against New Zealand at the WACA.

While his strike rate of 72.89 could be higher, it could also be said that Kallis understood that his South Africa needed him to bat that way if they were to do well. His 11,579 runs perhaps tells a better story about Kallis’ importance to South Africa. Add that to his 273 wickets from 283 innings with the ball, and you have the stuff of legends.   

 

Career Statistics

ODI Career (batting): South Africa (1996-2014)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS     Ave      BF          SR       100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct         

328       314    53     11579     139    44.36    15885     72.89     17      86       911    137    131   

 

ODI Career (bowling): South Africa (1996-2014)

Mat    Inns    Balls       Runs      Wkts    BBI     BBM     Ave    Econ   SR       4w     5w     10w

328      283    10750     8680       273      5/30    5/30     31.79   4.84   39.3       2        2         0

 

Career highlights

  • Only player over 10,000 runs and 250 wickets in both ODIs and Tests
  • Involved in 50 century partnerships in his ODI career
  • 2nd player to have 10,000 runs and 250 wickets in ODIs
  • Has received 32 Man of the Match awards in ODIs

There was not much dissension when a panel of experts selected India’s Mahendra Singh Dhoni to be the man they put forward as the Ultimate ODI XI wicketkeeper.

Dhoni got the better of players like Australia’s Adam Gilchrist, the Ultimate XI Test wicketkeeper, and Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara.

The clincher, for both the panel and the Zone, is Dhoni’s ability, not with the gloves, but to figure out what course of action to take in a run chase and largely come out on the winning side.

It was revealed on the SportsMax Zone yesterday that Dhoni has had successful run chases with him at the crease for India 96% of the time. Chances are if Dhoni is at the crease, India will win.

That was more important to the panel than the tremendous glovework of South Africa’s Mark Boucher, or the pinch-hitting ability of Adam Gilchrist. Those two are considered the greatest wicketkeepers of all time. However, the panel believes Dhoni is the greatest wicketkeeper-batsman the ODI game has ever seen.

More important than the panel and the Zone, are the Fanalysts, so says the weighting around the votes.

Fanalysts have 40% of the vote for who gets into SportsMax’s Ultimate XI, with the panel and the Zone, enjoying 30% each.

With that 40% of the votes, the Fanalysts have chosen to agree with the Zone and the panel for the most part. Yesterday was no exception.

In fact, Dhoni’s 46.29% to Kumar Sangakkara’s 17.14% of the votes represents the biggest margin of victory since the Ultimate XI began two months ago.

With that pick, the Fanalysts team so far includes Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as openers, Virat Kohli, Brian Lara, and AB de Villiers as the middle order, and Dhoni as the wicketkeeper.

The Zone and panel, however, have gone with Viv Richards in the place of Lara.

This evening, the panel and Zone will be voting on the Ultimate ODI team’s allrounder, with Fanalysts already seeming to decide on Jacques Kallis.

Ian Healy’s hard work and will to succeed, complemented by an undying loyalty to his teammates made him the pulse of the Australian team from October 14, 1988, when he began his ODI career, until May 25, 1997 when he played in his last one.

Healy was an aggressive runner between the wickets when he batted and despite not having all the big shots, was more than a handful for many a bowler who expected to be rid of the Australian innings soon after he came to the crease.

His quality as a wicketkeeper was always good, bearing in mind the penchant Australia had for finding real quicks for international duty. But that quality was never more on display as he kept wicket to the big-turning Shane Warne. In fact, his very nasal, “bowling Warnie,” became a signature sound, not just in Australian cricket, but the world around. Many young boys can be recalled mimicking ‘well bowled Warnie’ even though there was never another Warne at the other end. The partnerships between himself and Glen McGrath, Jason Gillespie, and Warne yielded many a wicket, the man named to Australia’s team of the 20th century claiming 233 scalps.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Ian Andrew Healy

Born: April 30, 1964, Spring Hill, Brisbane, Queensland

Major teams: Australia, Queensland

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Australia (1988-1997)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave     BF      SR      100s    50s   4s    6s      Ct          St

168      120     36      1764    56     21.00   2104   83.84      0        4    77     5       194         39

 

Career Highlights

  • 7th most dismissals in ODIs (233)
  • Completed 194 catches and 39 stumpings
  • Scored 1764 runs at an average of 21.00

Peter Jeffrey Dujon was as stylish with the bat as he was with the gloves. Many have called his efforts behind the stumps when the West Indies bowled a four-pronged pace attack of magnificent stature, one of the most spectacular sights of the 1980s.

Not usually required to score heavily for the West Indies from his place in the lower order, Duj never scored an ODI century but had six half-centuries, inclusive of 82 not out. Playing at a time when the scoring rate in ODIs was little better than Test cricket, Dujon’s strike rate of 67.51 was not slow, even if his average of 23.15 was a little low for a batsman of his quality. From behind the stumps he managed 204 dismissals, 21 of those stumpings.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Peter Jeffrey Leroy Dujon

Born: May 28, 1956, Kingston, Jamaica

Major teams: West Indies, Jamaica

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: West Indies (1981 – 1991)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave      BF      SR      100s    50s   Ct      St

169     120      36     1945      82*    23.15   2881   67.51      0       6      183    21

 

Career Highlights

  • 11th most dismissals in ODIs (204)
  • Had 183 catches and 21 stumpings in 169 ODIs
  • Scored 1,945 runs in ODIs at an average of 23.15
  • scored six half-centuries in ODIs

“Shabash shabash!” were common sounds coming through stump mics around the world whenever Pakistan were playing. That was because Moin Khan was Pakistan’s wicketkeeper, urging his bowler along with a hearty ‘well done!’. Moin was the pulse of the Pakistan team throughout the 1990s and his influence made them a competitive unit. Batting with the lower order Moin never managed an ODI century but his 12 fifties, including 72 in his final year of international cricket, always seemed to come when Pakistan needed it most. As a wicketkeeper, Moin was sharp enough to snaffle up 287 victims in his 219 ODI games.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Mohammad Moin Khan

Born: September 23, 1971, Rawalpindi, Punjab

Major teams: Pakistan, Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1990-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave      BF        SR      100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct     St

219     183      41     3266     72*    23.00    4017    81.30       0       12     218    61     214    73

 

Career Highlights

  • 5th most dismissals in ODIs (287)
  • 214 catches and 73 stumpings in 219 ODIs
  • Scored 3,266 runs in ODIs at an average of 23.00
  • 12 ODI half-centuries

Romesh Kaluwitharana debuted in Sri Lanka’s One-Day International team in 1990 against India but did not bad as his side, chasing down 136, romped to victory on the back of Aravinda de Silva’s unbeaten 63. Then, Kalu was considered a wicketkeeper who could bat a bit, but with no partner for Roshan Mahanama at the top of the order, his chance would come. Kaluwitharana would forge an opening partnership with another person thought to be unlikely to suit the spot, Sanath Jayasuriya. The partnership was legendary, transforming the ODI game completely, as the batsmen blasted the opposition off the park in the first 15 overs of the game when generally, openers were looking to solidify themselves at the crease in the hopes of continuing on to a big score. The two were fearless and their exploits made for a romping 1996 World Cup victory. His opportunities diminished after 2000 and the arrival of Kumar Sangakkara, but he still managed to distinguish himself as a wicketkeeper in the ODI game with more than 200 dismissals.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Romesh Shantha Kaluwitharana

Born: November 24, 1969, Colombo

Major teams: Sri Lanka, Colts Cricket Club, Galle Cricket Club, Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Sri Lanka (1990-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs          HS     Ave    BF          SR      100    50          4s      6s      Ct          St

189    181    14     3711          102* 22.22 4776          77.70 2       23          411    17     132          75

 

Career Highlights

  • Helped introduce aggressive batting approach in first 15 overs
  • 132 catches and 72 stumpings in 189 ODIs
  • Scored 3,711 runs at an average of 22.22

The Prince of Port of Spain did not pay enough respect to One-Day International cricket, so says world-renowned cricket umpire and commentator Chris Taylor and his opinions seem to have found favour with both the SportsMax Zone and a panel of experts picking SportsMax’s Ultimate ODI XI.

That favour does not extend to the Fanalysts picking the SportsMax Ultimate XI online though.

For them, Brian Lara is the first name that should be counted among batsmen 3-5.

Already, Lara has the most votes with India’s Virat Kohli running a close second. The final spot, according to the Fanalyst should go to ‘Mr 360’, South Africa’s AB de Villiers.

Just outside of the running for the Fanalyst is Sir Vivian Richards.

Neither the panel nor the SportsMax Zone would dare to leave Sir Viv out again after Fanalysts swung the Test XI voting in favour of Australia’s Don Bradman.

Thus far, the Zone and the panel have been moving in lock-step, both picking Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as their openers and both coming up with Viv Richards, AB de Villiers and Virat Kohli as their batsmen from 3-5.

That means, of course, there is no space for fan favourite Lara, while all three groups are in agreement that Ricky Ponting, Mahendra Singh Dhoni, Ross Taylor, Mike Hussey, Michael Bevan, Kumar Sangakarra, Inzamam-ul-Haq, and Aravinda de Silva don’t quite match up, as great as they all are.

Shane Watson overcame a myriad of injuries to become one of Australia’s most important players in the early 2000s. Watson had more than one stress fracture in his back, hamstring strains, calf problems, a dislocated shoulder, food poisoning that presented symptoms like that of a heart attack, still, he prevailed, becoming a feared batsman, who could take a game away from you. He combined the patience he learned as an Australian Test opener with aggression and power in a way that made him a nightmare for the opposition even if he was at the crease for just a few overs.

Having bat in every conceivable position during that Test career, he became a man for all seasons in the one-day version of the game. With nine centuries and 33 fifties to go along with an average of 40.54 and a strike rate of 90, Watson is most decidedly a batting all-rounder.

But with a physique like his, being more than a medium pacer was always going to be a part of the plan.

He would end his ODI career with 168 wickets at an average of 31.79 at a strike rate of 38.4

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Shane Robert Watson

Born: June 17, 1981, Ipswich, Queensland

Major teams: Australia, Australia A, Australia Under-19s, Canterbury, Chennai Super Kings, Cricket Australia XI, Deccan Gladiators, Dhaka Dynamites, Gilchrist XI, Hampshire, Islamabad United, New South Wales, Prime Minister's XI, Queensland, Queensland Colts, Queensland Under-19s, Quetta Gladiators, Rajasthan Royals, Rangpur Rangers, Redlands, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Sindhis, St Lucia Zouks, Sydney Sixers, Sydney Thunder, Tasmania

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

Height: 1.83 m

 

ODI Career (batting): Australia (2002-2015)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS       Ave      BF      SR      100s     50s    4s      6s    

190     169     27      5757     185*   40.54     6365  90.44      9        33     570     131  

 

ODI Career (bowling): Australia (2002-2015)

Mat    Inns    Balls    Runs      Wkts   BBI     BBM     Ave      Econ    SR      4w     5w     10w

190      163    6466    5342        168    4/36     4/36    31.79    4.95     38.4      3       0         0

 

 

Career Highlights

  • Fastest Australian to "5000 runs and 150 wickets"
  • Held 'Fastest 150' record for 4 years
  • Highest ODI score in a run-chase (185*)
  • Highest ODI score (185*) and most sixes in an innings (15), by an Australian

Rohan Kanhai enjoyed a career in which he played on great teams from start to finish.

Maybe it is a testament to his ability that he was a mainstay for the West Indies during this period since the cluster of nations had been seeing a swell in the number of talented batsmen it had been producing.

Names like Sir Garfield Sobers, Joe Solomon, Clyde Hunte and Basil Butcher were just some of the talents in the West Indies line-up when Kanhai started his sojourn in Test cricket, and when that sojourn ended 17 years later, the Guyanese batsman had been joined by the likes of Roy Fredericks, Lawrence Rowe, Alvin Kallicharan, Clive Lloyd and of course, Sobers was still around.

Despite spending 17 years at the top, Kanhai’s start to Test cricket was not as convincing as his career would eventually turn out to be.

on New year’s Eve in 1958, more than a year after his debut for the West Indies, Kanhai had yet to make his mark, had yet to prove why the selectors had kept persevering with him.

In truth, he hadn’t done badly, scoring three half-centuries in his first 23 innings. But he had never notched three figures, getting as close as 96 in February of 1958.

In Kolkata, that was to change.

The West Indies had dominated India in the first two Tests of a five-match series but Kanhai had yet to build on some good starts, scoring 66 and 22, nought and 41 in his first four times facing the Indians.

To date, Kanhai had only faced England and Pakistan, with India providing a new challenge to his fledgeling career.

On New Year’s Eve, West Indies had chosen to bat but were in early trouble when Kanhai walked to crease. Medium-pacer Raman Surendranath had, the ball before, removed JK Holt caught for just five.

India threatened for an instant, as Sir Conrade Hunte was back in the pavilion for just 23, leaving the West Indies at 72-2.

Six hours and 42 boundaries later, Kanhai was still there.

Collie Smith had tried to entertain a partnership but he went for 34 to leave the West Indies 180-3. Not a terrible return, but India were very much still in the game.

Kanhai eventually found a willing partner in Guyana teammate Butcher, who scored 103.

Day one would end with the West Indies in a strong position at 359 for 3.

Butcher was not out on 87 and Kanhai had his first Test century, a double. He was on 203 not out.

The following day, Kanhai would continue to keep the Indian bowlers at bay, going on to score his highest Test score of 256 before Surendranath had him caught by Polly Umrigar.

The damage had already been done and an unbeaten century of 106 from Sobers along with Solomon’s fine lower-order stand of 69 not out left the Indians staring down the barrel of 614. All this and Jamaica’s Gerry Alexander, a wicketkeeper who could bat as well, had not even faced a delivery.

That 256, coming in Kanhai’s 13th Test, was a watershed moment. Afterwards, he would get over the three-figures hump 14 more times in his career and score 28 half-centuries to boot to end with a very healthy average of 47.53.

Like sort of a warning, Kanhai would score 99 in the very next Test, before scoring another double century against Pakistan a few months later.

West Indies sealed the series in that game, winning by an innings and 336 runs and went on to register a 4-0 win following a drawn fifth Test.

While Kanhai and co. batted the Indians out of the game, it must be said the hosts had a major problem with handling the pace of Roy Gilchrist, whose match figures of 3-18 and 6-55, ensured the game would end inside four days.

A country blessed with elegant batsmen, picking an all-time best Guyana line-up has been the most difficult of all the countries to date.

While many of the other territories in our all-time West Indies Championship have been blessed with talent throughout, no other country, it seems, has as many talented batsmen on equal footing at the First-Class level.

That is a good problem for a coach to have and if you were coaching this Guyana outfit, it is hardly likely that you come up against a team who could manage a total your line-up could not overhaul.

As usual, we welcome your feedback on whether or not we got this Best XI right. Tell us who we should have kept or who we should not have included, leave a comment under the story on Facebook and we can have a good old-fashioned debate.

 

Guyana’s Best XI

 

 

Roy Fredericks

Roy Fredericks significant ability made him a mainstay in the West Indies side, batting first with another Guyanese opener in Steve Camacho before joining forces with Gordon Greenidge. At the First-Class level, Fredericks was a powerful batsman, relishing the challenge of attacking the most fearsome of pace bowlers of which the West Indies had many. Fredericks, a master of the cut and hook shots, was known at the international level for scoring quick 50s but not converting them to centuries. At the First-Class level, this wasn’t true as Fredericks slammed 40 centuries to his 80 half-centuries on his way to 16,384 career runs at a more-than-respectable average of 45.89. Fredericks would play two more innings after announcing his retirement in 1983, slamming 103 against Trinidad and 217 against Jamaica.

 

First-class career: 1963-1983

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave       100s    50s    6s      Ct   

223     391      34     16384   250    45.89       40      80      177     0

 

 

Rohan Kanhai (wicketkeeping opener)

With such a dearth of batting in an all-time Guyana line-up, it is interesting that Rohan Kanhai, a lifelong number-three batsman, would be asked to open and wicketkeep, but a stacked middle-order which could take the batting down to eight or nine without much of a shift in quality means Kanhai gets to face the new ball with Fredericks. At the first-class level, Khanai was absolutely brilliant, scoring 86 centuries and 120 half-centuries in a 23-year-long career. Kanhai’s average of 45.89 after 421 games is no small feat, but more than the runs he accumulated, was the way he did it and when he did it. Kanhai was elegance personified but there was real power too. An ESPN Cricinfo article by noted poet, novelist and columnist in Georgetown, Guyana, Ian McDonald, summed it up best.

“You could feel it charge the air around him as he walked to the wicket. I do not know quite how to describe it. It was something that kept the heart beating hard with a special sort of excited fear all through a Kanhai innings, as if something marvellous or terrible or even sacred was about to happen.”

 

First-class career: 1954-1977

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave    100s    50s      Ct       St

421      675     83     29250    256    49.40    86     120       325      7

 

 

Shivnarine Chanderpaul

The raw emotion of Fredericks’ batting along with the unequalled grace of Kanhai’s may best be tempered with the obdurate efforts of Shivnarine Chanderpaul. Unorthodox technique and all, Chanderpaul could bat for days without bothering himself too much about scoring and this patience made him into a legend of West Indies cricket. But he could get aggressive too when it called for it. On other days, when he was in the mood like the day he faced 478 deliveries against Jamaica in a Red Stripe Cup game at Sabina Park to score an unbeaten 303, he was impossible to remove from the wicket. That determination and those powers of concentration are a big reason behind his 53.17 average after 385 First-Class games. In all, Chanderpaul would notch a whopping 77 centuries and 144 half-centuries during a career lasting 27 years.

 

First-class career: 1991-2018

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave    100s    50s         

385      626    108    27545     303*   53.17     77     144               

 

Basil Butcher

Very ‘wristy’ was one way to describe Basil Butcher, a batsman who was extremely reliable for both the West Indies and Guyana. His ability to turn deliveries around the ground belied his name, he certainly was no butcher, but rather thrived on the art of batsmanship. He was also notoriously good at blocking out his circumstances and there is a famous story about him opening a letter that told him of his wife’s miscarriage during a match against England at Lord’s. Butcher would go onto the field after reading the letter and while visibly upset, score a match-saving 133. For British Guiana in the first instance, and for Guyana in the second, innings like that became quite a bit of a staple for Butcher. In 169 matches he would score 31 centuries and 54 half-centuries. Australian commentator, without seeing his exploits at the First-Class level, described Butcher as the most difficult of all West Indians to get out. Butcher was also a competent leg spinner, taking 40 wickets in his career at an average of 30.42 and with a strike rate of 54.8.

 

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave    100s     50s    

169      262    29      11628    209*  49.90     31       54   

 

 

Carl Hooper

Carl Hooper was a cool customer, rarely ever looking troubled at the crease. At the international level, this proved problematic because he would get out and it was rarely understandable how it happened. At the First-Class level though, those lapses of concentration that led to him ending with a 36.46 average were absent. Hooper scored 69 centuries at the First-Class level and was one of the most prolific West Indies batsmen of all time, more than 23,000 runs at an average of 47.68. He had 104 half-centuries to boot in a career that spanned 21 years. In those 21 years, Hooper also turned his arm over a few times, ending his career with 555 wickets at an average of 35.30.

 

First-class career (batting): 1984-2004

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave      100s    50s         

339      535     52     23034     236*   47.68       69     104                     

 

First-class career (bowling): 1984-2004

Mat    Inns    Balls      Runs      Wkts    BBI     Ave      Econ   SR      5w     10w

339                46464    19595     555      7/93    35.30    2.53    83.7    18        0

 

 

Clive Lloyd

Standing at 6ft 5in, Clive Lloyd was a dominant figure in World Cricket, but as a First-Class cricketer, those 6 feet plus grew to at least 10. Averaging just south of 50, the hard-hitting former West Indies captain was a man for the moment. If you wanted to see Lloyd at his best, put his team in trouble and that would be an almost eventuality. Seventy-nine times Lloyd would pass the three-figure mark including a career-best 242 not out, and he would get to a half-century or more on 172 other occasions.

 

First-class career: 1963-1986

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave    100s    50s         

490     730      96     31232    242*   49.26     79     172      

 

      

 

Alvin Kallicharran

Alvin Kallicharran could play all the shots in the book, but not only that, he could do it with a certain poise and grace almost unparalleled even today. Usually, with the kind of genius Kallicharran displayed, there comes episodes that may hinder that genius. There was none of that for Kallicharran who averaged 43.64 over the course of 505 first-class games. That average had been coming down as well, because Kallicharran, played long past the point where he was still at his best. He holds the record for the highest number of centuries from a Guyanese bat, the figure standing at 87, and 160 half-centuries to boot, with only Clive Lloyd having scored more. He would end his career with 32,650 first-class runs under his belt, again, another record for a Guyanese batsman.

 

First-class career: 1966-1990

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave     100s    50s        

505      834     86     32650     243*   43.64      87     160           

 

Colin Croft

Colin Croft’s modus operandi was aggression and you couldn’t tell if he really meant to kill you after a vicious bouncer whizzed by your ear. With his very noticeable lean to the left side of the wicket, Croft would get the ball to angle towards a right-hander quite sharply before it would straighten off the pitch. That movement with pace and bounce was difficult to navigate for even the most proper of batsmen and only the very talented would survive for too long. In just 121 first-class matches, Croft would claim 428 scalps and some of those wickets were literally scalps, at the incredibly low average of 24.59. His strike rate of 49.3 makes him the most dangerous bowler Guyana has ever produced.

 

First-class career: 1971-1982

Mat    Inns     Balls      Wkts   BBI     Ave     Econ   SR       5w     10w

121     21101   10527    428     8/29    24.59   2.99    49.3     17        1

 

        

Roger Harper (allrounder)

With 567 wickets under his belt, Roger Harper is most decidedly a bowling allrounder. His average of 25.97 at a strike rate of 66.7 bares this truth out but he could also bat, having scored 10 centuries and 36 half-centuries in the 200 first-class matches he has played. Harper, like many allrounders, never wanted to be left out of the game and would make his presence felt in the field as well, picking up and throwing down the stumps all in one motion or cutting off a certain boundary. You couldn’t hit it in the air to him either because his buckets for hands would make no mistake. A tall offspinner, Harper turned the ball depending on the pitch he was bowling on but depended more on deception in flight to get him wickets. His height meant he could make a ball look like it was in the air for a long time when it really wasn’t, as well as he could spare in quick yorkers that would leave a batsman strangled for time to get his feet out of the way.

 

First-class career (batting): 1979-1997

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave    100s    50s         

200      263     43     7480      234    34.00     10      36                      

 

First-class career (bowling): 1979-1997

Mat    Balls      Runs      Wkts    BBI     Ave     Econ    SR      5w     10w

200     37825    14726      567     6/24    25.97   2.33     66.7     28       3

 

 

Reon King

Reon King is quite possibly the most underrated bowler in the history of West Indies cricket, especially after fast-bowling royalty, Michael Holding, said he could neither bat, bowl nor field. King only played in 19 Tests for the West Indies but lost a yard of pace largely because of a niggling heel injury. Before that though, King generated good pace through an effortless run-up that some ironically likened to Holding’s. Before his career came to an end though, King managed 95 first-class games and 293 wickets at an average of 27.48. His figures, had he been able to remain fit may have surprised Holding. His 11 five-wicket hauls and one 10-wicket haul suggests he could turn a match.

 

First-class career: 1995-2007

Mat    Balls    Runs     wkts   BBI     Ave     Econ   SR     5w     10w

95      16120   8053      293    7/82    27.48   2.99    55.0    11       1

 

Lance Gibbs

Lance Gibbs is the most successful spinner in West Indies history, once holding the world record for most number of wickets in Test cricket history. He was no less of a standout in regional cricket. Generating immense spin with his long fingers, Gibbs was also accurate to a fault. More than a thousand batsmen at the first-class level found him impossible to deal with and his strike rate of 27.22 is proof positive of the danger he posed to them. But Gibbs’ ability to single-handedly turn a match was the real gift the spinner possessed, having taken five wickets in an innings on an unbelievable 50 occasions, and laying claim to ten 10-wicket hauls.

 

First-class career: 1953-1975

Mat    Balls    Runs      Wkts   BBI     Ave    Econ   SR      5w    10w

330     78430  27878     1024   8/37    27.22   2.13   76.5     50     10

Fanalysts attempting to have their say in the makeup of SportsMax’s Ultimate XI One-Day International (ODI) XI have begun to come around to the idea of axing Chris Gayle from their team even as the Zone and a panel of experts have chopped the list of batsmen 3-5 in half.

Yesterday, fans had been in agreement that Chris Gayle should be one of the openers in its Ultimate XI ODI team, but today, many of those minds have changed, with Gayle now trailing in the voting behind Sachin Tendulkar and Rohit Sharma, the two Indian batsmen the SportsMax Zone and the panel had agreed upon.

Today the SportsMax Zone asked its panel of experts to cut its list of 12 players vying for the spot to six and despite the number of big names, there was ruthless efficiency in dismissing a number of greats.

First to go was one of Pakistan’s most respected batsmen in Inzamum-ul-Haq, who statistics say, bat too slowly to compete with the all-time great middle-order batsmen.

Inzy was competing against the likes of Australia’s Ricky Ponting, Michael Bevan and Mike Hussey, India’s Virat Kohli and Mahendra Singh Dhoni, South Africa’s AB de Villiers, the west Indies’ Brian Lara and Sir Vivian Richards, Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara and Aravinda de Silva, as well as New Zealand’s Ross Taylor.

Joining Inzy in the dressing room are Dhoni, Bevan, Hussey, de Silva, and Taylor.

Taylor was seen as the best from New Zealand but not a standout when compared to the other great middle-order batsmen of his era, while Dhoni was chopped, presumably because he is expected to compete favourably for a spot as the Ultimate XI’s wicketkeeper.

Bevan and Hussey, despite great averages and the latter’s ‘Mr Cricket’ moniker, were seen as a little outclassed by the other batsmen, while de Silva boasted an average that was too low to compete with the others in the group.

Tomorrow, the panel will discuss the merits and demerits, if there are any, from a group of Sangakarra, Ponting, Kohli, Lara, de Villiers, and Sir Viv.

Remember, no matter what has happened so far, votes are still open for all positions and you can have your say by going to SportsMax.tv and clicking on the banner, or following the link here.

A team in transition was what Ross Taylor found when he joined the ranks of the black caps in 2006.

Gone were the names of the 1990s and New Zealand needed a new talisman. Taylor has not disappointed, scoring his first century in just his third One-Day International, 128, against Sri Lanka in Napier.

Taylor is brave. Known for slog sweeping quick bowlers with no thought to the danger such a ploy poses to his health. He is also a very powerful puller and cutter of the ball.

With great power comes great responsibility and Taylor has shown himself up to the task of providing the Black Caps with that necessary consistency over the last 10 years, while they hone tremendous talent around him. At 36, Taylor is in the twilight of his career but nobody would bet against him adding to his 21 ODI centuries and 51 half-centuries.                 

Career Statistics

Full name: Luteru Ross Poutoa Lote Taylor

Born: March 8, 1984, Lower Hutt, Wellington

Major teams: New Zealand, Australian Capital Territory, Central Districts, Central Districts Under-19s, Delhi Daredevils, Durham, Jamaica Tallawahs, Middlesex, New Zealand Emerging Players, New Zealand Under-19s, Pune Warriors, Rajasthan Royals, Royal Challengers Bangalore, St Lucia Zouks, Sussex, Trinidad & Tobago Red Steel, Victoria

Playing role: Middle-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

 

ODI Career: New Zealand (2006-present)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave      BF         SR      100s    50s     4s      6s     

232     216      39     8574      181*   48.44    10273   83.46      21      51      711    146   

 

Career Highlights

  • First Kiwi to have centuries against all Test-playing nations in ODIs
  • Tallied 8574 runs at an average of 48.44
  • Produced 21 centuries and 51 half-centuries in ODIs
  • Between 2015 and 2017, he averaged 61.48
  • Between 2018 and the present, he’s averaged 68.46
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