Famously known as the Haryana Hurricane, he was a right-arm fast bowler and a right-handed batsman. He will always be remembered for his deadly outswingers, aggressive batting and for leading the Indian team to a World Cup victory in 1983.

Kapil Dev proved himself as a prominent member of the Indian cricket team when he took two five-wicket hauls against Australia in a home series in 1979.

He gained earned even more acclaim during a six-Test home series against Pakistan in 1979-80 season. He led India to victory twice in that series. Once by playing a knock of 69 at the Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai and second time with his daunting bowling taking 10 wickets at Chepauk, Chennai.

Career Statistics

Full name: Kapil Dev Ram Lal Nikhanj

Born: 6 January 1959 (age 61)

Place of Birth: Chandigarh, India

Batting Style: Right-handed

Bowling Style: Right-arm fast-medium

Role: All-rounder

 

 

Test Career (Batting) - India (1978–1994)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave     100s  50s   

131       184    15     5248      163    31.05       8      27    

 

Test Career (Bowling) - India (1978–1994)

Mat    Inns    Balls       Runs   Wkts  BBI        BBM      Ave     Econ    SR    4w   5w     10w

131       227    27740     12867    434    9/83     11/146    29.64    2.78    63.9   17     23      2

 

 

Career Highlights

  • 1983 – Wisden Cricketer of the Year
  • 2002 – Wisden Indian Cricketer of the Century
  • 2010 – ICC Cricket Hall of Fame
  • Only player to score 5,000 runs and take 400 wickets in Tests
  • Amassed 5248 at an average of 31.05
  • Took 434 wickets at 29.64

Sunil Gavaskar is the first in a long line of great Indian batsmen. He was the first in the history of cricket to get to 10,000 Test runs and the first to score 30 centuries. He was the lynchpin of the Indian teams of the 1970s and ‘80s, leading from ball one with near-perfect technique and immense powers of concentration. Gavaskar enjoyed success even against the great West Indies fast-bowling units of the same period. On debut in 1971, Gavaskar scored 774 runs in four Tests in the West Indies, still a record for a debutant to this day. In the last Test of that series in Port-of-Spain, Gavaskar became only the second man in Test cricket history to score a century and double century in one match when he made 124 in the first innings and 220 in the second. Gavaskar’s final innings in Test cricket at the age of xx was 96 against Pakistan and came off the back of a string of 16 Tests where he averaged more than 58.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Sunil Manohar Gavaskar

Born: July 10, 1949, Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra

Major teams: India, Mumbai, Somerset

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium, Right-arm offbreak

Role: Opener

Height 5 ft 5 in

 

Test Career - India (1971-1987)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS         Ave    100s   50s           

125      214     16     10122     236*     51.12      34    45           

 

Career Highlights

  • Was nicknamed “Little Master”
  • Scored 9607 of his 10,122 runs as an opener
  • Scored 33 of his 34 centuries as an opener
  • Has scored the most centuries by an opening batsman
  • Scored 18 of his 34 centuries away from home
  • His 45 half centuries is the 2nd most by a Test opener

Indian cricket board treasurer Arun Dhumal claims it would be "difficult" for the ICC T20 World Cup to go ahead as scheduled in Australia later this year.

The tournament is due to get under way in October, but the coronavirus pandemic has sparked doubt over whether it can take place.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) is going ahead with plans to stage the competition, but Cricket Australia chief executive Kevin Roberts said "all other options" are being explored.

Dhumal, from the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), has suggested it may be unrealistic for the World Cup to take place given players are likely to have spent a sustained period out of action.

He told the Sydney Morning Herald: "They will have been out of cricket for a long time. Would you want to be without training for that long and straight away go and play [the] World Cup?

"That is a call every board has to take. It seems to be difficult."

Dhumal says India would expect to be quarantined if they do travel to Australia.

"There is no choice - everyone will have to do that. You would want to resume the cricket." he added.

"Two weeks is not that long a lockdown. That would be ideal for any sportsman because when you are in quarantine for such a long period, then going to another country and having a two-week lockdown it would be a good thing to do.

"We'll have to see what the norms are post this lockdown."

Exceptionally talented and audacious, Virendra Sehwag is a devastating right-handed batsman, gifted with brilliant hand-eye co-ordination, fabulous timing, and a cool head in any situation or against any opponent. His idol being Sachin Tendulkar, Virender plays the straight drive, backfoot punch and whip off the hips in identical fashion to the little master’s. His appetite for runs and batting for long periods is also obvious from his two 300+ scores and his three 290+ scores in Test cricket. Those innings put him in the rarified air of the greatest batsmen to ever live. Sehwag is also an effective right-arm off-spin bowler and an agile slip-fielder.

 

Career Statistics 

Full name: Virender Sehwag

Born: October 20, 1978, Delhi

Major teams: India, Asia XI, Delhi, Delhi Daredevils, ICC World XI, India Blue, Kings XI Punjab, Leicestershire, Marylebone Cricket Club, Rajasthan Cricket Association President's XI

Role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

 

Test Career - India (1999–2013)

Mat    Inns    NO  Runs   HS     Ave    BF          SR       100s      50s   

104    180    6    8586  319  49.34  10441    82.23    23         32   

 

Career Highlights

  • Only batsman in the history to have scored 7,500-plus runs in both Tests & ODIs as an opener
  • Fastest Test triple century for which he took 278 balls
  • Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World 2008, 2009
  • ICC Test Player of the Year 2010
  • Most triple centuries in Tests: 2 (joint record holder along with Don Bradman, Brian Lara & Chris Gayle)
  • Most 290+ scores in Tests: 3 (joint record holder along with Don Bradman)

Steve Smith and Virat Kohli are talismanic figures who set the tone for their respective international sides, according to David Warner.

Australia's Smith and India's Kohli are two of the finest batsmen of their generation, occupying first and second spot respectively in the current Test rankings.

The duo are set to meet if India's tour of Australia – scheduled to begin in October – goes ahead, although significant doubt remains as the coronavirus pandemic continues to pose a threat.

If it should go ahead, Warner expects to see great things from the two leading men, who he says act as figureheads for their sides.

"When it comes to cricket, they both have got the mental strength, the mental capacity to score runs," Warner told Cricbuzz.

"They stabilise, they boost morale – if they score runs, everyone else's morale is up. If they are out cheaply, you almost sense that on the field that everyone is … [down on morale and thinking] now we all have to step up. It's a very bizarre situation.

"They both love spending time in the middle. Virat's passion and drive to score runs is different to what Steve's would be.

"Steve is going out there for a hit in the middle, that's how he sees things. He's hitting them out in the middle, he's having fun, he's enjoying himself, just does not want to get out.

"Virat, obviously, doesn't want to get out, but he knows if he spends a certain amount of time out there, he's going to score plenty of runs at a rapid rate.

"He's going to get on top of you. That allows the guys coming in [to play their own game], especially in the Indian team you've got a lot of players who can be flamboyant as well."

The late great Malcolm Marshall was a terrifying pace bowler and many have argued that he was the best there has ever been.

Smart, deceptively quick, and brutal, Marshall had all the attributes to make him a nightmare for any batsman, no matter how much class he possessed.

But on a day in 1983, in India no less, Marshall showed something new, well it was at least new to them.

Marshall had scored four centuries in his career outside of Test cricket, three for New Hampshire, and one when he was an under-19 cricketer, playing against Zimbabwe but his Test cricket average of 10, hadn’t shrouded him in glory. He would eventually push that average up to 18 by the time his career ended in 1991. But still, there was not much expected of him.

On a surprisingly slow wicket in Kanpur, the West Indies went to bat on the first day and soon got in trouble with Desmond Haynes, 6, Viv Richards, 24, Larry Gomes, 21, skipper Clive Lloyd, 23, and Gus Logie, 0, all back in the pavilion.

In step Phillip Jeffrey Dujon to join the unusually sedate Gordon Greenidge and the two set to rebuilding the innings, but at 255-5 on the first day and despite a recovery from 157-5, the game was still in the balance.

Greenidge would resume on the second day on his overnight 130 and go on to bat for just over nine hours on his way to scoring 194 from 368 deliveries.

The great West Indies opener would strike 23 fours and not a single six in his near-200-run innings, while Dujon, who was on 48 from the day before, was marginally more adventurous, batting for just about three hours before he was bowled by Roger Binny for 81.

Marshall walked to the wicket looking like he did not have a care in the world on the second day, probably sure in his mind that when he got the ball, the balance of the game would swing yet again.

But before that though, he might have well give his fellow pacers some more time to relax in the pavilion.

Marshall, batting with Greenidge, showed he wasn’t just good with ball in hand but hunkered down for the next three hours or so and faced 151 deliveries on his way to his highest ever Test score, 92. Forty-four of those 92 runs would come in boundaries.

He played no small part in helping Greenidge score as many as he did. When Greendidge went, Eldine Baptiste, 6, Michael Holding, 0, and  Winston Davis, 0, did not last long.

But Marshall wasn’t done yet either. He would return to make a mockery of Kapil Dev’s 4-99 with 4-19 that put the result decidedly in West Indies’ favour. The West Indies had made 454 all out on the back of Marshall, Dujon, and Greenidge’s innings but then the paceman helped route India for just 207.

The West Indies would not bat again, as for the second time in the game, Marshall grabbed four, this time going for all of 47.

Marshall’s bowling, as per usual, was tremendous, but this was the first time his batting was doing the talking as the West Indies removed Pakistan for 164 to win the game by an innings and 83 runs.

The West Indies would go on to win the 6-Test series 3-0 and Marshall had become a legend in India.

Ali Bacher has urged the cricket world to accept behind-closed-doors matches could be the salvation of the sport at international level.

Bacher, 77, went from playing for and captaining South Africa to becoming the most powerful administrator in the country by the turn of the century.

Now he believes cricket must unite behind rescue plans amid the global coronavirus crisis to avert a financial calamity, insisting safeguarding broadcast income must be the priority.

Only by putting on international matches can that be guaranteed, with Bacher urging governing bodies to be as creative and receptive to the new state of the world as needs be.

He told the Times of India: "So many of us wake up every day and hope that the virus has gone. This will not happen.

"World medical experts predict that this pandemic will last anything up to 18 months. The consequences for world cricket would be very serious, unless world cricket agrees to and allows international cricket matches to be played to empty stadiums.

"The massive global TV audience would not diminish and the income the Test-playing countries would receive from the broadcasters would allow them to survive this crisis, which is unprecedented since World War II."

Bacher has urged South Africa and India to consider switching their recently aborted ODI series to a neutral territory, such as the United Arab Emirates.

He said: "Our government medical advisers have gone public and said that the coronavirus will hit South Africa the hardest in July and August. Maybe Sourav [Ganguly, president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India] and Graeme [Smith, South Africa's director of cricket] should be looking now at possible new venues like the UAE hoping that the airline industry will be functioning in August."

Usman Khawaja has revealed he is "very shocked" at the financial situation Cricket Australia (CA) finds itself in due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

CA stood down the vast majority of its staff on reduced pay from April 27 until the end of the financial year, with concerns over when international action will be able to resume.

Australia are due to stage the ICC T20 World Cup, as well as welcome India for a lucrative tour, yet their home schedule could be at risk because of the global health crisis.

Admitting it is disappointing how the situation has played out, Khawaja hopes CA and the Australian Cricketers' Association (ACA) can work together to come through what he feels is a cash-flow problem that could have been avoided.

"I was very shocked. I knew our projections for revenue were still very high and I think they still are, depending on what happens with the India series," he told Fox Sports.

"It's a bit confusing. I don't have all the financial information in front of me, but it seems like it's more of a cash-flow problem at the moment.

"There's obviously a little bit of mismanagement there somewhere, with the portfolio and putting a lot of money into the share market.

"To me that's Business 101. To make sure you have enough cash reserves if c**p hits the fan.

"So I'm a little bit disappointed on that front ... but what's been done is done now, so it's just our responsibility as CA and ACA to work through this."

Khawaja was absent from the list of players to be handed national contracts by CA this week, having not played a Test since being dropped during the 2019 Ashes in England.

The left-hander, who averages over 40 in the longest format, still believes he is one of the best six batsmen in the country and feels the criticism of his play against spin is unjustified.

"Without sounding arrogant, I still feel like I'm one of the top six batsmen in the country," Khawaja said.

"My playing against spin has been right up there as some of the best in the county. Bar maybe Steve Smith, who is an absolute genius.

"But the most important thing is to score runs."

Unheralded West Indies middle-order batsman Larry Gomes has rated his century against India at Queens Park Oval in Trinidad and Tobago as his best.

Australia have replaced India at the top of the ICC Test rankings and are also the number one Twenty20 side in the world.

India had been the top-ranked Test side since October 2016 but have dropped to third behind Tim Paine's men and New Zealand.

Australia lead the way with 116 points, with the Black Caps on 115 and Virat Kohli's side - still top of the Test Championship - amassing 114. South Africa dropped below Sri Lanka into sixth spot.

Results from 2016-17 were wiped off when the latest rankings were calculated, with matches played since May last year rated at 100 per cent and those from the previous two years 50 per cent.

Australia drew the Ashes series in England 2-2 last year before whitewashing Pakistan and New Zealand on home soil. 

There have been plenty of changes in the T20 order, with Australia rising to the summit for the first time since rankings were introduced in 2011.

They replace Pakistan, who slip to fourth, with England up to second and India into third.

World champions England have increased their advantage over India at the top of the ODI rankings to eight points.

Tim Paine says Australia's players will not be greedy if they are asked to take a pay cut as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Cricket Australia (CA) will stand down the majority of its staff on reduced pay from April 27 until the end of the financial year amid the COVID-19 crisis.

CA is also in negotiations with the Australian Cricketers' Association (ACA) over player salaries.

With such uncertainty over when they will next take to the field at international level, Test captain Paine knows the players must look at the bigger picture.

"Players need to know the absolute financial positions of the game and the players aren't going to be greedy," he told ABC Radio.

"Our livelihood, all the people associated with the ACA and the players' association, their livelihood is dependent on the game of cricket being healthy.

"So at the moment if a pay cut for us is on the cards and that keeps our game thriving well into the future, then that’s something we'll certainly have to look at."

Paine was not surprised when he learned of CA's financial situation, though.

He added: "I think commercially a lot of sponsors have been pretty hard hit and it's obviously going to hit Cricket Australia at some stage then as well.

"I think there's a bit of safeguarding towards the potential of India not coming [for a tour starting in October] which is worth something like 250 to 300million [Australian] dollars."

It is 17 years to the day since Jacques Rudolph announced himself on the Test stage with a magnificent debut double-century for South Africa against Bangladesh.

Rudolph crafted a brilliant 222 not out on day three of a crushing innings-and-60-run win in Chittagong aged only 21.

Australia's Charles Bannerman was the first cricketer to score a century on his Test bow against England way back in 1877, while the great W.G. Grace also hit a debut hundred.

We pick out five of the best debuts in the longest format over the years.

 

TIP-TOP FOSTER MAKES AUSTRALIA SUFFER

Reginald Erskine Foster, or 'Tip' as he was known, grasped his opportunity with both hands after being selected for the first Ashes Test in 1903.

Business commitments prevented Foster from making his England debut earlier, but he made up for lost time in Sydney with a record-breaking innings.

He made 287 - more than Australia's first innings total - after coming in at number five in the tourists' first innings, finding the boundary on 37 occasions.

England went on to win by five wickets thanks to Foster's knock, a Test record on debut. 

 

SWEET 16 FOR MASSIE

Bob Massie could not have dreamed of a better start to what proved to be a short Australia career.

The seamer tore through England in both innings of the second Test at Lord's in June 1972, claiming an incredible 16 wickets in the match.

Massie took 8-84 in the first innings and 8-53 second time around, setting up an emphatic eight-wicket victory.

His match figures of 16-137 are the fourth-best in Test history, not bad for a bowler who went on to play in only nine matches for his country.

 

ROWE THE KING OF SABINA PARK

Big things were expected of Lawrence Rowe ahead of his West Indies debut on his home ground Sabina Park against New Zealand in 1972.

The Jamaican batsman lived up to the hype in spectacular fashion, striking a flawless 214 in the first innings in Kingston.

Rowe inflicted more punishment on the tourists' attack in the second innings with 100 not out, becoming the first man to score a double-century and a hundred on his Test debut.

New Zealand salvaged a draw, but that did not take the gloss of the exploits of Rowe, who said: "This is my home ground, and I have no right to get out here."

 

TEENAGER HIRWANI TEARS THROUGH WINDIES

Narendra Hirwani hit the ground running with a sensational India bow against West Indies in Chennai 32 years ago.

The bespectacled leg spinner took 16 wickets in the fourth Test, with 8-61 in the first innings and 8-75 to put the seal on a 255-run thumping.

The 19-year-old claimed the scalps of greats such as Viv Richards, Desmond Haynes and Richie Richardson on a pitch that he would have loved to have rolled up and taken with him.

Hirwani played only 17 Tests, with his staggering debut proving to be something of a false dawn but his match figures of 16-136 versus the Windies are the third-best in the longest format.

 

RUDOLPH TAMES TIGERS

Rudolph was just 21 when he got his chance to showcase his talents in the longest format and he showed his class in MA Aziz Stadium.

The left-hander shared an unbroken third-wicket stand of 429 with Boeta Dippenaar, a South Africa record and the 10th highest in Test history.

Rudolph hit two sixes and found the rope 29 times in a masterful innings, laying the platform for a huge victory along with Dippenaar.

Bangladesh were unable to take a wicket on day two and were eventually put out of their misery when Graeme Smith declared on the third day.

Alex Ferguson and David Moyes will remember April 22 as significant days in their Manchester United managerial careers for vastly contrasting reasons.

While for Red Devils legend Ferguson it is a day that ensured he bowed out from the game as a winner, something he became very accustomed to being at Old Trafford, for Moyes it is a day where a prophecy went unfulfilled.

Lennox Lewis will want to remember the date about as much as Moyes, while Sachin Tendulkar and Shane Warne engaged in a memorable showdown.

Below we take a look back at some significant moments of sporting history on April 22.


2013 – Van Persie treble delivers one last title for Fergie

It was unbeknownst at the time but Robin van Persie's superb first-half hat-trick in a 3-0 win over Aston Villa – including that volley from Wayne Rooney's assist – would take on extra significance.

The victory ensured United wrested the title back from rivals Manchester City, delivering a 13th Premier League trophy under Ferguson and a 20th top-flight triumph for the club overall.

Just over a couple of weeks later, Ferguson announced he would be stepping down after 26 glorious years that returned 38 trophies.

Ferguson is reported to have hand-picked Moyes personally as his successor, leading to him being dubbed the 'Chosen One' by the United faithful…

2014 – The 'Chosen One' done

Exactly a year later and the situation was worlds apart from the celebrations that saw United toast their latest title triumph.

Moyes was sacked just 10 months into a six-year contract with the champions, with United languishing down in seventh and guaranteed to record their lowest-ever points tally in the Premier League.

United particularly struggled at Old Trafford, so long a formidable fortress under Ferguson, while fans grew impatient with a docile style of play.

Louis van Gaal and Jose Mourinho have been and gone without returning United to the top of the pile, while Ole Gunnar Solskjaer's experiment remains a work in progress.

2001 – Lewis shocked by underdog Rahman

Lennox Lewis was the overwhelming favourite for the 'Thunder in Africa' against 20-1 shot Hasim Rahman in South Africa back in 2001.

But in one of the greatest upsets in boxing history, Lewis was floored by a strong right in the fifth round leaving the Briton unable to answer the count and surrendering his WBC and IBF heavyweight belts.

By November of that year, Lewis – after some legal wrangling – had his rematch and regained the belts with a fourth-round knockout.

1998 – Tendulkar goes after Warne

The record books will show Australia victorious by 26 runs, with India falling short in a revised target.

But the match against India was remembered for one particular legend v legend moment between Warne and Tendulkar.

Tendulkar masterfully judged the flight of Warne's delivery, smothered the spin and with astounding speed whacked the ball into the billboards at long-on.

Warne wiped the sweat off his face, knowing the personal battle on that occasion was emphatically lost.

Cricket Australia are considering all options to ensure the Test series against India goes ahead as scheduled later in 2020, including hosting all matches at the Adelaide Oval.

With Australia and many of the world's nations still in lockdown amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, sport in the country is suspended indefinitely.

India are scheduled to tour Australia from October to January, with four Tests planned along with three ODIs and three Twenty20 matches.

The T20 games are set to go ahead before the T20 World Cup, which is still due to take place in Australia between October and November.

While doubt remains over whether the tournament or tour will be able to go ahead, Cricket Australia’s chief executive Kevin Roberts is open to exploring every option.

"At this point, we won't rule anything out in terms of the Indian series," Roberts told reporters. 

"Along with the BCCI, the Indian players and their support staff, we want to stage a series that inspires the cricket world, whether or not there are people at the venue or not sitting in the stands.

"So we'll explore all viable options, many of which wouldn't have been contemplated until now. We are in a different world where all of a sudden we're being grateful for what we have rather than lament about things that we don't.

"What we are working on is our partnership with the BCCI. Whether that be about the pursuit of five-Test series in the future or whether it be about finding the most creative ways to ensure that together we can deliver an international Test series that inspires the cricket world throughout next summer.

"That's our focus. And we are planning for that and trying everything we can to make that happen."

One possibility that has been mooted is holding every match in Adelaide, with players housed in the ground's hotel - a solution Australia bowler Josh Hazlewood would be open to.

"It's obviously a last resort I guess," he said on Monday.

"But I think if anywhere could do it, it's probably Adelaide. It gives a bit to both batting and bowling. It's not ideal. We want to get around to all parts of Australia and challenge ourselves on all those different conditions, but if it had to happen, that's probably one of the best spots for it."

Despite an incredible comeback against Liverpool to book their place in the Champions League quarter-finals, 2019-20 was looking like far from a vintage season for Atletico Madrid.

Diego Simeone's side sat sixth in LaLiga when the coronavirus pandemic forced the suspension of most sport around the world and had suffered a humiliating Copa del Rey exit to third-tier Cultural Leonesa in January.

However, six years ago they took a significant step in one of the most memorable campaigns in their history.

We look back at that and other standout sporting moments that occurred on April 9 through the years.

 

1912 – A Fenway first

It may not quite have been finished yet, but Fenway Park opened its doors for the first time for an exhibition match between the Boston Red Sox and the Harvard Crimson. After being forced to change at the nearby Park Riding School due to the clubhouse not being open yet, the players trudged through the snowy conditions to the diamond for the start of a new era. Casey Hageman threw Fenway Park's first pitch for the Red Sox to Harvard batter Dana Joseph Paine Wingate and he soon had the first of nine strikeouts.

1989 – Faldo in green

After heading into moving day in a tie for the lead, Faldo's hopes of triumphing at Augusta National and winning a second major appeared to be over when he slipped five shots off the pace upon completing his third round on Sunday morning. However, he ended up with the clubhouse lead later in the day by carding a brilliant seven-under 65 and a missed five-foot par putt on the 17th for Scott Hoch meant the two went into a play-off. Hoch's putting again let him down as he failed to close out the first sudden-death hole from two feet, and Faldo punished him by rolling in a 25-foot birdie putt at the next to don the green jacket for the first time. He would go on to win the tournament twice more.

1995 – Tendulkar shows signs of greatness to come

At the age of 21, the man who would go on to be dubbed the 'Little Master' scored his fourth ODI century as India defeated Sri Lanka in an Asia Cup match in Sharjah. Thanks to Tendulkar's outstanding 112 not out, India chased down their victory target of 203 with just under 17 of their 50 overs remaining. Tendulkar consequently became the youngest player to reach 3,000 ODI runs.

2013 – Dortmund deliver incredible comeback

There is something special about Champions League nights at Signal Iduna Park and the second leg of Dortmund's quarter-final against Malaga delivered a thoroughly memorable game. After a 0-0 draw in the first leg at La Rosaleda, Joaquin put Malaga ahead in the 25th minute, but Robert Lewandowski ensured Jurgen Klopp's side went into half-time on level terms. The writing appeared to be on the wall for Dortmund when Eliseu tapped in a second away goal from close range with eight minutes remaining, leaving the hosts needing to score twice more to avoid elimination. Marco Reus pulled them level in the first added minute and Felipe Santana bundled home in the 93rd minute to complete an incredible turnaround – though he appeared to be offside when he turned Julian Schieber's goal-bound effort home.

2014 – Atletico back in the semi-finals

Simeone led Atletico to Europa League glory in his first season at the helm and added the Copa del Rey and UEFA Super Cup in 2012-13. They appeared to be destined for new heights when they claimed a 1-0 victory over Barcelona at the Vicente Calderon to seal a 2-1 aggregate victory and book their place in the Champions League semi-finals for the first time since 1974. Koke's back-post volley kept Atletico's hopes of a Champions League and LaLiga double alive, but they were only able to win the latter after Real Madrid beat them in the European final in Lisbon.

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