Despite being given clearance to compete for a spot at the IAAF World Championships of Athletics, Jamaican hurdler Danielle Williams remains in the hunt for a Diamond League trophy.

A Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) decision had deemed Williams ineligible to compete for a spot at this year’s World Championships after a false start at the country’s national trials, however, there was still a window for the athlete to make the team to Doha had she earned an automatic spot via winning the Diamond League.

Williams then broke the national record and is unbeaten over the 100-metre hurdles since that time. Her 12.32-second clocking meant she lead the world, putting the JAAA in some amount of discomfort.

However, earlier this week, another JAAA release said the athlete would be contemplated since her disqualification in the event, could not be counted since the race was deemed null and void after subsequent attempts at re-running it.

That being said, Williams’ time would suggest she is a shoe-in for a place on the team the JAAA said would be picked based on IAAF-ranking at the time of selection.

Williams leads the world rankings with 1385 points while Megan Tapper with 1263, Janeek Brown with 1257, and Yanique Thompson with 1202 are the next highest-ranked Jamaicans.

Should Williams earn an automatic place, Thompson, who for the moment is out of a place at the World Championships could be headed to Doha as well.

Still, Williams coach, Lennox Graham has come out to say, the 2015 World Champion would still be taking aim at the Diamond League Trophy.

“The focus of our season doesn’t change. Once the issue happened, we had made a conscious decision to focus on the things that we can control  and what we were in control of at the time was contractually agreed to already, running in the Diamond League and getting all the points you can and getting into the final and try to win. This decision extends her season so that’s the effect that this will have on it,” Graham had said in an interview with Radio Jamaica.

The Diamond League moves to Birmingham tomorrow where Williams is again down to compete.

Two-time Olympic gold medallist Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce will release her new book, ‘I Am A Promise’, in September.

The 32-yer-old Fraser-Pryce made the announcement on Saturday on social media.

‘I Am A Promise’, is a children’s picture book about the indomitable spirit of the six-time Olympic medal winner.

The book takes readers on Fraser-Pryce's journey from her childhood in the tough inner-city community of Waterhouse in Kingston, Jamaica, through to her development as a young athlete and finally to her first Olympic gold medal in the 100 metres in Beijing, China in 2008.

The story charts how Fraser-Pryce's commitment to hard work and encouragement from loved ones helped her to achieve every sprinter’s dreams and against great odds. The book encourages young readers to believe in themselves and to maximse their own promise to the world.

Fraser-Pryce, in a post on Facebook, said, “I am super excited to share my most recent project! My upcoming children’s book, I Am A Promise,  which will be launched in September in select Sangster’s Bookstores locations.

“Seeing my personal journey depicted in print and colour is such a blessing for me, and I am so humbled to be able to share it with you all.

“The genesis of this is founded on what I believe is fundamentally important; how we raise our children, the importance of consistent love and nurturing their God-given talents always.

“This book is extra special for me also as I will be able to read it to Zyon (her son) and teach him these valuable lessons as he grows up."

In 2016, Fraser-Pryce published her tell-all autobiography, ‘Pryceless Journey’, which detailed her many struggles and obstacles along the path to becoming an Olympic champion.

On August 16, 2009, Usain Bolt clocked 9.58 seconds in the final of the 100 metres at the IAAF World Championships in Berlin.

A decade on, with the eight-time Olympic champion now retired, that world-record time still stands.

At just 22, the Jamaican obliterated a mark he had set exactly one year earlier at the Olympics in Beijing, shaving more than a tenth of a second of the time.

Doctor Peter Weyand, a biomechanics expert at Southern Methodist University, told Omnisport what made Bolt so unique.

A slow starter?

One of the biggest misconceptions of Bolt was that, due to his 6ft 5in frame, he was a slow starter. Not true, says Weyand. Particularly on that night in Germany when only Dwain Chambers was ahead of him after the first few strides.

"The most unusual thing was how well he was able to start for somebody as big as he is," Weyand explained.

"Normally the people that accelerate and get out of the blocks very quickly tend to be the shorter sprinters. The physics and biology of acceleration favours smaller people. In 2009, I think he started as well as anybody in that race. The start was a differentiator."

Long legs = more force

Though his height may have given him a slight disadvantage out of the blocks, Bolt's frame came in handy once the race opened up, allowing him to generate more power in the short steps sprinters take.

"What limits how fast a sprinter can go is how much force they can get down in the really short periods of time they have to do it," Weyand said.

"If you're going faster, the only way to do what you need to do to pop your body back up with a shorter contact time is to put down more force. What all elite sprinters do is put down more force in relation to their body mass than people who aren't as fast.

"If you're Bolt and you're 6ft 5in, you have a longer leg and you have more forgiveness. He probably has six, seven, eight milliseconds more on the ground.

"You have to put down a peak force of about five times body weight and that needs to happen in three hundredths of a second after your foot comes down.

"He was so athletic and so tall. His long legs gave him more time on the ground."

Fewer strides, greater success

Believe it or not, sprinters cannot maintain their top speed for the entire 100m. Bolt, who also holds the 200m world record, had another advantage in that he needed fewer strides to cover the distances.

"He had 41 steps usually [over 100m] and the other guys are 44, 45, some of the shorter ones are up in the high 40s," Weyand added.

"Particularly over 200 metres, the step numbers are directly related to fatiguing. If you go through fewer steps and fewer intense muscular contractions to put force into the ground, you have a fatigue-sparing effect."

Unique, but not perfect

Given he was able to accelerate out of the blocks quickly – relatively for his height – and was able to use his frame to generate more force across fewer strides, Bolt might have looked like the perfect sprinter.

But Weyand argued: "You can make a case that Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is the best female sprinter ever and she's 5ft tall.

"There are trade-offs in terms of being forceful when you accelerate versus having more contact time at your top-end speed."

Will Bolt's WR ever be broken?

No current athlete looks close to eclipsing Bolt's time in the near future, but that does not mean his record time will stand forever.

In 2008, marathon runner and biology professor Mark Denny conducted research and predicted the fastest possible time a male sprinter could run is 9.48secs.

"Nothing's ever perfect, Bolt's obviously a unique athlete but no race is perfect and no set of circumstances are perfect," Weyand said.

"Certainly faster than 9.58 [is possible] but that's a question that's hard to answer without being pretty speculative."

The only thing that is certain is for now – as has been the case for the previous 10 years too – the title of 'the fastest man on earth' belongs to Bolt.

Lennox Graham, coach of Jamaican sprint hurdler Danielle Williams, said he was happy with the decision of the JAAA to consider the sprint hurdler for selection to the Jamaican team to compete at the IAAF World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar starting in late September.

Sportsmax.TV sources have indicated that 2017 World 110m hurdles champion Omar McLeod has joined the Tumbleweed camp of elite coach Rana Reider in Jacksonville, Florida.

Bahamian sprinter Tynia Gaither has named decorated Jamaica star Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce as one of her biggest inspirations after claiming a rare bronze medal for the country, at the Pan American Games last week.

On Friday, the 26-year-old Gaither crossed the line in 27.76 seconds, well behind winner Fraser-Pryce, who broke a 40-year-old record after clocking 22.43 to take gold.  Despite finishing some way behind Jamaican and getting passed by Brazil’s Vitoria Rosa, close to the line, the achievement was a significant one.  In fact, only three Bahamian women have done what Gaither did and all were a part of the nation’s golden generation.

In 1987, Pauline Davis-Thompson earned the first medal for the Bahamas sprinters at the event when she secured the bronze medal in the 100 and 200m.  In 1999, Chandra Sturrup clinched the first gold in the 100m and Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie followed by snatching the gold in the 200m.  Sturrup was the last female sprinter to medal at the Games after claiming a bronze in the 100m in 2007.

“Shelly-Ann is one of my idols, so every time I get to line up with her I’m on cloud nine,” Gaither told the Bahamas Tribune.

“She pushes me to a different level. I raced against her a few times and I can honestly say, I had some of my best races. So just to be able to be in that calibre with her was great. I wasn’t really nervous. I felt it was just a blessing to be there,”

Having so far successfully navigated a long season during which he defended his NCAA title and won his very first Pan Am Games title, Grenada’s Anderson Peters believes he has enough left in the tank for a podium bid at the IAAF World Championships in Doha, Qatar, in seven weeks’ time.

Kerrylee Ricketts coach of 2019 Pan Am Games silver medallist Shanieka Ricketts, said he was pleased with her performance and feels that a 15-metre jump is not that far away.

Four relays two medals represented the best the Caribbean could produce over the course of the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru.

Beginning on Friday, T&T copped silver in the men’s 4x100 metres before grabbing a bronze in the 4x400 men the following day.

Jamaica, usually a powerhouse with stick in hand, found the going tough and only managed a bronze over the four relay events, 4x100  and 4x400 men and women.

The Jamaicans earned their sole medal with the stick in the 4x400 women.

On Friday, T&T’s team of Keston Bledman, Jerod Elcock, Kyle Greaux, and Akanni Hislop clocked a season’s best 38.46 seconds to finish behind Brazil, who hit the tape in 38.27.

Jamaica finished fifth in 39.01 seconds.

On Saturday, Jamaica did a little better, crossing the tape in women’s 4x400 metres in 3:27.61 to finish behind the United States, 3:26.46, and Canada, 3:27.01.

The T&T men would match the exploits of the Jamaicans, earning a bronze medal in a time of 3:02.25.

They would finish behind Colombia, 3:01.41, and the United States, 3:01.72.

 

Michael Dyke, the head coach of Jamaican Junior sprint sensation Kevona Davis, says the 17-year-old speedster will not be forced into the senior ranks. 

Grenada’s Anderson Peters won a major battle against fellow Caribbean javelin thrower Keshorn Walcott at the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru on Saturday.

Peters would eventually throw 87.31 metres, breaking Cuba’s Guillermo Martinez’s eight-year-old Pan Am Games record to claim the win against Trinidad and Tobago’s Walcott, whose implement landed 83.55 metres away at its furthest.

Peters reached the mark with his first throw, finding his second best effort coming with his fourth throw, an 85.90 monster that would have won him the title anyway.

Walcott’s first throw was also his best, the Trinidad and Tobago Olympic champion finding trouble with getting back to his lofty 90-metre best.
St Lucia’s Albert Reynolds threw a personal best, 82.19 metres for third.

Fourth place went to the United States’ Michael Shuey, the only other thrower over 80 metres, with his 80.72.

There were two other Caribbean athletes in the event, with Grenada’s Markim Felix, 77.18, and Trinidad and Tobago’s Shakeil Waithe, 76.15, finishing fifth and sixth respectively.

Barbados’ Shane Brathwaite is the Pan American 110-metre hurdles champion after his exploits on Saturday in Lima, Peru.

Brathwaite, no stranger to big competition, stayed steady at the end of a tight race to get the better of the United States’ Freddie Crittenden III. The two went through the tape together, registering 13.31 and 13.32 seconds.

The American and the Barbadian separated themselves from the field with Brazil’s Eduardo Dos Santos Rodrigue, 13.48, taking him closest.

Another Barbadian, Greggmar Swift, was just short of a place on the podium, finishing in 13.51 for fourth.

The race wasn’t clean and the United States’ Jarret Eaton, as well as Brazil’s Gabriel Oliveira Constantin failed to finish, while Colombia’s Fanor Escobar and Cuba’s Roger Iribarne were disqualified.

Jamaica’s Shanieka Ricketts required a personal best to get anywhere near the dominance of Venezuela’s Yulimar Ojas in the women's triple jump at the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru on Friday. 

Jamaica have proven they are still a force to be reckoned with at the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru, with Aisha Praught-Leer giving the country another feather in its cap.

Praught-Leer, running in the women’s 1500 metres, managed a silver medal, coming through the taoe in 4:08.26 seconds.

The Jamaican finished behind the run of the United States’ Dominique Hiltz, who clocked 4:07.14 seconds for her gold medal.

Praught-Leer, in fact, split two Americans as Alexa Efraimson finished third in 4:08.63.

Of course, there were no other Caribbean athletes in the even save for Cuba’s Rose Mary Amanza Blanco, who finished seventh in 4:14.81

Trinidad and Tobago sprinter, Jereem Richards, has put his country on the podium yet again with a silver medal at the Pan American Games in Lima, Peru on Friday.

Running in the 200 metres, Richards had to work hard for 20.38 seconds, which was only good enougn for second behind the powerful finish of Ecuador’s Alex Quinonez, who hit the tape in 20.27.

The Dominican Republic’s Yancarlos Martinez was next, finishing in 20.44.

The three were better than Panama’s Reno Edward, who clocked 20.55 for fourth and Cuba’s Reynier Mena, who was fifth in 20.62.

The other Caribbean entrants, Roberto Skyers of Cuba, and Andre Ewers of Jamaica, were seventh and eighth respectively.

Skyers ended in 20.67, while Ewers could only manage 20.91.

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