Cameron wants to take fight for smaller cricketing nations to ICC

By July 27, 2020
Dave Cameron Dave Cameron

Former Cricket West Indies president Dave Cameron, who has signalled his intentions to run for the post of International Cricket Council (ICC) Chairman, says his bid represents the interests of the smaller cricketing nations.

During an interview on the ‘Good Morning Jojo Sports Show’, Cameron said even if his bid was not successful it would be his hope that successor to Shashank Manohar, would share his zeal for eradicating the economic disparity between big and small cricketing nations.

By big, Cameron spoke of Cricket Australia (CA), the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) and the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI).

“The system which exists within the ICC needs to be changed and I was there challenging that,” said Cameron.

According to Cameron, media rights is the arena in which the big three make a killing, to the exemption of smaller cricketing nations like the West Indies.

“Australia’s media rights for six years is 1.2 billion Australian dollars, the BCCI media rights for five years is 950 million for the international rights and 2.5 billion for IPL and the West Indies Cricket Board, if we’re lucky, will get about 50 million for the next five years,” he said.

With the much more open nature of access to information, Cameron believes ICC members like the West Indies must struggle to meet the demands of professional cricketers under the present conditions.

“What is happening to us is that our players are demanding to get paid the way Indian players, the Australian players and the English players are paid, and they’re right; they are doing the same amount of work but we are in different economies,” Cameron explained.

Cameron’s bid for ICC Chairman is timely, and he explains that timeliness in terms of having a seat at the table before there is another apportioning of media rights and the like that will disproportionately be split up.

“If we don’t do it now we are going into another eight-year cycle of ICC rights from 2023 to 2031 and I guarantee you that within three to five years, West Indies cricket and West Indies cricket players would be extinct,” he said.

“Don’t select me as chairman but make sure we select someone who’s willing to make changes within the ICC,” he said.

Manohar stepped down from the role of ICC Chairman just this month, with Singapore’s Imran Khawaja filling the post on an interim basis.

Khawaja, BCCI President Sourav Ganguly, and England’s Colin Graves are the men who Cameron wishes to challenge.

Graves has, for a long time, been touted as favourite to take over the role.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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    I’ve never been a fan of politics.

    The term has a number of definitions and I abhor involvement in any of the variations.

    Former Cricket West Indies boss, Dave Cameron, is now in the thick of a political fight he is not likely to win because he, like myself, may not be a fan of any of the definitions either and has not played the game well.

    The first definition of politics is basic. It speaks simply to activities associated with the governance of a body, area, country, whatever.

    That would suggest that part of being in a leadership role (governance), is being an effective politician.

    But politics also speaks to views. Your views on governance are your politics.

    Whenever your politics aren’t popular, you had better find a way to massage them into a room.

    Dave Cameron believed Cricket West Indies should be run like a business. He was well on his way to achieving that when he was ousted, but his politics and approach to seeing them through, meant he alienated many along the way.

    Included in that alienation were heads of government in the West Indies as well as the current CWI board.

    Now Cameron wants to run for International Cricket Council (ICC) Chairman and on the face of it, it looks like the former CWI president is missing the power he once wielded and seeks a way back.

    However, an aspect of his politics that has gone unchallenged, even while he was president of the CWI, is his wish to see an end to the ‘triopoly’ in world cricket.

    Cameron has made that issue the lynchpin of his argument for a seat at the head of the table.

    The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), and Cricket Australia (CA), dominate world cricket and all policies at the ICC level, including those involved with financial remuneration, seem to favour this big three.

    It is no wonder then, that the frontrunners to replace Shashank Manohar hail from two of the three powers. Saurav Ganguly is president of the BCCI and Colin Graves, the man touted as favourite for the quasi-vacant role, Colin Graves, is a former ECB boss.

    Here is where I part ways with politics. Well, we were never going in the same direction really.

    Cameron would like the support of the CWI to run for ICC Chairman and while the organisation has not given a response one way or the other, it is largely expected that he will not get it.

    Now the CWI board has had its issues with Cameron’s leadership style, with maybe his policies, but and this is a big but - Cameron represents the only chance for small teams like the West Indies to have their interests represented at the highest level.

    There is no doubt that Cameron has a point, particularly in respect to the division of money from television rights. The big three, granted they provide the biggest audiences, corner a large part of that market and the ensuing imbalance makes it difficult for smaller nations to invest in their cricket and advance to the lofty heights of the big three, creating ‘forever minnows’.

    Here is my question. Do you play politics ahead of issues, especially if that issue is as important to the future of cricket as it is?

    Outspoken former West Indies batsman Philo Wallace has said Cameron’s conundrum is one of his own making, and he may be right.

    Blessed or cursed with an incredible self-belief, Cameron comes across as arrogant, irreverent, and maybe a little despotic.

    It cost him the presidency of the CWI but I don’t believe like Wallace does, that “Dave Cameron should just tell himself ‘I’ve run West Indies cricket for six years' and just leave it out and just be an observer now, because going up for the ICC job and looking for the West Indies support, it can’t work.”

    I believe it should still be workable because what is best for West Indies cricket should be at the forefront of the minds of CWI president Ricky Skerritt and all the members of the board.

    Therefore, Cameron’s transgressions should be considered water under the bridge in the wake of a bigger fight.

    “It’s like trying to get a dumpling up a hill. Unfortunately, he isn’t going to get the support of Cricket West Indies and we all know it.  It’s very sad that a former president has come to this, a former president of West Indies cricket, but sometimes the way that you rule comes back to bite you, there is something called karma…he disrespected leaders and prime ministers in the region and that cannot work,” Wallace had said.

    But I have no time for politics, petty grievances or Karma.

    I do have time for a stronger West Indies cricket, whether or not I like the person who helps that process along.

  • ‘Sad to see Cameron come to this’ – former WI batsman says 'disrespectful' former CWI boss will never get support ‘Sad to see Cameron come to this’ – former WI batsman says 'disrespectful' former CWI boss will never get support

     Former West Indies and Barbados batsman, Philo Wallace, believes the combative leadership style of former CWI president Dave Cameron means he will never get the support of the current board, in his bid for ICC Chairman.

    Cameron has written to CWI, seeking its nomination to stay in contention for the position.  The former CWI boss had already received the nomination of The United States Cricket Hall of Fame for the post.

    The Cricket West Indies (CWI) board is, however, yet to decide on backing its former chairman, with current vice-president Dr. Kishore Shallow suggesting the body’s support for Cameron would be unlikely.  Nor does Wallace, for that matter, believe it should be expected, based on the often-stormy tenure of Cameron’s presidency.

    “I think it is going to be difficult for Cricket West Indies to support Dave Cameron in his bid to be ICC Chairman.  First of all, there is animosity between Cricket West Indies and Dave Cameron.  Those who are members or directors of Cricket West Indies will say there is, and he will find it very hard to get their support,” Wallace told the Mason and Guest radio program.

    “I honestly believe that Dave Cameron should just tell himself ‘i’ve run West Indies cricket for six years' and just leave it out and just be an observer now, because going up for the ICC job and looking for the West Indies support, it can’t work,” he added.

    The ICC is yet to finalise a nomination route for selecting the successor of Shashank Manohar following his resignation from the post of ICC Chairman after a two-year tenure.  Should he receive support, Cameron could go up against Former England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) head Colin Graves and president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) and former Indian skipper, Sourav Ganguly.

    “It’s like trying to get a dumpling up a hill.  Unfortunately, he isn’t going to get the support of Cricket West Indies and we all know it.  It’s very sad that a former president has come to this, a former president of West Indies cricket, but sometimes the way that you rule comes back to bite you, there is something called karma…he disrespected leaders and prime ministers in the region and that cannot work.”

     

     

  • Skerrit wants more former players at regional level Skerrit wants more former players at regional level

    Cricket West Indies president Ricky Skerritt wants to involve more former West Indies players in the process of recreating world-beating teams but believes there is a part of that process they are neglecting.

    According to Skerritt, the gap between first-class cricket in the region and international cricket is too great and that may be where past players would best be served.

    Speaking on the ‘Good Morning Jojo Sports Show recently, Skerritt said “the legends in their own home islands, it would be great if they could do more. Some of them would tell you that well, I have been living here for so many years and the cricket association president or whoever has never asked me to do anything, so people tend to sit back and wait to be asked because of bad experiences in the past or whatever.”

    It is the opinion of many who have an interest in seeing West Indies cricket develop that those who have contributed to the sport as players are being sidelined and their various experiences are going to waste.

    Skerritt says his administration has actively been trying to change that.

    “I can tell you that more of our former players have been engaged since I have been president and maybe some of them feel like they haven’t been engaged enough and I have no doubt they could be engaged more,” he said.

     “[ … ] but the people who really operate across the region and for whatever reasons that gap is just too huge,” said the CWI president.

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