Windies Women eager to re-experience World Cup winning feeling claims skipper Taylor

By Sports Desk February 12, 2020

West Indies Women’s captain Stafanie Taylor has hopes of re-experiencing the dizzying heights of capturing the ICC T20 World Cup title, as the team prepares to embark on the upcoming campaign.

The regional team shocked the cricket world after defeating heavily favoured Australia in the 2016 final.  The 28-year-old Windies skipper has freely admitted that reflecting on the unexpected triumph years later still fills her with a sense of pride and is eager to replicate it.

“I have played a lot of games over the years but the memories of India 2016 stand out so much,” Taylor told the ICC Cricket.

“Looking back on it, I’m just hoping that we can replicate it again this year – both the feeling that we had as a team and the impact that individual players had on the tournament from start to finish,” she added.

“Four years ago was a perfect storm for us. We really wanted to win, and I think we left all we had on the field throughout the tournament, especially in the final against Australia.

“This time around, we just need to do that again, play our game and push until the last ball to see how far that can take us. Winning the title and bringing the trophy back to the West Indies would be success for us.”

The West Indies Women will hope to emulate the feats of the men’s team who are two-time winners of the competition.

 

 

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