CWI appoint sign respected T20 analyst A.R. Srikkanth to two-year contract

By November 14, 2019

A.R. Srikkanth, one of the world’s leading T20 cricket analysts, has been appointed as the new West Indies Men’s Team Analyst, on a two-year contract.

Srikkanth has worked in the India Premier League (IPL), Pakistan Super League (PSL), Caribbean Premier League (CPL), Bangladesh Premier League (BPL) and Global T20 Canada.

He is also no stranger to West Indies players having worked with Sunil Narine, Andre Russell, Chris Gayle, Jason Holder and Rovman Powell for Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) since the inception of IPL and the Trinbago Knight Riders (TRK) since the Red Chillies Entertainment ownership, took over the three-time CPL winners in 2015.

Srikanth’s role with the West Indies will be in addition to his roles with KKR and TKR.

“I’m really pleased to have ‘Sri’ on board. He has a wealth of experience, especially in T20 cricket, and with two T20 World Cups in the next two years, his expertise and knowledge will be invaluable as we look to defend our title in Australia next November. An important part of his role will also be to assist in the training and development of our analysts in the Caribbean,” said West Indies Head Coach, Phil Simmons while reacting to the appointment.

Srikkanth joined the team in Lucknow ahead of the first T20 International against Afghanistan that the West Indies won by 30 runs on Thursday.

The Team Management Unit also includes Roddy Estwick as the bowling coach; John Mooney as fielding coach for the white-ball formats against Afghanistan; while Rayon Griffith will replace Mooney for the Test match against Afghanistan as well as the white-ball series against India in December.

Experienced strength and conditioning coach, Ronald Rogers rejoins the team’s medical staff, which also includes physio Denis Byam and massage therapist Zephyrinus Nicholas. Rogers has worked with West Indies team for close to two decades and brings a wealth of experience to the post.

CWI is also in the process of securing the services of a batting coach to join the team for the upcoming series. This announcement will be made in the coming days.

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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