Gayle focused on mental game ahead of World Cup

By Sports Desk May 15, 2019
Windies star Chris Gayle. Windies star Chris Gayle.

Windies veteran batsman Chris Gayle has admitted to focusing on his mental preparation, ahead of even the physical aspects as his final World Cup appearance looms on the horizon.

Despite being one of the oldest players heading to the tournament, the 39-year-old has been in solid form in recent months.  In this season’s IPL Gayle has scored 490 runs in 13 matches but really stood out for the recent England series in the Caribbean.  The veteran batsman was named man of the series after amassing 429 runs in four matches at an average of 106.  The player believes keeping fresh has been key.

"I am just taking a lot of rest, getting a lot of massages, lots of stretching, just trying to stay fresh for games. I know what is required to keep me going on the field," Chris Gayle told PTI.

"Age catches up as you ain't getting any younger. But most important thing for me is the mental part of the game. It is not so much about the physical side of the game anymore. I have not done much fitness in the last couple of months," said the Windies veteran.

"I use my experience and mental aspect. I have not done gym for some time," said Chris Gayle.

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    Garry Sobers is regarded as the greatest all-rounder in the history of cricket.

    The West Indies legend burst onto the Test scene at just 17, setting the stage for a remarkable career.

    His debut for his country came on March 30 back in 1954.

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    The most remarkable display of Sobers' batting credentials came in his stunning 365 not out against Pakistan.

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    Compiling a big score is one thing, but consistently racking up runs is the real test of talent.

    The numbers favour Sobers on that front, too. His average of 57.8 again puts him top of the pile.

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    SOBERS THE CENTURY KING

    In 160 Test innings, Sobers recorded 26 centuries.

    While that figure pales next to Kallis' 45, the Proteas great took 280 innings to reach that tally.

    That means Sobers triumphs again in this category, with 16.3 per cent of his innings producing scores of 100 or more, with Kallis standing at 16.1 per cent.

    Nobody else on the list can boast a double-figure percentage, with Botham on 8.7 and Miller on 8.
     

    HANDY WITH THE BALL

    Sobers claimed 235 wickets from 159 Test innings with the ball.

    In this area, at least, he does have to take a back seat to some more prolific wicket-taking all-rounders.

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    BEST FIGURES STAND UP

    With best figures of 6-73, Sobers compares favourably with his competitors. 

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    Sobers' best match figures are 8-80, with Hadlee the proud owner of a 15-wicket haul.

    With 36 five-fors, Hadlee also leads the way on that score, with Botham (27) followed by Khan and Dev (both 23).

    Sobers', meanwhile, had just six five-fors.


    NOBODY IS PERFECT

    Although the data clearly supports Sobers' status as the GOAT, there is one category in which he comes last.

    His bowling average - still a very commendable 34 - is a long way short of the 22.3 that belongs to Hadlee.

    Khan (22.8) and Miller (23) are also a long way ahead of Sobers.

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