Windies batsman Pooran hoping for big World Cup impact

By Sports Desk May 01, 2019
Windies batsman Nicholas Pooran. Windies batsman Nicholas Pooran.

Four years after suffering a serious car injury, Windies batsman Nicholas Pooran has high hopes of playing a big part for the team at this month’s ICC World Cup in England.

The 23-year-old Trinidad and Tobago native was named as part of a 15-man squad, which will travel to England determined to make a mark on the tournament in a few days’ time.  However, the position he now finds himself in is quite remarkable considering the fact that two years ago he was left to wonder if he would ever walk again.  After returning from training in Port of Spain, Pooran ruptured his left patellar tendon and fractured his ankle.  The injuries left the player sidelined for several months.

“West Indies has a lot of talented players like it has always had. Obviously, things are shaping well for the World Cup and we are looking forward to it. Hope I do a great job,” Pooran said.

“The conditions in England will obviously be colder. The one thing would be to (understand) the conditions and then adjusting (accordingly) to the longer format of the game. This is our job, and this is what we do day in and out, so we have to (realize) the situation and get ready for the World Cup.”

 

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