Haynes appointment to CWI selection panel leaves Scorpions without a head

By April 13, 2019
New Windies chief selector Robert Haynes New Windies chief selector Robert Haynes

The Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) will, in short order, be advertising for the post of a head coach for the Jamaica Scorpions after losing Robert Haynes to regional duty. 

Haynes, the former Jamaica and West Indies spinner, was last week appointed chief selector of the Windies and was forced to give up his role with the Scorpions.

He will take over the role and be joined on a three-man panel, including Cricket West Indies director of cricket, Jimmy Adams, and Floyd Reifer, who is now the team's head coach. 

Haynes had said he intended to stay in the post after taking over on an interim basis from Robert Samuels in December of 2018, even though the Scorpions had yet another woeful run in the West Indies Championship.

The decision to choose Haynes, who has been a selector on previous occasions, means there could be a window for Andre Coley, whose contract with the Leeward Islands Hurricanes is set to come to an end this year. Coley has expressed an interest in the now-vacant Scorpions role.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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