Gayle regrets 'reckless' shot despite whirlwind 162

By February 27, 2019
Windies star Chris Gayle. Windies star Chris Gayle.

Windies batting star Chris Gayle has lamented a ‘reckless’ shot, despite a whirlwind knock of 162 against England in a losing cause at the Grenada National Stadium on Wednesday.

In pursuit of a sizable target of 418, which was anchored by a smashing innings from Englishman Jos Butler, it was Gayle who launched a fierce response of his own. 

The big left-hander fell just short of his record of 16 sixes in an ODI innings, when he slammed 14 over the boundary rope in a battling effort at the crease.  Gayle was dismissed after missing against Ben Stokes.

In the end, it was not enough to stave off a loss for the Windies who fell just 29 runs short of the sizable total but few could argue it was an effort to be proud of.  The 39-year-old became only the second batsman to reach 300 runs, with the performance pushing him to 305, second to only Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi (351).  The total, the 25th century of the batsman’s career was his second highest total in the format.

"I didn't know what was going to happen. Normally when chasing a big total, you give yourself less overs to get in,” Gayle said following the match,

"It was a good wicket and once you get momentum as a batter, you are going to get runs,” he added.

"Wood bowled well. With his pace, he's always going to be somebody to be wary of. After losing two quick wickets, I said we had to build a partnership but the shot I played, in the end, was a bit reckless. If I had batted deeper, who knows what might have happened?"

Kwesi Mugisa

Kwesi has been a sports journalist with more than 10-years’ experience in the field. First as a Sports Reporter with The Gleaner in the early 2000s before he made the almost natural transition to becoming an editor. Since then he has led the revamp of The Star’s sports offering, making it a more engaging and forward-thinking component of the most popular tabloid newspaper in the Caribbean.

Related items

  • How Trevor Bayliss kept England focused for World Cup finals How Trevor Bayliss kept England focused for World Cup finals
  • Australia paper loses appeal against Gayle - must pay Windies star $200k Australia paper loses appeal against Gayle - must pay Windies star $200k

    An Australia court has thrown out an appeal by media group Fairfax, which would have annulled damages owed to Windies star Chris Gayle who won a defamation suit against the entity last year.

    Gayle took the publishers to court after allegations that he exposed himself to a female masseuse during the 2015 World Cup came out in several of its publications.  More specifically, it was alleged that the batsman exposed his penis and indecently propositioned the woman in a dressing room during the tournament.

    The jury sided with the player, who strongly denied the allegations, in finding that the publishers acted with malice and accorded the cricketer damages amounting to US$211,000.  In its appeal, however, Fairfax argued that the jury should have been discharged after Gayle’s attorney attacked the credibility of the masseuse.  In response, the player’s legal team had appealed to increase the size of the payout to the West Indian star. Both appeals were dismissed.

     Fairfax newspapers are now owned by commercial broadcaster Nine Entertainment, which purchased the media company last year.

  • New Zealand coach expects ICC to review rules after crazy Cricket World Cup finale New Zealand coach expects ICC to review rules after crazy Cricket World Cup finale

    New Zealand head coach Gary Stead expects the ICC to review the rules that led to the Black Caps losing the Cricket World Cup final to England courtesy of an inferior boundary count.

    In an extraordinary final at Lord's on Sunday, England ultimately prevailed after both teams had made 241 runs from 50 overs and 15 in the subsequent Super Over shootout.

    Many observers felt another one-over eliminator would have represented a fairer way to decide the winners, rather than the champions being determined by the number of boundaries hit during the contest.

    "I'm sure there's going to be many things they [the ICC] will look at over the whole tournament," Stead was quoted as saying by stuff.co.nz. "I'm sure when they're writing the rules they never expect the World Cup final to happen like that so I'm sure it'll be reviewed, absolutely."

    "The technicalities and stuff around the rules, they're different in all tournaments. We knew what it was, we were just one run short. It's a very, very hollow feeling that you can play 100 overs and score the same amount of runs and still lose the game. But that's the technicalities of sport sometimes."

    The Super Over was only required after England benefited from an extraordinary slice of good fortune towards the end of their initial run-chase.

    As he raced back to complete a second run with nine needed from three balls, Ben Stokes inadvertently deflected the ball to the boundary rope, ensuring England were awarded six runs.

    Former umpire Simon Taufel claimed England should actually have been given five runs rather than six, as Stokes and Adil Rashid had not crossed at the point Martin Guptill threw the ball in.

    "I didn't actually know that," said Stead. "At the end of the day the umpires are there to rule and they're human as well and like players sometimes errors are made.

    "That's just the human aspect of sport and probably why we care so much as well."

© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.