Cameron’s response to presidency challenge, petty – Skerritt

By February 25, 2019
Ricky Skerritt Ricky Skerritt

Ricky Skerritt, the man who plans on challenging Whycliffe Dave Cameron for presidency of Cricket West Indies (CWI) has reacted to the incumbent’s opinion of his competence in no uncertain terms. 

Cameron had called Skerritt’s time as team manager of the Cricket West Indies ‘that period of turmoil’, referring, possibly to his resignation where he said he was not able to get the team to understand its obligations on and off the field despite his best efforts.

Skerritt has labelled the comments disappointing but not unsurprising.

According to Skerritt, who managed the team from 2000 to 2004, there was no ‘turmoil’.

“While I was team manager there was zero industrial unrest by players,” said Skerritt.

“We were proud ambassadors for West Indies cricket globally. This period was a time when we were still winning more matches than we lost and players were still respected by the CWI leadership. Instead of making such unfounded and petty attacks on me I recommend that Mr. Cameron hold audience with former players and ask about their experiences and existing relationships with me. But relationships with facts and truth apparently mean little to Cameron.”

Skerritt then turned the tables on Cameron, suggesting the ‘turmoil’ he speaks of has been more prevalent in his tenure as president.

“If Cameron wants to talk about turmoil, perhaps he can explain why former Head Coaches, Otis Gibson, Phil Simmons, and the several others who Cameron hastily and summarily dismissed, from both the men’s and women’s teams, have collectively cost CWI well over US $1Million.”

According to Skerritt, the Windies pull-out on the tour of India and Darren Sammy’s public challenge of the board after winning World T20 title for the second time as captain, are far more glaring examples of ‘turmoil’.

Both experiences according to Skerritt were “stimulated and mismanaged directly by Cameron’s insensitivity and stubbornness.”

“These tumultuous instances have caused significant damage to the CWI reputation, commercial health, and team performance. Cameron really should not allow the subject of ‘turmoil’ to become the feature of this campaign,” said Skerritt.

Skerritt and Dr Kishore Shallow, who is challenging Emmanuel Nanthan for the post of CWI vice-president, have launched a 10-point manifesto called ‘Cricket First’, designed to, according to the two, put the West Indies back on a path to being consistently competitive.

“The opportunity to rescue Cricket West Indies is now. It is imperative we change the narrative of our cricket, in the West Indies and globally, by rebuilding relationships with our best and brightest players in order to bring our passionate fans back to the game. This starts with credible, innovative leadership that listens,” said Swallow.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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