England chase just 290 despite Hetmyer century, Gayle half-century

By February 22, 2019
Windies batsman Shimron Hetmyer punches the air after scoring a century against England during their second One Day International match at the Kensington Oval in Barbados. Windies batsman Shimron Hetmyer punches the air after scoring a century against England during their second One Day International match at the Kensington Oval in Barbados.

Despite a century from Shimron Hetmyer, the Windies will still have it all to do to get back into their One Day International series against England after ending the first innings of their second game at Kensington Oval on 289-6. 

Hetmyer, rampaged his way to 104 from just 83 deliveries, while opener Chris Gayle scored a more sedate 50 from 63 deliveries before he was bowled by Adil Rashid.

The innings, despite those two performances, was a stop-start one, thanks in large part to the fielding of the England team, Rashid running out Darren Bravo after the middle-order batsman had gotten to 25 and Jason Roy, throwing down the stumps to remove skipper Jason Holder.

In fact, there were a number of scores like that, with the Windies batsmen getting starts but failing to go on.

John Campbell, 23, and Shai Hope, 33, all failing to carry on after seemingly setting themselves.

Gayle, as is his usual style these days, took a while to begin clearing the ropes, his half ton including four sixes and a boundary.

Hetmyer also hit four sixes and had seven boundaries.

There was also a good innings from Ashley Nurse who scored 13, in helping Hetmyer to get to the milestone.

Mark Wood bowled well, his 10 overs costing just 38 runs. He would end with a wicket as well. Liam Plunkett ended with figures of 1-39 from seven overs, Ben Stokes was a little expensive at 1-62 from 10 and Rashid ended with 1-28 from six overs.

Both openers for England, Jonny Bairstow (0) and Roy (2) are back in the pavilion with Sheldon Cottrell having taken two wickets.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

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