Bravo set to rejoin Windies Test squad after two-year absence

By Sports Desk January 15, 2019
Windies batsman Darren Bravo. Windies batsman Darren Bravo.

Out-of-favour batsman Darren Bravo is set to rejoin the Windies Test team for the first time in two years having been selected for the upcoming series against England.

The 29-year-old Bravo has often been considered one of the region’s most promising prospects in the game’s longest format, an area that has seen the team struggle mightily in recent years.  Bravo, however, ran afoul of the cricket board in 2016 after a tweet that called CWI president Dave Cameron a ‘big idiot’ surfaced on his Twitter profile during a contract dispute.

Following talks late last year the way was clear for the player to return to the unit and was recalled to the Windies one-day squad but was yet to be included in the longest format. 

Bravo is expected to be joined by debutants John Campbell, a 26-year-old left-handed opener from Jamaica, and Shamarh Brooks, the former West Indies Under-19 captain. 

Windies chairman of selectors Courtney Brown insisted on the back of disappointing tour of Bangladesh that the time was right for changes with the series coming up on home soil.

"After a difficult Test Series in Bangladesh late last year the opportunity presents itself for our team to pick itself up," said Brown.

 "Although a tough series against England is anticipated, home turf has always been a place where our team has made strides."

Related items

  • Duckworth-Lewis-Stern co-developer Tony Lewis dies aged 78 Duckworth-Lewis-Stern co-developer Tony Lewis dies aged 78

    Tony Lewis, who co-developed the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern system utilised in cricket, has died, the ICC confirmed on Thursday.

    Lewis passed away at the age of 78. He developed the original Duckworth-Lewis method alongside fellow statistician Frank Duckworth.

    The ICC has used the formula – which calculates the target score for a team batting second in an interrupted limited-overs match – since 1999.

    After the retirements of Lewis and Duckworth, Steven Stern became the custodian of the method and his name was added in 2014.

    "Tony's contribution to cricket is huge. The present day system of resetting targets in international cricket is based on the one developed by him and Frank more than two decades ago," said ICC general manager Geoff Allardice.

    "His contribution to the game of cricket will be remembered for years to come and we send our condolences to his family and friends."

  • World unions will unite to help Australia, says RFU chief World unions will unite to help Australia, says RFU chief

    Rugby Football Union (RFU) chief executive Bill Sweeney said boards across the world want to help Rugby Australia (RA) after it reported financial problems amid the coronavirus pandemic.

    With rugby union leagues and competitions being shut down in a bid to combat the spread of COVID-19, RA stood down 75 per cent of its working staff for three months earlier this week, shortly after it had revealed a provisional deficit of 9.4 million Australian dollars in 2019.

    USA Rugby has also filed for bankruptcy, claiming the suspensions caused by coronavirus, and the uncertainty about the future, had accelerated financial problems.

    Sweeney conceded those announcements have caused concern among the world's unions, who are trying to collaborate on potential solutions to aid those struggling.

    "The USA, quite frankly, were struggling somewhat before the crisis hit anyway – so they were perhaps the most vulnerable of anybody," Sweeney explained.

    "I know World Rugby are in conversations with them in terms of how they can sustain the game in that country.

    "Australia have been reported as being in a weaker position than a lot of others.

    "There is an unprecedented amount of dialogue going on between all the unions and the relationship between the north and the south [hemispheres] has probably never been better, and we are just looking at various ways we can structure things that everybody can benefit and find solutions to these challenges ahead.

    "It's in no one's interest for Australia to get into even more serious difficulties."

    Eddie Jones' England are due to tour Japan in July for a two-Test series against the Brave Blossoms.

    However, given the Olympics - staged in Tokyo - has already been put back a year to July 2021, it would appear unlikely England will embark on that tour when scheduled.

    "We are in regular dialogue with World Rugby and a lot of the other unions as well around the world," Sweeney added.

    "This is a conversation we are having around the July tours. It's a bit too early to say. We expect to be able to make a decision on that towards the end of April."

  • Eddie Jones: The England coach's most memorable quotes Eddie Jones: The England coach's most memorable quotes

    With Eddie Jones having extended his contract until the end of the 2023 Rugby World Cup, England fans can look forward to the Australian providing more special moments.

    Jones led England to the Six Nations Grand Slam in 2016 - his first tournament at the helm - and they were champions again a year later, while only a defeat to South Africa stopped them winning last year's Rugby World Cup.

    The 60-year-old made his side one of the best in the sport, and with his calculated wit and sharp tongue he arguably provides the best off-the-pitch entertainment in rugby.

    We look back at some of Jones' most memorable quotes.

     

    "Well, guys, can you just send my best wishes to Warren to make sure he enjoys the third and fourth place play-off."

    Jones' response when Wales coach Warren Gatland, who saw his team defeated by South Africa in the last four, suggested England could have already played their World Cup final when they beat New Zealand in the semis.

    “I think the term 'world class' is used lightly. To be world class, you've got to be an automatic selection in a world XV. We don’t have any of those players. Now, we've got a lot of good players and a lot of players who want to get better. So to say we don't have world class players is not a criticism of the players and not a criticism of the team. It's just the reality of it."

    Having said England had no "world-class players" upon his appointment in 2015, Jones was adamant it remained the case after racking up 13 straight Test wins to start his tenure.

    "France can expect absolute brutality from England, we are going to go out there to make sure they understand what Test rugby is. It is about being brutal, it is about being physical."

    Jones laid down the gauntlet ahead of England's 2020 Six Nations opener against France and it backfired, as Les Bleus clinched a 24-17 victory in Paris.

    "No one thinks we can win. New Zealand talk about walking towards pressure - well, this week the pressure is going to be chasing them down the street. The busiest bloke in Tokyo this week will be Gilbert Enoka, their mental skills coach. They have to deal with all this pressure of winning the World Cup three times. It is potentially the last game for their greatest coach and their greatest captain and they will be thinking about those things. Those thoughts go through your head. It is always harder to defend a World Cup, and they will be thinking about that, and therefore there is pressure."

    After suggesting New Zealand had sent a spy to watch England train ahead of their World Cup semi-final clash, Jones turned up the heat on the All Blacks.

    "I just went through immigration and I got shunted through the area where everything got checked. That's what I'm expecting, mate. Everything that's done around the game is going to be coordinated. All coordinated to help Australia win. We've got to be good enough to control what we can control."

    Jones claimed Australia were going to make England's life as difficult as possible after arriving for a three-Test tour in June 2016.

    "We control our own destiny. We want to go out there and smack Italy. I have told the boys already that that is our aim - to go out there and give them a good hiding. If you look at the rankings we are a better side than Italy. We have to prove that on Sunday. We want to be absolutely brutal up front so there is no Italian player left standing at the end of the game."

    Ahead of only his second game in charge, Jones made it clear he expected a significant increase in physicality from his players.

    "We've played 23 Tests and we've only lost one Test to the scummy Irish. I'm still dirty about that game but we'll get that back, don't worry."

    England were hoping to deny Ireland the Grand Slam in their final 2018 Six Nations game and Jones was out for revenge after they inflicted the first defeat of his tenure. He later apologised for the comment and Ireland triumphed 24-15 at Twickenham.

    "If he was Sexton then we'd be able to complain about him. But because he's Owen Farrell he's allowed to be hit late. He's tough so he gets up and he plays. He's a tough rooster, a warrior. He takes the ball to the line, he puts his body on the line, he doesn't play in a dinner suit."

    Jones suggested Owen Farrell's determination to play through pain led to him getting less protection from referees than Ireland fly-half Johnny Sexton.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.