By the time Dwayne Bravo had scored his first One-Day International ton in 2006, his credentials as a bonified allrounder with real talent and skill had already been understood world over.

His batting has always suggested there was more there but it was his bowling that showed an incomparable depth. He has left many batsman swinging for the fences with full slower deliveries that inexplicably drop from the sky leaving them half-way through a shot and nowhere near the pitch of the ball.

Bravo’s statistics as an international cricketer, though, have been watered down by, injuries, controversy, and the lure of T20 Leagues with deep pockets.

This has meant intermittent international cricket for Bravo, and possibly a place among the great allrounders of the game from the region.

That said, Bravo is still playing and on the cusp of producing figures any allrounder would be proud of.

With a best of 6-43, Bravo has taken 199 wickets in ODI cricket at an average of 29.51 and with a strike rate of 32.7. He only averages 25 with the bat and has two centuries and 10 half-centuries to his name.

If there is anywhere his game has not lived up to its true potential, it is there with the bat. In the field, Bravo is also a lightning rod for brilliant moments. He is fast over the outfield and athletic. He is also a safe pair of hands anywhere on the field and will run you out if you take a chance to him.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Dwayne John Bravo

Born: October 7, 1983, Santa Cruz, Trinidad

Major teams: West Indies, Carib Beer XI, Chennai Super Kings, Chittagong Kings, Comilla Victorians, Dhaka Dynamites, DJ Bravo's XI, Dolphins, Essex, Gujarat Lions, ICC World XI, Kent, Lahore Qalandars, Maratha Arabians, Melbourne Renegades, Melbourne Stars, Middlesex, Mumbai Indians, Paarl Rocks, Peshawar Zalmi, Quetta Gladiators, RR Sarwan's XI, SC Joseph's XI, Shell Cricket Academy Invitation XI, Surrey, Sydney Sixers, Trinbago Knight Riders, Trinidad & Tobago, Trinidad & Tobago Red Steel, Trinidad & Tobago XI, University of West Indies Vice Chancellor's XI, UWI Vice Chancellor's Celebrity XI, UWI Vice Chancellor's XI, Victoria, West Indies A, West Indies Board President's XI, West Indies Board XI, Winnipeg Hawks

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

 

ODI Career (batting): West Indies (2004-2014)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS      Ave       BF       SR      100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct

164     141      24     2968      112*   25.36     3606   82.30      2       10      240     58      73      

 

ODI Career (bowling): West Indies (2004-2014)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs          Wkts   BBI     BBM          Ave    Econ   SR          4w     5w     10w

164    150    6511 5874          199    6/43 6/43          29.51 5.41   32.7          6       1       0

 

 

Career Highlights

  • In 164 ODI’s, he scored 2,968 runs at an average of 25.36
  • Picked up 199 wickets at an average of 29.52
  • 1 of 3 players to have 1000 runs and 50 wickets in each format of the game

Lance Klusener’s swing-for-the-fences approach to batting has fooled many into underscoring his technical ability with the bat, while his military medium pace makes many forget that at one time, the big South African once had enough purchase on his deliveries to either bowl you fullish deliveries or have you fending off bouncers.

With the drop in his pace, Klusener, who was a number-11 batsman, to begin with, adapted well, his average of 41.10 suggesting he could bat more than a bit.

He would score two centuries and 19 half-centuries in his 171-match ODI career. But even with his diminished pace, Klusener was a handful with the ball as well, taking 192 scalps in his career at an average of 29.95. On six occasion he had four wickets or more in a match, suggesting he had the ability to singlehandedly generate a favourable result for South Africa.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Lance Klusener

Born: September 4, 1971, Durban, Natal

Major teams: South Africa, Dolphins, Kolkata Tigers, KwaZulu-Natal, Middlesex, Mountaineers, Natal, Natal Country Districts, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rest of the World XI

Playing role: Allrounder

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast-medium

 

ODI Career (batting): South Africa (1996-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS      Ave      BF        SR       100s     50s    4s      6s   

171      137     50      3576      103*   41.10    3977     89.91       2      19      293    76   

 

ODI Career (bowling): South Africa (1996-2004)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs    Wkts   BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ   SR      4w     5w    10w

171      164     7336   5751     192    6/49    6/49     29.95   4.70    38.2      1       6       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Scored 3,576 runs at an overage of 41.10
  • Player of the 1999 World Cup tournament
  • Picked up 192 wickets at an average of 29.95
  • He picked up six 5 wicket hauls in ODIs

At no time has Jacques Kallis’ ability as an allrounder and the importance he had in the South African side of the late 1990s and early 2000s been more obvious than was the case when he faced the West Indies in the Wills International Cup.

The competition, which later became known as the ICC Champions Trophy, featured Kallis in the semi-final singlehandedly dismissing the West Indies, first slamming 113 from 100 deliveries before bagging 5-30 with the ball to boot them from the tournament.

He would perform feats of that nature for years to come, and at the World Cup in the Caribbean was South Africa’s leading scorer, notching 485 of them.

But his ODI career, as was the case when he played Test cricket, started slowly. It took two years before he scored his first international ton in the format, scoring 111 against New Zealand at the WACA.

While his strike rate of 72.89 could be higher, it could also be said that Kallis understood that his South Africa needed him to bat that way if they were to do well. His 11,579 runs perhaps tells a better story about Kallis’ importance to South Africa. Add that to his 273 wickets from 283 innings with the ball, and you have the stuff of legends.   

 

Career Statistics

ODI Career (batting): South Africa (1996-2014)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs      HS     Ave      BF          SR       100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct         

328       314    53     11579     139    44.36    15885     72.89     17      86       911    137    131   

 

ODI Career (bowling): South Africa (1996-2014)

Mat    Inns    Balls   Runs          Wkts   BBI     BBM          Ave    Econ   SR          4w     5w     10w

328    283    10750          8680 273    5/30          5/30 31.79 4.84          39.3   2       2          0

 

Career highlights

  • Only player over 10,000 runs and 250 wickets in both ODIs and Tests
  • Involved in 50 century partnerships in his ODI career
  • 2nd player to have 10,000 runs and 250 wickets in ODIs
  • Has received 32 Man of the Match awards in ODIs

Had Marva Holder been alive she would have been a very proud grandmother.

On Wednesday, her grandson, Chemar Holder, received a call from Cricket West Indies for his first tour with the men’s senior team that will play three Tests in England starting July 8.

For Holder, the leading pace bowler in the West Indies Championships that concluded in March, it was a dream come true.

“It was a good feeling yesterday (Wednesday) when I got the call to know that I was included in the 15. It was something that I was always looking forward to and now I have got the opportunity to represent my country.”

Holder, 22, took 36 wickets at a healthy average of 18.91 during the championships that was ended with two rounds to go because of the Coronavirus pandemic, leaving him just four wickets shy of the target he had set at the start of the season.

Nonetheless, the West Indies selectors rewarded him with a place in the senior squad that is set to play the ‘bio-secure’ Tests series.

“Chemar Holder is an exciting young fast bowling talent who is coming off an excellent domestic First-Class season. He should enjoy bowling in English conditions. He could prove a real asset to the team in England,” said Roger Harper, Cricket West Indies Chief Selector.

Coming from a cricket-loving family, Holder has always enjoyed their support.

“If things are not going well, they all talk to me, tell me to keep my head up, everything is not going to be the same,” he said. “So I always get support from them, especially my grandmother, who passed away. She was always my big supporter.

“She stayed up all night and watched me during the U19 World Cup. Every time I play I remember her so she would be happy to find out this news if she was alive today.”

Marva Holder passed away in 2016 at the age of 72.

 

 

There was not much dissension when a panel of experts selected India’s Mahendra Singh Dhoni to be the man they put forward as the Ultimate ODI XI wicketkeeper.

Dhoni got the better of players like Australia’s Adam Gilchrist, the Ultimate XI Test wicketkeeper, and Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara.

The clincher, for both the panel and the Zone, is Dhoni’s ability, not with the gloves, but to figure out what course of action to take in a run chase and largely come out on the winning side.

It was revealed on the SportsMax Zone yesterday that Dhoni has had successful run chases with him at the crease for India 96% of the time. Chances are if Dhoni is at the crease, India will win.

That was more important to the panel than the tremendous glovework of South Africa’s Mark Boucher, or the pinch-hitting ability of Adam Gilchrist. Those two are considered the greatest wicketkeepers of all time. However, the panel believes Dhoni is the greatest wicketkeeper-batsman the ODI game has ever seen.

More important than the panel and the Zone, are the Fanalysts, so says the weighting around the votes.

Fanalysts have 40% of the vote for who gets into SportsMax’s Ultimate XI, with the panel and the Zone, enjoying 30% each.

With that 40% of the votes, the Fanalysts have chosen to agree with the Zone and the panel for the most part. Yesterday was no exception.

In fact, Dhoni’s 46.29% to Kumar Sangakkara’s 17.14% of the votes represents the biggest margin of victory since the Ultimate XI began two months ago.

With that pick, the Fanalysts team so far includes Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as openers, Virat Kohli, Brian Lara, and AB de Villiers as the middle order, and Dhoni as the wicketkeeper.

The Zone and panel, however, have gone with Viv Richards in the place of Lara.

This evening, the panel and Zone will be voting on the Ultimate ODI team’s allrounder, with Fanalysts already seeming to decide on Jacques Kallis.

Veteran batsman Darren Bravo and newcomers Keemo Paul and Shimron Hetmyer will not face any backlash from Cricket West Indies for their decision not to travel to England for the three-Test series in July.

As was reported by Sportsmax.TV on Tuesday, Cricket West Indies' (CWI) selection panel named a 14-man Test squad for the proposed Sandals Tour of England 2020 that features newcomers Chemar Holder and Nkrumah Bonner.

The selectors have also named 11 reserves for the tour that includes fast bowlers Shannon Gabriel and Oshane Thomas.

The 22-year-old Holder – who is not related to captain Jason Holder – was the leading fast bowler in the West Indies Championship with 36 wickets in eight matches at 18.91 each, and was one of the successful ICC U-19 World Cup-winning side in 2016.

Bonner, 31, will be making his Test squad debut after being one of the leading batsmen in the 2020 West Indies Championship with 523 runs in seven matches at an average of 58.11.  He has previously represented the West Indies when he played two T20 Internationals back in 2011 and 2012.

Subject to the final approval of the UK Government, the West Indies will defend the Wisden Trophy in three back-to-back Test matches to be played behind closed doors,  starting on July 8.   The touring party that will all be tested for COVID-19 this week, is scheduled to fly to England on private charters on June 8.

According to CWI, the West Indies squad will live, train and play in a “bio-secure” environment during the seven weeks of the tour, as part of the comprehensive medical and operations plans to ensure player and staff safety.

The bio-secure protocols will restrict movement in and out of the venues, so the selection panel has also named a list of reserve players who will travel to train and help prepare the Test squad and ensure replacements are available in case of any injury.

Chief selector Roger Harper explained that the squad will have the time to get accustomed to the new norm in the UK but feels that they have selected a competitive squad.

“The new cricketing environment will take some getting used to. However, being in England and working together for four weeks before the first Test will give the squad the opportunity to get acclimatized and hopefully, mentally and technically adjusted to the demands of the new environment. Playing in July could be a blessing as the weather is likely to be warmer which will allow the squad more of an opportunity to play its best cricket,” he said.

“I think we have a squad that will be very competitive. More than half of the squad were involved in the victorious Test series against England in the Caribbean last year so they will bring that experience, that knowledge and belief with them and marry it to the enthusiasm and vitality of the newcomers.

“The experience of the players who toured England before in 2017 will also benefit the squad greatly. I expect that the bowling unit will once again provide a serious challenge for England and our batting will have to deliver. England is a tough team when playing in home conditions, however, I think the West Indies has a good chance of retaining the Wisden Trophy. We will have to bat consistently well to do so.”

Harper believes newcomers Holder and Bonner will benefit greatly from the tour.

“Chemar Holder is an exciting young fast bowling talent who is coming off an excellent domestic First-Class season. He should enjoy bowling in English conditions. He could prove a real asset to the team in England,” Harper said.

 “Nkrumah Bonner is an unflappable character. His ability to hold the innings together and bat through tight situations could serve the team very well.

“Jermaine Blackwood returns by sheer weight of performance in the domestic First-Class season. His patience and application were evident and that resulted in much greater consistency which I look forward to him taking back into the Test arena. His experience of playing Test cricket in England should stand him in good stead.”  

The chief selector also shed light on the inclusion of allrounder Raymon Reifer and Shannon Gabriel who is returning after undergoing surgery.

“Raymon Reifer has been around for a while and has proved to be a real competitor with both bat and ball – qualities that will add great value to the team. Shannon Gabriel is working his way back to full match fitness after his ankle operation last year.

“The four weeks leading up to the first Test will be of tremendous benefit to him. A fully fit and firing Shannon adds great potency to the bowling attack, so it is important to have him back at his best.”

West Indies are scheduled to arrive in Manchester on June 9 and will be based in Manchester for a three-week period before moving to Southampton for the first Test at the Ageas Bowl. They will then return to Manchester for the second and third matches at Emirates Old Trafford.  All these matches will be played behind closed doors and are still subject to UK Government approval.

The West Indies are scheduled to play the first Test at Ageas Bowl in Southampton from July 8-12.

The action will then move to the Emirates Old Trafford in Manchester for the second Test from July 16-20 as well as the third Test from July 24-28.

WEST INDIES TEST SQUAD: Jason Holder (Captain), Jermaine Blackwood, Nkrumah Bonner, Kraigg Brathwaite, Shamarh Brooks, John Campbell, Roston Chase, Rahkeem Cornwall, Shane Dowrich, Chemar Holder, Shai Hope, Alzarri Joseph, Raymon Reifer, and Kemar Roach.

RESERVE PLAYERS: Sunil Ambris, Joshua Da Silva, Shannon Gabriel, Keon Harding, Kyle Mayers, Preston McSween, Marquino Mindley, Shane Moseley, Anderson Phillip, Oshane Thomas, and Jomel Warrican.

 

 

 

Ben Stokes would make an excellent England captain and could "solve the puzzle" of combining being all-rounder with leadership duties.

That is the view of former England star Andrew Flintoff, who himself had difficulty in balancing the same responsibilities with the national side.

Stokes, who is Test skipper Joe Root's second in command, has had a huge influence across all three formats and Flintoff has no doubt he could take on the top job.

"There'll be the argument where people say that all-rounders don't make good captains," Flintoff told talkSPORT.

"We've tried it before, 'look at that Flintoff, look at [Ian] Botham' – everyone will get labelled that they can't do it if you're an all-rounder.

"I'm sure that Ben will be thinking, 'I'd love a go at that, I'd love a chance to captain England'. But he's vice-captain, he's obviously got the respect of all the players, his current captain, his coaching staff.

"Why can't Ben Stokes be good? He's done everything else, he almost single-handedly won a World Cup final, he's won Test matches on his own. He's a leader in the dressing room, he's involved in all the tricky situations in games.

"At some point he'll get a go at being England captain and he just might be the one who solves the puzzle of being an all-rounder and doing the job well. 

"One thing I would say is, sometimes as an all-rounder and being that influential within a team you can put a bit too much pressure on yourself and that's the only thing he's got to be wary of."

Real Madrid have made a habit of European success down the years, winning the ultimate prize more times than any other club, and in 2017 they did what no one else could.

But June 3, 2016 will be remembered by many for contrasting reasons, as Muhammad Ali – one of the greatest athletes ever – died, leaving the sporting world in despair.

This day is also notable for South African cricket, and specifically an historic captaincy announcement.

We take a look at the major sporting events to have happened on this day through the years.

2017 – Los Blancos continue their European reign

When Real Madrid and Juventus went head-to-head in Cardiff for the 2017 Champions League final, the omens appeared to be in favour of the Old Lady – no team had ever defended their title in the competition.

But Madrid are no ordinary club and history was theirs in Wales, as they became the first club to retain the Champions League.

Although Mario Mandzukic cancelled out Cristiano Ronaldo's well-taken 20th-minute opener with an outrageous over-the-shoulder volley, Madrid romped to a 4-1 victory in the second half.

Casemiro's deflected long-range effort put them back in front, Ronaldo turned in from close range to increase the deficit and Marco Asensio finished Juve off after brilliant work from Marcelo – they would go on to win the competition for a third successive season the following year.

2016 – Sport loses an icon

Arguably the most iconic boxer of all time, Muhammad Ali, died exactly four years ago.

His achievements in the ring were plentiful, Ali's most famous victories came in the Thrilla in Manila (1975) against Joe Frazier, and the Rumble in the Jungle (1974), in which he stunningly defeated George Foreman. The latter attracted an estimated one billion TV viewers.

Ali was renowned for his charisma, showmanship and quick wit, while he also wrote poetry and enjoyed success as a musician.

However, his impact as an activist is what he is best remembered for by many. Ali was stripped of his heavyweight titles after refusing to be drafted to the Vietnam War in 1966 and spent over three years away from the ring as he fought his conviction for draft evasion, which was overturned in 1971. His stance saw him grow into an inspirational figure in the civil rights movement.

He succumbed to Parkinson's syndrome in 2016, 32 years after making his diagnosis public. He continues to be regarded as one of the most significant and celebrated athletes in history.

2014 – An historic appointment for South African cricket

With Graeme Smith recently retiring from international cricket, in June 2014 South Africa made an historic appointment for his replacement as Test captain.

Batsman Hashim Amla got the nod despite many suspecting AB de Villiers – Smith's deputy – to have been the leading candidate for the role.

Durban-born Amla, who is of Indian descent, became South Africa's first non-white permanent Test captain in the process.

Amla retired from all forms of international cricket in August last year following the Cricket World Cup.

1999 – Malone named NBA MVP again

After a stellar 1998-99 season, Karl Malone of the Utah Jazz claimed the Maurice Podoloff trophy as he was named NBA MVP.

It was the second time he claimed the prize, making him – at that point – only the ninth player in NBA history to win it more than once, having also been a standout star two years earlier.

In 1998-99, which had a shortened calendar due to a lockout, Malone averaged 23.8 points, 9.4 rebounds and 4.1 assists as the Jazz went 37-13, but the San Antonio Spurs ended the season victorious.

Ian Healy’s hard work and will to succeed, complemented by an undying loyalty to his teammates made him the pulse of the Australian team from October 14, 1988, when he began his ODI career, until May 25, 1997 when he played in his last one.

Healy was an aggressive runner between the wickets when he batted and despite not having all the big shots, was more than a handful for many a bowler who expected to be rid of the Australian innings soon after he came to the crease.

His quality as a wicketkeeper was always good, bearing in mind the penchant Australia had for finding real quicks for international duty. But that quality was never more on display as he kept wicket to the big-turning Shane Warne. In fact, his very nasal, “bowling Warnie,” became a signature sound, not just in Australian cricket, but the world around. Many young boys can be recalled mimicking ‘well bowled Warnie’ even though there was never another Warne at the other end. The partnerships between himself and Glen McGrath, Jason Gillespie, and Warne yielded many a wicket, the man named to Australia’s team of the 20th century claiming 233 scalps.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Ian Andrew Healy

Born: April 30, 1964, Spring Hill, Brisbane, Queensland

Major teams: Australia, Queensland

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Australia (1988-1997)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave     BF      SR      100s    50s   4s    6s      Ct          St

168      120     36      1764    56     21.00   2104   83.84      0        4    77     5       194         39

 

Career Highlights

  • 7th most dismissals in ODIs (233)
  • Completed 194 catches and 39 stumpings
  • Scored 1764 runs at an average of 21.00

Peter Jeffrey Dujon was as stylish with the bat as he was with the gloves. Many have called his efforts behind the stumps when the West Indies bowled a four-pronged pace attack of magnificent stature, one of the most spectacular sights of the 1980s.

Not usually required to score heavily for the West Indies from his place in the lower order, Duj never scored an ODI century but had six half-centuries, inclusive of 82 not out. Playing at a time when the scoring rate in ODIs was little better than Test cricket, Dujon’s strike rate of 67.51 was not slow, even if his average of 23.15 was a little low for a batsman of his quality. From behind the stumps he managed 204 dismissals, 21 of those stumpings.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Peter Jeffrey Leroy Dujon

Born: May 28, 1956, Kingston, Jamaica

Major teams: West Indies, Jamaica

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: West Indies (1981 – 1991)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs     HS     Ave      BF      SR      100s    50s   Ct      St

169     120      36     1945      82*    23.15   2881   67.51      0       6      183    21

 

Career Highlights

  • 11th most dismissals in ODIs (204)
  • Had 183 catches and 21 stumpings in 169 ODIs
  • Scored 1,945 runs in ODIs at an average of 23.15
  • scored six half-centuries in ODIs

“Shabash shabash!” were common sounds coming through stump mics around the world whenever Pakistan were playing. That was because Moin Khan was Pakistan’s wicketkeeper, urging his bowler along with a hearty ‘well done!’. Moin was the pulse of the Pakistan team throughout the 1990s and his influence made them a competitive unit. Batting with the lower order Moin never managed an ODI century but his 12 fifties, including 72 in his final year of international cricket, always seemed to come when Pakistan needed it most. As a wicketkeeper, Moin was sharp enough to snaffle up 287 victims in his 219 ODI games.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Mohammad Moin Khan

Born: September 23, 1971, Rawalpindi, Punjab

Major teams: Pakistan, Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm offbreak

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Pakistan (1990-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs    HS     Ave      BF        SR      100s    50s     4s      6s      Ct     St

219     183      41     3266     72*    23.00    4017    81.30       0       12     218    61     214    73

 

Career Highlights

  • 5th most dismissals in ODIs (287)
  • 214 catches and 73 stumpings in 219 ODIs
  • Scored 3,266 runs in ODIs at an average of 23.00
  • 12 ODI half-centuries

Reports have emerged that the West Indies selectors have chosen a squad to play against England in a three-Test series in July. However, the squad will not include Darren Bravo, Keemo Paul or Shimron Hetmeyer who have all opted out of the three-Test match tour.

The squad is expected to depart from the Caribbean on June 8.

According to cricket commentator and talk show host Andrew Mason, the selectors had a hard time selecting a squad but in the end, came up with a squad that includes the recalled Jermaine Blackwood and Shannon Gabriel.

The names of the others who were selected include Captain Jason Holder, Kraigg Brathwaite, Shai Hope, Shane Dowrich, Roston Chase, Shemarh Brooks, Rahkeem Cornwall, Nkrumah Bonner, Alzarri Joseph, Chemar Holder, John Campbell, Raymon Reifer and Kemar Roach.

The West Indies will be in the United Kingdom for about four weeks and will be housed in a bio-secure environment while they get up to speed before the start of the first Test.

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) confirmed on Tuesday that a three-Test series without spectators is scheduled to start on July 8 at the Ageas Bowl.

Old Trafford will host the second and third Tests.

The venues have been selected from a group of four that submitted an interest, having had to demonstrate to the ECB board an ability to meet criteria surrounding biosecurity, medical screening-testing provision, footprint to enable social distancing and venue-cricket operations.

Edgbaston was picked as a contingency venue and will be utilised for additional training throughout July.

The Windies are due to arrive in England on June 9 and will use Old Trafford as their base for training and quarantining before travelling to the Ageas Bowl.

 

 

 

Romesh Kaluwitharana debuted in Sri Lanka’s One-Day International team in 1990 against India but did not bad as his side, chasing down 136, romped to victory on the back of Aravinda de Silva’s unbeaten 63. Then, Kalu was considered a wicketkeeper who could bat a bit, but with no partner for Roshan Mahanama at the top of the order, his chance would come. Kaluwitharana would forge an opening partnership with another person thought to be unlikely to suit the spot, Sanath Jayasuriya. The partnership was legendary, transforming the ODI game completely, as the batsmen blasted the opposition off the park in the first 15 overs of the game when generally, openers were looking to solidify themselves at the crease in the hopes of continuing on to a big score. The two were fearless and their exploits made for a romping 1996 World Cup victory. His opportunities diminished after 2000 and the arrival of Kumar Sangakkara, but he still managed to distinguish himself as a wicketkeeper in the ODI game with more than 200 dismissals.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Romesh Shantha Kaluwitharana

Born: November 24, 1969, Colombo

Major teams: Sri Lanka, Colts Cricket Club, Galle Cricket Club, Sebastianites Cricket and Athletic Club

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

ODI Career: Sri Lanka (1990-2004)

Mat    Inns    NO     Runs          HS     Ave    BF          SR      100    50          4s      6s      Ct          St

189    181    14     3711          102* 22.22 4776          77.70 2       23          411    17     132          75

 

Career Highlights

  • Helped introduce aggressive batting approach in first 15 overs
  • 132 catches and 72 stumpings in 189 ODIs
  • Scored 3,711 runs at an average of 22.22

Cricket West Indies (CWI) has joined the growing list of sporting associations to voice support for ongoing protests in the United States and the overarching call for an end to racial inequality and injustice.

Both peaceful and violent protests have rocked the United States for the last eight days as many across the nation continue to remonstrate about the circumstances that led to the death of George Floyd an unarmed African American man.

Derek Chauvin, a Minneapolis cop, was filmed with his knee on the neck of the restrained and pleading Floyd who later went unconscious and was reported dead at the hospital.  Several athletes, including West Indies cricket stars Darren Sammy and Chris Gayle, have joined those voices demanding justice and the organisation threw their support behind the pair and the movement.

   “We join our cricketers, other cricket stakeholders, and all sportsmen, sportswomen, and sports administrators in speaking out against all forms of racism and inequality.  We stand alongside all who are peacefully protesting and championing this cause,” the release read.

The West Indies, like the United States, has deep-rooted connections to slavery and colonialism.  A part of the success of early West Indies cricket teams, who became the sport’s dominant force, was built on the fierce desire to prove themselves equal to colonizing powers and those who thought of themselves as racially superior.

“The people of the West Indies have fought many battles of our own on and off the field.  We have been blessed to witness the prowess, determination, and leadership of our cricketing heroes who united the Caribbean and brought great success and pride to our people,” the release continued.

“Our cricketing heroes helped in large measure to pave the way for cricket and our West Indian societies to thrive at home, and generated enjoyment and dignity for the West Indian diaspora abroad while they faced their own experiences of inequality and injustice in their adopted home.”

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