Trelawny Stadium in Jamaica to host two regional four-day matches after 11-year break

By December 05, 2019

For the first time in 11 years, regional four-day cricket matches will be played at the Trelawny Stadium in Jamaica.

Cricket West Indies has scheduled the fifth-round match between the Jamaica Scorpions and the Leeward Islands Hurricanes from February 13 to 16 at the venue, as well as the sixth-round match between the Scorpions and Guyana Jaguars from February 27 to March 1.

The competition is set to bowl off on Thursday, January 9, 2020.

 CWI director of cricket, Jimmy Adams, said the decision to have the Trelawny Stadium host the matches as part of a process to get the ground in shape.

 “It will be good to see the Trelawny Stadium hosting regional cricket again after so many years with this effort from the Jamaica Cricket Association to build its capacity in western Jamaica,” said Adams.

 Previously, only one West Indies Championship match has ever been played at the ground back in 2009, when current West Indies team operations manager Rawl Lewis led the Windward Islands to a three-wicket victory over Jamaica.

 The stadium that was completed in 2007 before the start of the ICC Cricket World Cup can seat 25,000, has been the stage for five other first-class matches – two involving international teams touring the Caribbean, and three involving West Indies ‘A’ and counterparts from Sri Lanka and England.

 Meanwhile, Adams said he was excited about the forthcoming West Indies Championship season, and working with the new West Indies senior selection panel to identify the next wave of players hoping to break into the West Indies Test team.

 “A new season is always an occasion for optimism as we expect performances from both established and rookie players within the system,” said Adams. 

“I’m sure the new selection panel under Roger Harper will be keen to cast their eyes over this competition which will wrap up our 2019-20 cricket season.”

 Five-time defending champions, Guyana Jaguars open their defence against the Leeward Islands Hurricanes at the Vivian Richards Cricket Ground in a day/night contest played with a pink ball.

 This year’s championship marks a decade since CWI was the first member of the ICC to play a pink-ball match in its first-class competition, when Guyana and Trinidad & Tobago played from January 15 to 18, 2010.

 Pink-ball matches have now become a standard part of the championship and each team will play two of these games – home and away – under the tournament format.

 The other first-round matches include Trinidad & Tobago Red Force battling the Jamaica Scorpions at the Brian Lara Cricket Academy in Trinidad, and the Windward Islands Volcanoes tackling Barbados Pride at the Arnos Vale Cricket Ground in St. Vincent.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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