‘CPL-sized’ crowd gave Windies women the edge

By November 15, 2018

In the first stand-alone T20 World Cup for women, there were questions about what the crowd would be like. 

The Windies lined up against South Africa on Wednesday in St Lucia and after what transpired, they needn’t have been a worry.

The crowd in Bassetterre, St Kitts smacked of a Hero Caribbean Premier League than what was expected at a women’s game, which has been notoriously hard to promote.

The crowd, which came to support the home team and defending champions of the competition, got what they were looking for, as the Windies ran out 31-run winners after a low-scoring affair.

“It’s fantastic to see this crowd,” said Windies skipper Stafanie Taylor.

“I was surprised to see this crowd and looking back at CPL, it wasn’t so much, so we are quite happy that the crowd turned out for us,” said Taylor.

The impact of the crowd wasn’t only felt by Taylor, who grabbed career-best figures, 4-12, in the win, and her team, but also by South African skipper, Dane van Niekerk.

“We didn’t play just eleven of them on the field,” said van Niekerk.

“We played against the home crowd which was brilliant to see,” she said.

“They came out to support and that was great to see, made it tough to play against them,” she said.

The Windies, sent into bat, scored a paltry 107 and could have been dead in the water but for a brilliant bowling and fielding performance that restricted the South African batsmen to just 76.

Van Niekerk was not amused.

“What can you say when you put up a batting display like that,” said van Nieker,

“I can’t fault the bowlers at the moment. To restrict a very good West Indies batting line up to just 107, I couldn’t ask for more,” said van Niekerk.

Paul-Andre Walker

Paul-Andre is the Managing Editor at SportsMax.tv. He comes to the role with almost 20 years of experience as journalist. That experience includes all facets of media. He began as a sports Journalist in 2001, quickly moving into radio, where he was an editor before becoming a news editor and then an entertainment editor with one of the biggest media houses in the Caribbean.

Related items

  • Duckworth-Lewis-Stern co-developer Tony Lewis dies aged 78 Duckworth-Lewis-Stern co-developer Tony Lewis dies aged 78

    Tony Lewis, who co-developed the Duckworth-Lewis-Stern system utilised in cricket, has died, the ICC confirmed on Thursday.

    Lewis passed away at the age of 78. He developed the original Duckworth-Lewis method alongside fellow statistician Frank Duckworth.

    The ICC has used the formula – which calculates the target score for a team batting second in an interrupted limited-overs match – since 1999.

    After the retirements of Lewis and Duckworth, Steven Stern became the custodian of the method and his name was added in 2014.

    "Tony's contribution to cricket is huge. The present day system of resetting targets in international cricket is based on the one developed by him and Frank more than two decades ago," said ICC general manager Geoff Allardice.

    "His contribution to the game of cricket will be remembered for years to come and we send our condolences to his family and friends."

  • On this day in sport: Mets boss dies, Red Rum hat-trick, MLS strike over, India glory On this day in sport: Mets boss dies, Red Rum hat-trick, MLS strike over, India glory

    Today marks 25 years since Major League Baseball stars called off their strike, which had resulted in the previous year's World Series being scrapped.

    It is also 38 years to the day since the New York Mets were left stunned by the death of one of the biggest names in baseball.

    History was made on this day in England at Aintree in 1977, while India's cricketers and Manchester United's Wayne Rooney were both celebrating nine years ago.

    Let's take a look back at April 2 in sporting history.

    1972 - Baseball in shock as Mets manager Hodges dies

    Gil Hodges had been a superstar with the Brooklyn Dodgers and Los Angeles Dodgers, and rounded off his playing career with the just-founded New York Mets. An eight-time All-Star, as a coach he added to the two World Series with the Dodgers, Hodges famously reviving the Mets and leading them to a shock 1969 title triumph over the Baltimore Orioles. But Hodges died on April 2, 1972, at the age of just 47, when he suffered a heart attack following a round of golf in West Palm Beach, Florida. It was his second heart attack: a first came in Atlanta in September 1968, early in his career as manager of the Mets.

    1977 - Red Rum wins third Grand National

    Tommy Stack rode Red Rum to Aintree glory, as the Ireland-bred steeplechaser followed up 1973 and 1974 triumphs at the Liverpool course with an unprecedented third Grand National victory. The feat has never been matched, with Red Rum triumphing against the odds after second-placed finishes in 1975 and 1976. At the age of 12, Red Rum's third success went down as one of racing's most famous wins.

    1995 - Baseball stars go back to work

    From August 12 1994 until April 2 1995, there was no top-tier baseball in the United States, with MLB stars going on strike in a labour dispute that stemmed from salary-cap proposals that got players riled. The 1994-95 season was abandoned in September, and the strike lasted for 232 days until judge Sonia Sotomayor's injunction against team owners persuaded the players to go back to work.

    2011 - India triumph, Rooney treble

    India landed Cricket World Cup glory in front of their home fans in Mumbai when the hosts landed a six-wicket win over Sri Lanka in the final. Mahela Jayawardene made a century in Sri Lanka's 274-6 before India reached their target with 10 balls to spare, helped by 97 from Gautam Gambhir and 91 not out from MS Dhoni.

    In London, on the same day, Wayne Rooney scored a hat-trick as Manchester United came from 2-0 behind to defeat West Ham 4-2 at Upton Park in the Premier League, an important result as Alex Ferguson's team went on to win the title weeks later.

  • Windies tour of England not called off just yet Windies tour of England not called off just yet

    Isolation units and Coronavirus checkpoints at cricket grounds could see the West Indies still making the trip to that country for closed-door games.

    The West Indies were scheduled to start a three-Test duel with England at T/he Oval, Edgbaston, and Lord’s on June 4 until the rapid spread of COVID-19 across Europe threatened to derail those plans.

    The ECB and Cricket West Indies have been trying to come up with solutions to keep what is expected to be a lucrative series alive.

    According to reports, the ECB is stepping up plans to resume cricket in June, but with no spectators, but that broadcasting would still go ahead since that was safer and that is where the majority of money to be earned from the series would be in any case.

    The approach, ECB Director of Special Projects, Steve Elworthy, explained that any approach involving re-starting cricket in England would mean creating a sterile environment, safe for players and staff.

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.