Australia coach Justin Langer is confident Matthew Wade is "doing everything" to earn a recall to the Test fold for the Ashes.

Wade has not played for his country in any format for almost two years, yet he was called into their Cricket World Cup squad as a replacement for the injured Usman Khawaja.

And although the 31-year-old was unused in that tournament, he has scored three centuries in England in recent weeks - two for Australia A in List A fixtures and another for an XI in a first-class clash with England Lions.

Langer acknowledges Wade's hard work could yet be rewarded as he prepares to be involved in a clash between Australia and Australia A ahead of an announcement of the team for the first Ashes Test, which starts on August 1.

"There's a lot of talk about Wadey and his form, where he's batting and his wicketkeeping," Langer said. "He just keeps doing it. He's got three hundreds on this tour already - he's only batted six or seven times.

"He's doing everything we've asked of Australian cricketers. He's making runs, big runs, he's knocking that hard, he's got that look in his eye.

"Coming into a tough series like this, you like to see those fighting instincts. He's certainly banging very hard for selection."

Another man whose character was lauded by Langer on Monday was Tim Paine, who has retained the Test captaincy despite the return of previously suspended duo Steve Smith and David Warner.

"You talk about the toughest pretty boy I've met, he's very impressive," Langer said of Paine. "He's physically tough, helping to guide the boys through the past 12 months.

"To come back from almost not playing cricket to being Test captain says a lot about his character.

"I get on that well with him, we have a great relationship. I've always felt the relationship between the captain and coach is crucial - we're lucky to have a great relationship.

"He's very impressive and I know how focused and committed he is to this series, so I'm happy about that."

Justin Langer says up to four places in the Australia Test side are up for grabs but the encounter between teams run by Graeme Hick and Brad Haddin will not be a "shoot-out" for Ashes selection.

Test captain Tim Paine will lead a Hick XII against a Haddin-coached line-up skippered by Travis Head in a four-day contest at the Rose Bowl, which starts on Tuesday.

Australia commence their battle with England at Edgbaston on August 1 and head coach Langer is still some way from finalising selection for the series opener.

"I think there are a couple of bowling positions up for grabs, probably a couple of batting positions," Langer said.

"There will be a lot of discussion about whether we have an extra spinner, a lot of discussion about whether we have an extra wicketkeeper.

"It won't necessarily be a straight shoot-out [in Southampton], but there will certainly be good opportunities for guys."

Langer is hopeful Usman Khawaja will recover from a hamstring injury to be fit to face Joe Root's side in Birmingham, but the tourists will take no risks with the batsman.

"It was a bit of a race against time for this game," Langer said of Khawaja's availability for the warm-up fixture.

"He was really close … but with his style of hamstring you just want to make sure it’s right because you don't want him to be pushing it too soon and have it affecting him the rest of the series.

"We’ll wait and see what happens with this game, and then we'll have to wait and see what happens with the first Test match. Fingers crossed he'll be okay."

Australia guaranteed they will retain the women's Ashes by drawing the four-day Test match against England at Taunton.

Meg Lanning's team were in control of the contest from start to finish, and had it not been for rain affecting the second day, the tourists may have been in a position to push for victory.

The Australians won all three ODIs earlier in July to seize control of the multi-format series, taking two points for each success to earn a 6-0 lead. Three T20s are still to come, with two points again up for grabs each time.

However, Australia's four-year reign as Ashes holders meant England needed to triumph at Taunton in the only Test match, with four points up for grabs, to stand any chance of making up for the ODI setbacks and taking back the trophy.

Australia instead dominated and piled up 420-8 in their first innings before limiting England to 275-9. The home side had to bowl out Australia cheaply on the final day to give themselves any hope, but that was never a realistic prospect.

Australia reached 230-7 for a lead of 375, with first-innings centurion Ellyse Perry making 76 not out, before an early-evening handshake brought the match to its end.

England can level the series should they win each T20 contest, but Australia have achieved the priority goal of their trip by ensuring they will keep the trophy.

Lanning said: "It's certainly a good position to be in. We came over here with that as the main focus for our group.

"We had a hard four days' battle against England. Unfortunately we couldn't get a [winning] result here but I thought it was a great Test."

She added: "I think there's been a lot of high-pressure moments within this series and we've been able to come out the other side on top of those. It's been a lot closer than the scoreboard suggests and we know the T20s are going to be a close-run thing."

England captain Heather Knight said at the post-match presentation: "We're obviously disappointed. They outplayed us obviously so congratulations to them. Now we've got to treat the T20 series as a series in itself. We've got three games to show what we can do.

"We haven't given the best account of ourselves. We haven't played up to the standards we know we can play to."

James Anderson is unsure if he will feature in England's Test against Ireland but says he feels "good" ahead of the Ashes.

England's record Test wicket-taker sustained a calf muscle tear in Lancashire's County Championship clash with Durham at the start of this month.

The seamer, who turns 37 in August, may not be risked for a four-day encounter with Ireland at Lord's, but allayed concerns over whether he will be fit to face Australia when the five-match series starts at Edgbaston on August 1.

"We meet up on Monday and at the moment I feel good," Anderson told the BBC.

"I will keep bowling and we will monitor it. If it comes to Wednesday and I'm fit to play [against Ireland] then great, but if not I will work towards being fit for the Ashes."

Anderson says Joe Root's side must build on the feel-good factor created by the ODI team following England's Cricket World Cup triumph last weekend.

"It's a really exciting time for English cricket. I think it was an amazing final and the reaction to it has been phenomenal," he added.

"It's time to re-focus on to Test cricket. We realise the dangers that the Australian team bring to Test cricket, so we're going to have to be fully focused on that.

"We can't afford to hang on to the World Cup win. It's our job as English cricketers to try and carry that momentum on and hopefully an Ashes win will do that."

Former director of cricket Andrew Strauss wants England to succeed where they failed in the wake of 2005 Ashes glory and build a dynasty off the back of their Cricket World Cup triumph.

Strauss was part of the side that defeated Australia 2-1 in a thrilling home series 14 years ago and was then a key figure behind the scenes as England ripped up their white-ball strategy following a humiliating group-stage exit at the World Cup in 2015.

Having been forced to step down from his director role last year to support his wife Ruth, who was being treated for terminal cancer, Strauss witnessed the culmination of his planning as Eoin Morgan's men edged New Zealand in an epic final at Lord's on Sunday.

But Strauss issued a warning to the side ahead of the Ashes starting next month on the back of his own experiences as a player, when the Test side failed to win any of the three series following that famous 2005 win, before being whitewashed 5-0 in Australia when the battle for the urn was renewed in 2006-07.

"I think there are a lot of similarities there," Strauss told Omnisport at the world premiere of 'The Edge'. "I think the lesson from 2005 is that was a high watermark and then we retreated back again.

"We need to make this a sort of stepping stone to even bigger and better things. You can't beat winning a World Cup but you can create a dynasty for yourself in terms of performance.

"But not just performance, how you are. We want our players to be people that people want to aspire to be. I think we've got a great group of players that are able to do that."

Two of England's World Cup heroes, Jason Roy and Jofra Archer, are set to make the transition to the Test format – although the latter will only do so once he has recovered from a side strain.

And Strauss sees no reason why the pair, full of confidence after Sunday's dramatic victory, cannot transfer their skills to the longer form.

"I'm not sure either of them are actually white-ball specialists," Strauss added. "I think they've played white-ball cricket up until now, I think both of them are really well-seasoned to play Test cricket.

"It's not going to be easy, Test cricket is a different game and it challenges you in different ways as well, but I think they'll be incredibly confident.

"They've done it on the biggest stage of all which is a great hurdle to overcome, and we've got a great opportunity to beat the Aussies again, so let's take it."

Jason Roy's "bravado" will help transfer his form from 50-over cricket to the Test format, according to England fielding coach Paul Collingwood.

Roy was one of the heroes of England's triumphant Cricket World Cup campaign, contributing to the key run out of Martin Guptill from the final ball of the Super Over as the hosts defeated New Zealand courtesy of a superior boundary count at the end of an epic final at Lord's on Sunday.

And the opener's batting was a major factor throughout the tournament, scoring his 443 runs from just seven innings at a strike rate of more than 115, setting the tone for England with a typically belligerent approach alongside Jonny Bairstow.

Roy's form has earned a maiden Test call-up as England prepare to face Ireland over four days next week before the start of the Ashes against Australia on August 1, and Collingwood has no doubts the Surrey batsman's coursing confidence will aid his adaptation to the longer form.

"White-ball cricket and red-ball cricket are completely different ends of the spectrum," Collingwood told Omnisport, speaking at the world premiere of 'The Edge'.

"But if he can bring that kind of that form, and that confidence and bravado that he brings to that white-ball game, I'm sure he'll be able to go out there and succeed.

"He can quickly take a game away from the opposition if he gets on a roll, so it's exciting times to see people like that come into the side."

Ian Bell, a former Ashes winner alongside Collingwood, echoed his old team-mate's sentiments.

"I was really impressed actually at times with Jason Roy because even though he hasn't batted at the top of the order for Surrey, I thought there were times at the World Cup when the ball did move around and technically he played as well as anyone," Bell told Omnisport.

"He has an opportunity… when you face Australia in the Ashes it's high pressure and they've got one of the best bowling attacks in world cricket right now. It will be a challenge but there's no doubt he's got the ability to do something very special."

Indian Premier League team Sunrisers Hyderabad have appointed a new head coach in Trevor Bayliss, who will leave his role with England after the Ashes.

The Sunrisers have parted ways with former incumbent Tom Moody and will replace him with Bayliss, who led England to Cricket World Cup glory, culminating in Sunday's dramatic final against New Zealand at Lord's.

Bayliss joined England in 2015 but it has long been known that he will step down when his contract expires in September, following the five-Test series against the country of his birth, Australia.

Jason Roy is set to make his Test debut for England against Ireland, putting him in line for an Ashes call-up next month.

Star batsman Roy is yet to feature in the longest format at international level but was vital to hosts England's Cricket World Cup triumph.

His form in that tournament has earned him a first shot at Test cricket, selected among 13 players to face Ireland in a four-day contest at Lord's with Olly Stone and Lewis Gregory the other uncapped men to earn a spot.

The trio are also included in a 16-man group for a pre-Ashes camp.

There is good news for England, too, with James Anderson's inclusion in the squad, the experienced bowler having recovered from a calf tear.

However, Jofra Archer, another waiting for a Test bow, and Mark Wood are both suffering with side strains.

Wood is set for four to six weeks out while Archer will have a period of rest and return from Barbados later this month, with national selector Ed Smith stating the latter will be out "for a while".

Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler - stars of the World Cup success - have also been granted leave until the pre-Ashes camp ahead of the August 1 opener.

The four-day clash with Ireland begins on July 24.

 

England squad in full for Ireland Test: Joe Root, Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes.

England squad in full for pre-Ashes camp: Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach, Joe Root, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

Cricket World Cup final match-winner Jos Buttler hopes England's triumph will provide a major boost before the Test team's Ashes series.

Buttler was central to the hosts' World Cup success, putting on a fifth-wicket stand of 110 with Ben Stokes as they chased New Zealand's total, before starring again alongside the same man in the Super Over.

The wicketkeeper then ran out Martin Guptill following Jason Roy's throw to dramatically seal victory at Lord's, sparking incredible celebrations.

And as the festivities continued on Monday, Buttler conceded there had been little time to consider the Ashes against Australia - starting on August 1 - but hoped to build on the World Cup win.

"It's fantastic. It sounds ridiculous, but I don't think many people have been thinking about the Ashes yet," he told Sky Sports.

"I think we'll enjoy some time to let this sink in. But as summers go, this is a great start we can take into the Ashes and enjoy the momentum."

Moeen Ali also believes the trophy can act as a motivating factor, hoping Test skipper Joe Root will have been given a lift.

"I've loved every second of it, so I'm going to take it all in," Moeen added.

"We know the Ashes is around the corner and, in the back of your mind, it's always been there. But the World Cup has never been done before and this was the one thing we all wanted.

"Hopefully we can get even more support than we've ever had in the Ashes at home, which will spur us on.

"That momentum, that drive, I'm sure Rooty will take a lot from this as well. It's going to be an amazing series."

Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft have all been named in a 25-man group for the match between Australia and Australia A in Southampton.

Having been beaten by England in the Cricket World Cup semi-finals, Australia will now turn their attention to Test action, with the Ashes beginning on August 1.

The tourists will first face their 'A' team, and a squad for both sides to select from for a 12-v-12 four-day match has been confirmed.

Smith and Warner were both involved in the World Cup for the ODI side, but neither they nor Bancroft have featured for Australia's Test team since they were banned following the ball-tampering scandal last year.

Former skipper Smith and vice-captain Warner served year-long bans, while Bancroft, who has subsequently been playing county cricket with Durham, was suspended for nine months following the incident during Australia's tour of South Africa.

Marcus Stoinis and Glenn Maxwell are not included in this squad, but Alex Carey is involved and could get a first Test nod against England after an impressive World Cup.

Selector Trevor Hohns said of the group named for the warm-up match: "We have picked a group of players for a serious contest in Southampton which will assist us in finalising our squad for the Ashes series.

"Even though we know what the core of our Ashes squad will look like, the match in Southampton will be a final opportunity for some players to push their cases for inclusion in the touring party as there are still a small number of spots up for grabs.

"On that basis, we are expecting a full-on contest between players who will be hungry to succeed.
 
“In one way it is a shame that some players will have to miss out as every player in Southampton will have a strong case for inclusion in the Ashes squad.

"But the positive is that this group shows we now have a degree of depth, which stands us in good stead both now and in the middle term."

Jofra Archer is putting all Ashes talk on hold until after England's Cricket World Cup final showdown with New Zealand on Sunday.

The fiery fast bowler was born in Barbados and only became eligible to play for England this year, yet already he looks like a player who could make a lasting impact across all formats.

With James Anderson and Stuart Broad in the twilight of their international careers, the prospect of another prolific wicket-taking paceman coming into the Test side holds obvious appeal.

England's selectors will consider options for the Ashes in the coming weeks, with the opener against Australia beginning on August 1 at Edgbaston.

Asked about his Ashes chances, Archer said: "After Sunday I can probably answer that, but now I'm just focusing on trying to win the final."

He has 19 wickets at the World Cup already, emerging as the team's number one strike bowler, but is taking the achievements and the focus on him in his stride.

"I'm just glad the team's doing well," Archer said. "I could be doing terribly but as long as the team's winning I'm all right."

England have found prime form at the right time, getting out of group-stage trouble with victories over India and New Zealand before throttling Australia by eight wickets in Thursday's semi-final at Edgbaston.

Archer has vowed to keep unleashing bouncers at batsmen after one sparky delivery banged Australia's Alex Carey on the helmet, causing a chin injury that required six stitches.

The 24-year-old Sussex quick said: "You don't always mean to hit them. You just try to bowl a bouncer because it can be a wicket-taking ball or a dot ball.

"When it hits them you feel a little bit bad for doing it, but it's cricket and I don't think he'll be the last person to get hit."

Archer and England departed Birmingham in high spirits, and with a Lord's appointment booked the tournament hosts will target one last major push.

A niggling side issue should not prevent Archer playing a full part in the showpiece match, although when asked about the problem he admitted it was still causing some discomfort.

"A little bit but I'll keep soldiering on," Archer said. "I've been like this for a few games now. It's not getting any worse so that's a good sign."

Archer took eight wickets for Sussex against Middlesex in a County Championship match at Lord's last year, and facing the same opponents at the same ground he bagged a T20 hat-trick that included the scalp of England skipper Eoin Morgan.

But Archer said memories of the stadium left him with "mixed feelings".

"Sometimes I do OK, sometimes I don't do as well as I would like," Archer said. "Hopefully on Sunday it goes England's way, not just my way but England's way."

Pat Cummins cannot wait to return to Edgbaston and believes Australia will want revenge in the Ashes opener after their Cricket World Cup exit at England's hands.

Australia had to stomach a semi-final defeat to their oldest rivals on Thursday, when rampant England clinched an eight-wicket success with 17.5 overs in hand.

But the teams will return to the Birmingham ground for the first Test of their five-match Ashes series, with the August 1 start giving Australia an immediate focus as they cope with ODI frustration.

After England were roared on to victory by raucous supporters, Cummins said: "We're back here at Birmingham in two or three weeks. I know what to expect, know what to expect from the crowd."

England were beaten 2-1 by West Indies in their last Test series, in the Caribbean at the start of the year, and Cummins suggested Joe Root's five-day side are not the same proven force as Eoin Morgan's limited-overs team.

"They've got a couple of players but it's a pretty new team, their red-ball side," Cummins said, before returning to his theme of wanting to do better next time at Edgbaston.

"I don't need too much extra fuel, but it gives us a little more."

Cummins said Australia's disappointment would be tempered by their improvement as an ODI side in the past year.

"It's annoying and I'm peeved off at the moment," he said, before stressing he was "pretty proud of where we've come from".

"Last 12 months, if you told us we were going to be in a semi-final and come second in the group stage we'd have been really happy. In the knockout stages it happens, you get beaten by the better team on the day.

"I think we were always chasing that perfect game, but it just didn't come. We probably needed it out there [on Thursday].

"We managed to win games without playing the perfect game the whole way through."

Asked which team will win the World Cup, with New Zealand awaiting Morgan's men in Sunday's final at Lord's, Cummins said: "Probably England."

Ellyse Perry took seven wickets as England were skittled for their lowest ODI total against Australia in a 194-run Ashes defeat in Canterbury.

All-rounder Perry decimated England in their attempt to chase down Australia's 269-7, claiming career-best figures of 7-22, good enough for fourth place on the all-time list in women's ODIs.

The 28-year-old claimed 5-12 with two maidens from her first six overs in a destructive opening spell, with the hosts bowled out for just 75 after 32.5 overs.

It completed a one-day series whitewash for Australia, meaning they hold a 6-0 lead ahead of the solitary Test, at Taunton on July 18.

Perry said: "It was my day today, which was nice, but it's pleasing to win all three ODIs and finish this section of the series as we did. To be as comprehensive as we were was great.

"I've played here before and the slope works really well for us, so it was nice to attack the stumps and let it swing down the hill a bit."

Captain Meg Lanning, who scored 69, added: "I thought all-round we were even better than the last game. With the bat we were in a position to get a few more but England came back at us. But the bowling performance was excellent, Ellyse Perry leading the way."

James Anderson faces a nervous wait to find out if he can play in the Ashes opener after the England and Cricket Wales Board (ECB) confirmed the paceman has sustained a low-grade calf muscle tear.

England's record wicket taker underwent an MRI scan on Friday, which confirmed the damage and he is now set to undergo a rehabilitation programme.

Anderson pulled up hurt playing for Lancashire against Durham on Tuesday and will miss the next two County Championship matches against Northants and Sussex.

The ECB added in a statement that Anderson will be reassessed on an ongoing basis.

It means Anderson's status for the Ashes opener against Australia, which begins on August 1 at Edgbaston, remains unclear and he has just three weeks to prove his fitness.

"England seam bowler James Anderson, who left the field during Lancashire's Specsavers County Championship match against Durham at Sedbergh School on Tuesday, July 2 due to tightness to his right calf, underwent an MRI scan on Friday," the ECB said. 

"The MRI confirmed that Anderson has suffered a low grade calf muscle tear. As a result of the injury, he will commence a rehabilitation programme with the England and Lancashire CCC medical teams."

Speaking on BBC 5 live's Tailenders programme on Saturday, Anderson said he was hopeful of a swift recovery.

"It's frustrating because I've played a lot for Lancs this season and got through pretty much unscathed apart from getting smashed in the knee with a cricket ball," he said.

"But apart from that it's been pretty good. It's just part and parcel of the job, I'm just keeping my fingers crossed it's not too serious and that I'll be back as soon as possible."

James Anderson has shed fresh light on a calf injury he sustained while playing for Lancashire, confirming he is to undergo a scan in the coming week.

Anderson pulled up in Lancashire's County Championship match against Durham in midweek, leaving the field on day three.

He returned to bat on day four, but used a runner, and confirmed after the draw he had picked up a "niggle" he hoped would not be too serious.

With the Ashes less than a month away, Anderson's fitness will be of concern to England. The pace bowler has revealed the injury requires further assessment, though he is hopeful he will be fit to feature against Australia.

"I limped off the field, my calf didn't feel right, so I thought it was best to get off," Anderson told BBC Radio 5 Live's Tailenders programme on Saturday.

"It feels a bit stiff, a bit tight. It's my right calf. I'm having a scan this week. I've pulled my calf before and it doesn't feel as bad as it has done before."

Anderson added: "It's frustrating because I've played a lot for Lancs this season and got through pretty much unscathed apart from getting smashed in the knee with a cricket ball.

"But apart from that it's been pretty good. It's just part and parcel of the job, I'm just keeping my fingers crossed it's not too serious and that I'll be back as soon as possible."

Anderson has not been involved in England's World Cup campaign, with the tournament hosts having made it through to the semi-finals.

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