All Blacks star Beauden Barrett has signed with Japanese side Suntory Sungoliath and will miss next year's Super Rugby season.

Barrett, 29, signed a four-year deal with New Zealand Rugby (NZR) and the Blues in 2019, but will head to Japan in 2021 before returning for the international season.

The star playmaker will play under Kiwi coach Milton Haig, while England head coach Eddie Jones is a consultant for Suntory Sungoliath.

"For me it made sense to go next year and then have two years back with the Blues and hopefully the All Blacks in the lead up to the Rugby World Cup," Barrett said.

"My wife and I are excited to head to Japan next year. It is an appealing place for a young family and comparatively safe in health terms.

"The Investec Super Rugby Aotearoa competition has been an amazing experience. It's been brutal and demanding which is what you expect when New Zealand teams play each other.

"I'm loving every minute of it and having such big crowds turning out has been fantastic. I am loving the move to the Blues and we still have a job to do this season. It is an excellent environment with great coaching and an awesome bunch of dedicated players.

"While the excitement about heading to Japan will build closer to the time, I'll also be looking forward to being back later in 2021 and then into the 2022 Blues season."

All Blacks Brodie Retallick and Sam Whitelock have had similar agreements to play in Japan this year.

Blues head coach Leon MacDonald said he was planning for next year without Barrett.

"Our focus is fully on the current campaign but we have plans for next year without Beaudy," he said.

"He will be a big loss but that is countered with what he is doing on and off the field this year, and that we get him for two more years.

"We have Otere Black playing terrific rugby, and Harry Plummer who has been coming off the bench, while we will have Stephen Perofeta back next season from injury."

Jurgen Klopp hopes Liverpool can be inspired by the All Blacks and not settle for just one Premier League title.

Liverpool have won their first league trophy since 1990 after a dominant Premier League campaign, adding to last season's Champions League success.

Ahead of visiting Manchester City on Thursday, Klopp said he wanted Liverpool to continue pushing – inspired by New Zealand's national rugby union side the All Blacks.

"We feel in the middle of something, not the end of something," Klopp told reporters.

"We have to give everything until we finish our careers. As long as you wear this shirt, less than 100 per cent is not allowed. That is not my phrase, it came from the All Blacks. I saw that in a nice documentary about the All Blacks and I kept that always for myself. That is for each LFC player the same and for me the same.

"We prepare for Man City with full focus. We will be prepared for the next season as well. I don't know another way. I've learned when you think you've reached the pinnacle you are already on the way down and we don't feel that.

"I don't feel finally satisfied. It's a big step but not the only thing I want to talk about with the boys in 20 years."

With seven games remaining, Liverpool are 23 points clear of City ahead of their meeting at the Etihad Stadium.

But Klopp played down any talk either side could make a statement by winning the encounter, saying next season shaped as being different.

"A statement is a statement, I don't think we have to make them, what would change for next year if we beat City and what would happen to us if they won?" he said.

"People will say a few things. If we win they will say it's the best team in the league and if they win they will say, whatever City is better but we won the league, whatever people will say it's really not so important for next season for sure not.

"We both have to be ready for next year, not that I would be too worried about City, but we all have to be ready. You can really see at the moment that United is coming up, they're very much the same team a few weeks ago, besides one or two players, and people thought they had no chance, and now we see how good they are and how good they could be and they will not be worse next year, for sure, and again Chelsea as well."

FIFA has announced Australia and New Zealand will be joint hosts of the 2023 Women's World Cup.

A combined bid from Football Federation Australia (FFA) and New Zealand Football (NZF) saw off competition from Colombia to be awarded the tournament at a FIFA Council vote.

Following the success of the 2019 World Cup in France, the next edition will increase in size as 32 nations are to be involved.

The Colombia Football Association had hoped to become the first South American country to stage a Women's World Cup. However, they received only 13 of 35 votes.

Instead it will be Australia and New Zealand who make history, as they will host the first World Cup held across two continental confederations (Asia and Oceania).

FIFA president Gianni Infantino revealed the final verdict live on social media after congratulating both bids for their "remarkable work" during the process.

"FFA and NZF would like to thank the FIFA Council for their landmark decision, which will see the two countries host a tournament of firsts ─ the first ever co-confederation hosted FIFA World Cup, the first ever FIFA Women's World Cup to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first ever to be held in the southern hemisphere," the FFA and NZF said in a statement after the announcement.

"A player-centric tournament, Australia-New Zealand promises to deliver record-breaking crowds and long-term participation growth, bringing football together 'As One' to celebrate the women's game.

"FFA and NZF would also like to thank the Australian and New Zealand governments, Matildas' and Football Ferns' fans and the entire football family who have supported the bid from the outset, as well as the bidding team who worked tirelessly to develop a bid that will unlock the untapped football potential of the Asia-Pacific region."

Brazil and Japan had also at one stage been in the running before dropping out.

The Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) said the current economic situation, fuelled by the coronavirus pandemic, was one of the reasons for its withdrawal.

The All Blacks are in talks with rugby league world champions Australia over a cross-code match later this year, New Zealand Rugby (NZR) has confirmed.

December 5 has been mooted as the potential date for a 14-a-side meeting between rugby union powerhouse New Zealand and the Kangaroos.

Both codes are keen to generate as much revenue as possible, having been shut down for three months during the coronavirus pandemic.

"We've had an approach. We'll work that through and go through the proper process... if we feel it has merit to take further," NZR chief executive Mark Robinson said.

"It's one of the many different options ... we are considering.

"It's not new. The last time NZR had an approach was in 2017."

However, Robinson did state the "priority" for the All Blacks remains competing in international rugby union.

Australia coach Mal Meninga is keen for the game to be agreed to help the Kangaroos achieve "global recognition".

"I'm keen to make this happen. We want to play the All Blacks, hopefully, we can get the concept off the ground," he told the Courier Mail.

"This would take the Kangaroos to the world. There will be global recognition.

"We are still in talks but obviously news of this has got out.

"The best from our game versus the best from the New Zealand game … let's do it."

Crusaders captain Scott Barrett will miss the rest of the Super Rugby Aotearoa season as he requires surgery on a big toe injury.

The New Zealand lock was hurt playing in an internal game on June 13 and, following medical consultation, the decision was taken for Barrett to go under the knife.

Alex Ainley comes into the squad to cover for Barrett, while Codie Taylor takes over the armband.

A Crusaders statement read: "Crusaders Captain Scott Barrett sustained a significant injury to the structures supporting his big toe, while playing in the Crusaders internal game on Saturday 13 June.  

"After consultation with a foot specialist, it has been determined that Scott will miss the remainder of the Investec Super Rugby Aotearoa competition to undergo surgery and allow sufficient time to recover. Exact return to play dates are uncertain at this stage. 

"Alex Ainley has joined the Crusaders squad as injury cover for the competition, and Codie Taylor will take over captaincy of the side for the remainder of the season."

Barrett signed a new deal to stay with New Zealand Rugby and the Crusaders until 2023 last month.

June 20 is a day LeBron James will remember fondly, World Cup finals were settled and arguably the most famous penalty technique was first introduced. 

James was once again the king of Miami after leading the Heat to NBA glory in a thrilling series against the San Antonio Spurs. 

New Zealand made history at the first Rugby World Cup, while this day also saw Australia completely dominant in cricket's showpiece event.

Look back at some fond moments from years gone by on this day. 


1976 - The Panenka is born as Czechoslovakia celebrate

Defending European champions and reigning World Cup holders West Germany were overwhelming favourites for the final of Euro 1976. 

While Jan Svehlik and Karol Dobias put Czechoslovakia into a two-goal lead after 25 minutes, Dieter Muller and Bernd Holzenbein both scored to force extra-time in a 2-2 draw. 

When the additional minutes could not split the teams, a penalty shoot-out was required. Uli Hoeness' miss presented Antonin Panenka with a golden opportunity to seal glory.

His long run-up and delicate chip deceived goalkeeper Sepp Maier, leading to the birth of the famous Panenka penalty and earning a 5-3 victory shoot-out victory.


1987 - New Zealand win first final 

A near 50,000-strong crowd roared New Zealand on to victory on home soil at Eden Park in the first ever Rugby World Cup final. 

The fearsome All Blacks were too good for Scotland and Wales in the previous knockout rounds, but France had stunned Australia to provide hope of an upset. 

Instead, it was one-way traffic. Michael Jones, captain David Kirk and John Kirwan scored tries in a convincing 29-9 win over Les Bleus.  

Surprisingly, New Zealand would not be crowned champions again until 2011. 


1999 – Australia Lord it over Pakistan

The 1999 Cricket World Cup final was about as one-sided as it gets as Australia thrashed Pakistan by eight wickets. 

An enigmatic Pakistan side were skittled for a meagre 132 in 39 overs after surprisingly opting to bat first at Lord's, leg-spinner Shane Warne returning figures of 4-33. 

Australia – led by Steve Waugh - rattled off the chase with a whopping 29.5 overs to spare, Adam Gilchrist celebrating a half-century in the process. 

It marked the first of three consecutive World Cup triumphs for the Australians, as they reigned again under the captaincy of Ricky Ponting in both 2003 and 2007. 


2013 – LeBron's Heat reign again after Spurs epic

For the second straight year, LeBron James was named NBA Finals MVP as the Miami Heat retained their title by defeating the Spurs. 

It was the third straight year a star-studded Heat roster including Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh had made it through to the Finals. 

A see-saw series had seen the Spurs lead on three occasions but a dramatic 103-100 overtime win in Game 6, considered by many to be one of the great playoff contests in NBA history, set up a decider. 

James duly put up a game-high 37 points and provided 12 rebounds and four assists in a 95-88 triumph. 

The Spurs would gain revenge a year later, which proved to be James' last season in Miami as he returned to the Cleveland Cavaliers, the team who had drafted him first overall in 2003. 

Tiger Woods did not only win the 2000 U.S. Open on June 18, he did so having obliterated the rest of the field.

Two decades ago, no one could get near to Woods and his record-breaking performance at Pebble Beach.

Mike Catt got much closer to Jonah Lomu five years earlier, not that he was able to stop him, while Eoin Morgan was delivering his own dominant performance on June 18, 2019.

Here we take a look at three major sporting events to have occurred on June 18 in previous years.

 

1995 - Lomu steamrollers England

Lomu delivered perhaps the finest individual performance at a Rugby World Cup match when starring for New Zealand against England in the 1995 semi-final.

The wing scored four tries as the All Blacks won 45-29 against an England side that simply could not contain the All Blacks' number 11.

His first score was the best, as Lomu collected a ball that bounced behind him, held off two England players and then dismissively ploughed over Catt when off-balance before dotting down.

In another incredible demonstration of speed, Lomu crossed for the fourth time when side-stepping Catt to leave the England back grasping at air.

 

2000 - Woods goes wire-to-wire at Pebble Beach

Stating Woods was the wire-to-wire winner at the 2000 U.S. Open only begins to explain his dominance given his eventual major record 15-stroke advantage.

Woods arrived at the 100th U.S. Open as a two-time major champion and a third looked assured even before the weekend as he had a six-shot lead after 36 holes.

Only playing against himself by the Sunday, Woods parred the opening nine holes before reeling off four birdies in five holes en route to a final-round 67. It was the first of four majors in a row that Woods would win - which became known as the 'Tiger Slam'.

 

2019 - Aerial Eoin dismantles Afghanistan attack

Prior to hosting the World Cup on home soil in 2019, England players had mused on the possibility of becoming the first team in ODI history to score 500 runs.

It did not quite happen, but the reason for such optimism was evident when they took Afghanistan's attack apart in making 397-6 in a group-stage game at Old Trafford.

Several records did fall as captain Morgan made the most sixes in an ODI (17), England accrued the most maximums in an ODI (25) while poor Rashid Khan went for 0-110 off his nine overs.

Morgan, who would end up lifting the trophy later that tournament, finished with a frankly ridiculous 148 from 71 balls before England claimed a 150-run success.

Blues captain Patrick Tuipulotu has signed a new deal with New Zealand Rugby until the 2023 Rugby World Cup.

It was announced on Monday that the New Zealand lock has agreed terms on the back of the Blues' 30-20 victory over the Hurricanes at a packed Eden Park on the opening weekend of Super Rugby Aotearoa.

The 27-year-old has won 30 caps for the All Blacks and played 74 times for Auckland franchise the Blues since making his debut in 2014.

"I am pleased to continue to play for New Zealand Rugby and the Blues until 2023 and I'm excited about the future," said Tuipulotu.

"During the [coronavirus] lockdown I realised more than ever how much I love this game and love playing for the Blues. We are beginning to develop into a really good side and it is an honour to lead them.

"I am still young and learning all the time, and I want to establish myself as an international player."

All Blacks head coach Ian Foster said: "This is fantastic news for New Zealand Rugby and the Blues.

"Patrick has grown considerably over the last few years, both on the field as a player and off field with his captaincy and leadership.

"The fact that he has re-signed through to the 2023 Rugby World Cup is a sign of not only NZ Rugby's commitment to him, but also Patty's desire to achieve his own goals in New Zealand over the next few years.

"We congratulate him on making that commitment."

The ICC has delayed a decision over the respective fates of the men's T20 World Cup and women's Cricket World Cup in order to continue exploring contingency plans over the next month.

Australia is due to host the men's T20 competition between October 18 and November 15 but the status of the tournament remains unclear due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, while the women's 50-over event is slated to take place in New Zealand from February 6 to March 7 next year.

Last month, the ICC denied reports a decision had been taken to move the T20 World Cup back to next year, although Cricket Australia said it was braced for the postponement.

Following an ICC Board meeting on Wednesday, the governing body said it will "continue to assess and evaluate the rapidly changing public health situation caused by COVID-19 working with key stakeholders including governments to explore how the events can be staged to protect the health and safety of everyone involved."

ICC chief executive Manu Sawhney said: "The situation surrounding the global pandemic is evolving rapidly and we want to give ourselves the best possible opportunity to make the right decision for the whole sport. 

"The health and well-being of everyone involved is our priority and other considerations fall out from that.

"We will only get one chance to make this decision and it needs to be the right one and as such we will continue to consult with our Members, broadcasters, partners, governments and players and to ensure that we make a well informed decision."

Jesse Lingard, former WBC cruiserweight champion Tony Bellew and ex-England cricket captain Michael Vaughan were among the sports stars who revealed the team bases for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup.

The tournament will take place in England next year, with matches shared between 18 venues for the men's World Cup and the final to be held at Old Trafford.

On Wednesday, the team bases were confirmed, with Manchester United and England midfielder Lingard kicking things off with confirmation Manchester would be hosting England and Australia.

Bellew was then on hand to provide tips on Merseyside to Tonga star Konrad Hurrell and coach Kristian Woolf, with their side – along with Italy – to be based in Liverpool and St Helens.

There was also confirmation that New Zealand would be based in York, Samoa in Doncaster and Papua New Guinea in Warrington – with Warrington Wolves fan Stuart Pearce joining the announcement.

Fiji will be hosted in Hull, while Lebanon have been placed in Wigan and Leigh, and France will be based in Bolton.

Wales and Scotland will be located in Preston and Newcastle respectively, and boxer Josh Warrington was on hand to inform Ireland and Jamaica of their place in Leeds.

Sheffield was the final team base to be confirmed, with Johnny Nelson – the longest reigning cruiserweight of all time – and Vaughan announcing the city as Greece's home for the tournament.

Sir Richard Hadlee was a bowler of unparalleled skill. He moved the ball both ways, in the air and off the pitch and could hit any crack in a pitch from 17 yards with a consistency that was almost robotic.

Hadlee improved at everything he did. Initially he was not the best at the ODI game, but over time he would improve to the point where Only Joel Garner, Dennis Lillee and Michael Holding could boast better averages than he did.

At the 1983 World Cup, Hadlee’s last, the New Zealand paceman conceded just 2.88 runs per over in 13 matches.

In his first 34 ODIs Hadlee only took 38 wickets at an average of 27.89 and a woeful strike rate of 50.5.

But from January 1982 until the end of his career in 1990, the pacer bowled in 81 matches. Over that period he took 120 wickets at an average of 19.55 and with a strike rate of 35.5.

  

Career Statistics

Full name: Richard John Hadlee

Born: July 3, 1951 (age 68), St Albans, Christchurch, Canterbury

Major teams: New Zealand, Canterbury, Marylebone Cricket Club, New Zealand Invitation XI, Nottinghamshire, Tasmania

Batting style: Left-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

Height: 6 ft 1 in

 

ODI Career:   New Zealand (1973-1990)

Mat    Inns    Balls    Runs   Wkts   BBI     BBM      Ave    Econ   SR    4w     5w     10w

115    112       6182   3407    158    5/25      5/25     21.56   3.30   39.1    1       5         0

 

Career Highlights

  • Captured 158 wickets from 115 matches at an average of 21.56
  • Took five 5-wicket hauls in ODIs
  • 1st player to 1000 runs and 100 wickets in ODIs

Shane Bond could have been the greatest bowler New Zealand ever produced had he the body for it. Unfortunately, the fearsome quick spent much of his time in international cricket on the injury table, but when he was fit, he was a problem for opposition batsmen the world over.

And that was largely his problem. Bond, who had to have titanium wire fused to his spine and had to manage numerous other issues with his knees and feet, would not slow down and take any intensity out of his deliveries.

Bowling at 150 kph and upward can take its toll on the body. But for batsmen, it meant a ball fighting the friction of the air around it and swinging when it was three-quarters of the way to you. At that pace, there is not much adjusting that can be done.

Bond would help New Zealand to the semi-final of the World Cup in 2007 but even before that his 6-23 against Australia four years earlier in Hobart was a wonderful example of the devastation he could wreak.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Shane Edward Bond

Born: June 7, 1975 (44), Christchurch, Canterbury

Major teams: New Zealand, Canterbury, Delhi Giants, Hampshire, Kolkata Knight Riders, Warwickshire

Playing role: Bowler

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

ODI Career:   New Zealand (2002-2010)

Mat    Inns    Balls     Runs    Wkts    BBI     BBM     Ave     Econ     SR      4w     5w    10w

82         80     4295     3070      147    6/19    6/19      20.88   4.28      29.2     7        4       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Fastest New Zealander to reach the 100-wicket mark in ODIs
  • 3rd fastest ever to reach the 100-wicket mark in ODIs
  • Collected 147 wickets in 82 ODIs at an average of 20.88

He began as a left-arm spinner but gradually established himself as more of an all-rounder in the Test arena. With his preference for good technique, his batting did not flourish in the ODI game, but he was still a useful lower-order, left-handed batsman with four half-centuries.

He was the youngest New Zealander to play One Day International cricket, just as was the case for Tests.

Gradually the drift became more pronounced; the spin and bounce more controlled and cannier. Today, Vettori is New Zealand's leading ODI wicket-taker.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Daniel Luca Vettori

Born: January 27, 1979 (age 41), Auckland, New Zealand

Height: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)

Batting style: Left-handed

Bowling style: Slow left-arm orthodox

Playing role: Allrounder

 

ODI Career: New Zealand (1997-2015)

Mat      Inns      Balls     Runs     Wkts    BBI    BBM     Ave       Econ     SR      4w    5w    10w

295       277       14060    9674     305       5/7     5/7      31.71     4.12      46.0     8        2       0

 

Career Highlights

  • Took 305 wickets from 295 matches at 31.71
  • Most wickets by a Kiwi in ODIs
  • Eight 4-wicket hauls and two 5-wicket hauls in ODIs

Rugby Football Union (RFU) chief executive Bill Sweeney is hopeful England will not have to play autumn internationals behind closed doors at Twickenham.

England are due to host New Zealand, Argentina, Tonga and Australia in November but there are doubts over whether fans will be allowed in due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Sweeney stressed the importance of supporters being able to attend for financial reasons and, with lockdown measures being gradually eased, he is optimistic Eddie Jones' side will not have to run out in an empty stadium.

"Playing behind closed doors - for us - is not much different to the games being cancelled," he told BBC Sport.

"By the time you fire up the stadium, pay for the players and the costs associated with preparation time and camps, when you play behind closed doors for us, there is not a huge difference between that and the games not taking place.

"Having attendance and having fans turning up is key."

Sweeney added: "If things progress as they seem to be progressing now, hopefully we will see crowds at Twickenham in October and November."

RFU boss Sweeney says alternative options are being explored if southern hemisphere teams are unable to head north.

"The preference from both the north and the south is that the original programme will go ahead," he said.

"But there are two or three different options that feature more northern hemisphere competition around that autumn window.

"One of them is you'd play a Six Nations tournament in that autumn that would combine with fixtures next year and for the first time ever you'd have home and away.

"Every [plan] has pros and cons to it and those are being evaluated."

Shane Warne made an indelible mark on the Ashes on this day in 1993.

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