Stuart Broad continued his dominance of David Warner as England took three wickets before lunch on day four at The Oval after Australia were set a mammoth 399 for a series victory.

England were bowled out for 329 early on a glorious Sunday in London, setting the tourists – already assured of retaining the urn – an unlikely target to secure a 3-1 triumph.

The wondrous Steve Smith was unbeaten 18 on at the end of the morning session, but Australia – seeking a first series win in England since 2001 – were up against it on 68-3 after losing Warner, Marcus Harris and Marnus Labuschagne.

Broad matched a Test record by dismissing Warner (11) for the seventh time in the series and also got rid of Harris (nine) before Jack Leach sent Labuschagne (14) on his way.

England added only 16 runs to their overnight total after resuming on 313-8, Jofra Archer gloving Pat Cummins (2-67) behind and Nathan Lyon (4-69) seeing the back of Leach to end the innings.

Broad smashed Cummins for two sixes into the leg side before Leach fell and the paceman did more damage with the ball to leave Australia in trouble on 29-2.

Australia's highest opening stand of 18 was ended when Harris – who needed seven stitches in his left hand after splitting the webbing when dropping Joe Denly on day two – lost his off stump to the paceman.

Warner was unable to end a miserable series with the bat on a high note, edging Broad to Rory Burns in the slips and departing to a chorus of boos.

The prolific Smith got off the mark with a glorious cover drive off Archer and was still there at lunch along with Matthew Wade (10no) after Labuschagne was smartly stumped by Jonny Bairstow when Leach got one to turn past his outside edge.

Australia have been set 399 runs to win the Ashes series 3-1 after England were bowled out early on day four of the final Test at The Oval.

England were dismissed for 329 in their second innings after resuming on 313-8 on a glorious Sunday in London, Jofra Archer falling for only three before Jack Leach (nine) was dismissed by Nathan Lyon (4-69).

Australia successfully reviewed after Archer was given not out by umpire Marais Erasmus when he gloved Pat Cummins (2-67) behind in the second over of the day.

Stuart Broad smashed Cummins for two sixes in an over but was left stranded on 12 when Leach was taken by Josh Hazlewood attempting to hit Lyon for a boundary.

Australia face a huge run chase under blue skies as they eye a first Ashes win in England since 2001, with Joe Root's side strong favourites to salvage a 2-2 draw a week after a defeat at Old Trafford gave them no chance of regaining the urn.

Joe Denly and Ben Stokes pressed home England's advantage with an unbroken century stand in a wicket-less afternoon session on day three of the final Ashes Test at The Oval.

England, striving to secure a 2-2 series draw after the tourists retained the urn at Old Trafford, were 193-2 at tea on a sunny Saturday in London - leading by 262 runs on a good pitch.

Nathan Lyon removed Rory Burns (20) and Joe Root (21) before lunch, but Denly was unbeaten on his highest Test score of 82 not out after putting on 106 for the third wicket with Stokes (57no).

Stokes was dropped on seven by Steve Smith, while Denly - whose wife gave birth to their second child this week  - was fortunate not to be given out leg before off Mitchell Marsh after being put down by Marcus Harris on day three.

Harris was unable to field after having seven stitches in his left hand to repair split webbing sustained when he spilled Denly before he had got off the mark on Friday.

Burns and Denly started positively after England resumed on nine without loss, but the highest opening stand of the series was halted at 54 when the left-hander chased a wide one from Lyon and feathered behind.

Root fell tamely, edging the spinner to Smith at first slip before lunch, and Stokes should have departed in the same fashion, only for the best Test batsman in the world to drop a simple chance.

Denly, struck on the box by Pat Cummins in the morning session, had a fourth Test half-century courtesy of a wristy boundary off Josh Hazlewood.

Stokes swept Lyon for four and six off back-to-back deliveries and there was more frustration for Australia when Denly survived an lbw appeal off Marsh that should have been answered in the affirmative and Tim Paine opted not to review.

Vice-captain Stokes, playing as a specialist batsman due to a shoulder injury, raised his bat after hammering a Marnus Labuschagne full toss for six. Denly then brought up the century stand by driving the spinner for four as he closed in on a maiden Test hundred.

Nathan Lyon dismissed Rory Burns and Joe Root but England were in a strong position at lunch on day three of the final Ashes Test at The Oval.

Lyon removed Burns for 20 to end an opening stand of 54 - the highest of the series - and also accounted for Root (21) to leave England 88-2 at the interval, leading by 157 runs.

The positive Joe Denly, whose wife gave birth to their second child ahead of day two, was unbeaten on 37 as England continued their attempt to salvage a 2-2 draw after the tourists retained the urn at Old Trafford.

Marcus Harris was off the field with seven stitches in his left hand to repair split webbing sustained when he dropped Denly without scoring late on day two and the England batsman inflicted more pain on his fellow opener on a sunny Saturday morning.

Denly stated his intent by hitting Pat Cummins down the ground for four in the first over of the day and Burns cut Josh Hazlewood to the boundary in a great start for England after they resumed on nine without loss.

Lyon was given the treatment by Denly in the spinner's opening set of six, the right-hander dispatching him over his head for four with disdain and again using his feet superbly to launch the next delivery for a straight six.

Burns brought up the fifty partnership with a glorious off-drive for four off Peter Siddle, but trudged off on his home ground after chasing a wide ball from Lyon and feathering a catch to Tim Paine.

Both umpires had a word with Matthew Wade after he welcomed Root with some verbals and Denly was on his knees wincing when Cummins struck him on the box.

England were ticking along nicely until Lyon accounted for Root 10 minutes prior to lunch after a change of ends, the captain tamely edging to slip.

Josh Hazlewood struck the final blow as Australia beat battling England by 185 runs on a tense final day of the fourth Test at a raucous Old Trafford to retain the urn.

England resumed on Sunday in deep trouble on 18-2 and needing a highly improbable 383 to win, but more realistically to bat out for a draw which would give them the chance of a series victory with one match remaining at The Oval next week. 

The outstanding Pat Cummins (4-43) removed Jason Roy and Headingley hero Ben Stokes before lunch, but England had hope of saving the match when they were six wickets down at tea, with Joe Denly (53) one of only two men to depart in the afternoon session.

England continued to show resistance as Jos Buttler made 34 off 111 balls on his 29th birthday, while Craig Overton and Jack Leach also dug in with the backing of a packed crowd in Manchester.

Overton and Leach fended off 14 overs in a gritty ninth-wicket stand before part-time spinner Marnus Labuschagne got rid of his fellow tweaker - who soaked up 51 balls after being promoted above Stuart Broad - to silence a lively crowd.

After the clocked ticked into the final hour with 13.3 overs remaining, Hazlewood ended Overton's defiant knock of 21 off 105 deliveries to dismiss England for 197, sparking wild Australia celebrations as they avoided more final-day agony and took a 2-1 lead. 

 

Jos Buttler and Craig Overton continued to frustrate Australia's bid to polish off the final four wickets required to beat England in the fourth Test at Old Trafford and retain the Ashes.

Nathan Lyon ended the resistance of Joe Denly (53) and Mitchell Starc dismissed Jonny Bairstow on a tense Sunday afternoon in Manchester to leave England 166-6 at tea.

Buttler, on his 29th birthday, dug in for a gritty 30 from 96 balls and a battling Overton will resume after the break on 12, with England needing to bat out another 36 overs for a draw to keep the series alive with a new ball soon available.

The outstanding Pat Cummins (4-41) saw the back of Jason Roy (31) and Headingley hero Ben Stokes (one) before lunch after a frustrating start for the tourists on a good pitch.

Buttler and Overton - who successfully overturned a leg before decision - put on 28 and, more importantly, stayed together for 15.5 overs to give England some hope of pulling off another great escape a fortnight after an astonishing win in Leeds.

Roy got forward with conviction in the first hour and Denly - who switched places with his partner for this Test to open - also dug in after England resumed on 18-2.

A positive Roy hit Starc for four with a glorious cover drive, but was gone when Cummins removed his off stump with a brilliant delivery, which nipped back through the gate at the end of the 18th over of the day.

Stokes came out to a huge roar, but was soon heading back to the pavilion looking dejected after inside-edging a pumped-up Cummins behind, walking off without the finger being raised by umpire Marais Erasmus in a huge moment late in the morning session.

Denly had a second half-century in as many Tests when he punched Cummins down the ground to the boundary just after lunch, but fended Lyon to Marnus Labuschagne at short leg to become the spinner's first victim of the match.

Bairstow (25) and Buttler looked comfortable as they played with a mixture of attack and defence, but Starc ended a sixth-wicket stand of 45 by snaring the former leg before with the first ball after a drinks break.

Overton was given a reprieve after being given out lbw for five, with the third umpire taking a long time to overturn the decision despite the fact Cummins' delivery appeared to strike the paceman's bat before hitting his pad outside the line of off stump.

Australia are still considering their options at the top of the order ahead of the fourth Ashes Test against England, says chairman of selectors Trevor Hohns.

The tourists were pegged back in the third match at Headingley as Ben Stokes' history-making innings levelled the series at 1-1 heading into the fourth Test at Old Trafford.

Australia had already been forced into changes in their batting line-up due to Steve Smith's absence with concussion, while opener Cameron Bancroft was dropped in Leeds following a tough start to the series.

Smith will come back in for the next match but it appears unlikely he will be the only returning face, although Marnus Labuschagne will likely be retained after impressing in the former captain's absence.

A tour match victory over Derbyshire - secured on Saturday by an innings and 54 runs - increased Australia's options as Mitchell Marsh, batting at number three, made 74.

Hohns said: "This game has given us a lot more options. We'll get to Manchester, hopefully have a look at the pitch, and go through what options we do have - and they are plenty.

"There are a couple of headaches there, but nice headaches, of course, and the important thing is that we come up with a balanced team now to win this next Test match.

"The area up the top is not so much concerning but it's been difficult for both teams at the top of the order. That's an area we'll certainly be looking at.

"Mitchell Marsh has given us a good option today. All players are in contention."

Matthew Wade would appear to be at risk, having failed to build on his 110 in the Ashes opener at Edgbaston with three single-figure dismissals since.

"He played very well that innings he made a hundred," Hohns said. "Unfortunately things have not quite gone his way since then. That will certainly be an area we are having a look at."

Labuschagne is also a "prime contender", Hohns acknowledged, having impressed since becoming Smith's concussion substitute and making history in the process.

The selector would not rule out bowling changes either, even if Nathan Lyon is "no doubt at all" after giving Australia a scare by twisting his ankle in a training game of touch rugby.

Mitchell Starc – who took 3-46 and 4-39 against Derbyshire - is an obvious candidate to come into the side having sat out the first three Tests, with Hohns adding: "He's certainly given us a good option there.

"We'll have a look at the pitch, of course, and we have heard that it is renowned for being possibly the quickest in the country. That will all be taken into account.

"Right from the start of the tour it was made very clear what was expected of our bowlers and where we wanted them to bowl.

"Mitchell has taken all that on board and he was worked very, very hard to improve his game in that area.

"We all know he is an aggressor, so we can't expect him to change the way he bowls too much. But he is doing everything he possibly can to bowl in the right areas and the right channels."

Derbyshire started Saturday's play on 53-3 and were skittled for 112, with Marsh (2-5) and Peter Siddle (2-21) joining Starc in the wickets.

Nathan Lyon sparked injury fears for Australia on Wednesday but his ankle issue is not believed to be serious.

The off-spinner, who moved past the great Dennis Lillee and on to 357 Test wickets during last week's remarkable one-wicket defeat to England at Headingley, twisted his ankle during a game of touch rugby ahead of Australia's tour match with Derbyshire.

However, Omnisport understands Lyon sat out the remainder of the training session as a mere precaution and, had he been in similar pain during a Test match, he would have stayed on the field.

The 31-year-old was at the centre of two huge flashpoints as a stunning contest in Leeds reached its conclusion, with Ben Stokes' magnificent 135 not out tying the series at 1-1 heading into next week's fourth Test at Old Trafford.

When England needed two runs to win, Lyon fumbled a simple run-out chance with last man Jack Leach well short of his ground.

Stokes thumped four of his eight sixes off Lyon, but the all-rounder survived a strong lbw appeal with next the delivery after Leach's run-out scare.

Replays indicated the ball would have gone on to hit the stumps, although Australia had used up their final review during the previous over, leaving Stokes to lash Pat Cummins through the covers and complete one of the most remarkable comeback wins in Test history.

Star batsman Steve Smith will return from his concussion absence in the three-day game at Derby, which starts on Thursday.

Usman Khawaja will captain the side, with Alex Carey called in from his stint at Sussex to keep wicket – allowing captain Tim Paine to rest up alongside Lyon, Cummins, David Warner, Travis Head, Josh Hazlewood and James Pattinson from the XI in action at Headingley.

Left-arm paceman Mitchell Starc and right-arm seamer Peter Siddle will look to press their claims for inclusion in Manchester, the former having yet to feature in the Test series.

Tim Paine refused to blame Australia's astonishing Headingley loss on umpire Joel Wilson who failed to spot Ben Stokes was lbw right before he became England's match-winner.

Stokes made an unbeaten 135 and struck the winning runs as England chased down a record 359 in the third Test to claim a one-wicket victory and prevent Australia retaining the urn with two matches to spare.

The all-rounder was part of a last-wicket stand worth 76 with Jack Leach, but Australia were convinced that alliance had been broken when England still needed two runs to win as Stokes was wrapped on the pads by Nathan Lyon when attempting to slog-sweep.

With Lyon shrieking in appeal, Wilson remained unmoved, and Australia captain Paine was unable to call upon DRS having squandered his final review when he unsuccessfully challenged a not-out lbw decision against Leach in the previous over.

Had Australia reviewed the decision not to give Stokes out, umpire Wilson's call would have been reversed and Paine's side would have retained the urn.

Asked if he had seen that replay back, Paine said: "No, I saw it live. That's all I needed to see. I don't want to watch that again."

Wilson came under fire for his poor decision-making in the first Test at Headingley, yet Paine pointed to his own inability to make the correct calls rather than lay the blame at the umpire's door.

"I have no issue with that, we can't control that," Paine said of the umpiring.

"I don't think I've got a referral correct the whole series so I can't sit here and bag the umpires and we have got to focus on what we can control, and umpiring decisions isn't one of them.

"I'm sure it is something that will be written about, but we also had other opportunities to win the game and opportunities on other days with our batting and we didn't take them. So to sit down and single out an umpire is unnecessary, he is no different to everyone else - he is allowed to make mistakes."

However, Stokes was perplexed that the ball tracking even showed Lyon's delivery would have gone on to hit the stumps.

"I have seen the DRS on my lbw shout, which obviously shows up with three reds [for out], but DRS has got that completely wrong as it flicked my front pad first and didn't spin," Stokes argued.

"It shows how crucial it is to make sure you use your reviews. When you get to a situation like that, you still need one.

"If they had one they would have used it and ended up winning. I still cannot believe it was three reds. I thought as soon as it hit me that it was sliding down leg because there was no spin."

Ben Stokes and Jonny Bairstow's unbroken 79-run stand had England believing they could keep the Ashes alive by recording an incredible win over Australia at Headingley.

Chasing 359 for victory in the third Test - a target which would represent England's highest successful chase in the longest format - only one wicket fell in the morning session as Stokes and Bairstow, unbeaten on 32 and 34 respectively, not only saw off the threat of the new ball but prospered.

The pendulum swung in Australia's favour when England captain Joe Root (77) charged at Nathan Lyon and an inside edge onto his pad looped over wicketkeeper Tim Paine before David Warner flung himself across to take a brilliant catch.

Just three runs had been added to the overnight total of 156-3 at that point but Stokes and Bairstow cut loose and darted between the wickets as Australia, seeking a victory that would ensure they retained the urn, became increasingly frustrated with England 238-4 at lunch, 121 runs from victory.

Stokes had made two from 50 deliveries on Saturday and was struck on the helmet by a Josh Hazlewood bouncer, the ball shattering the batsman's neck guard, during a 25-ball scoreless start to the first session.

However, after Root fell, both he and Bairstow looked to take the attack to Australia, with Stokes at one point pulling Pat Cummins for a maximum as England dared to dream.

Rory Burns had no concerns about tackling Australia's pace attack and is backing England's bowlers, including Jofra Archer, to strike back against the tourists on day three.

Burns' 53 was crucial to England on day two of the second Ashes Test at Lord's, with the hosts stumbling to 258 all out.

Jonny Bairstow also scored a half-century before being caught by Usman Khawaja - who squandered a great chance to dismiss Burns earlier in the day.

England finished the day on a high, Stuart Broad dismissing David Warner as Australia managed to get to 30-1 at stumps.

Broad's fellow opening bowler Archer - on his England Test debut - wasted little time in getting stuck into Australia's order, delivering several bouncers as the light faded.

Australia's pacemen had shown a similar lack of mercy earlier in proceedings, with Burns receiving rough treatment, while Pat Cummins struck Chris Woakes on the helmet.

But England's opener had few issues with facing such fierce bowling.

"[Feeling] pretty good. It’s always nice to get in a scrap a little bit," Burns told a news conference.

"I got two in the same spot, which was nice. I got in amongst it and tried to tough it out.

"It's quite an obvious tactic of what they can do. The boys are preparing for it and in this game we can dish out some of our own again."

Asked if he believed Archer would be targeting Australia's batsmen with short deliveries, Burns added: "I'd have thought so. He copped a fair few so he's probably looking forward to getting his own back."

Australia spinner Nathan Lyon, who took three wickets, is not especially relishing facing Archer.

"Mate, I can't bat. What do you reckon?" Lyon joked when asked about the prospect in his news conference.

"Even though I can't bat, I'll give it a go. Unless you want to do it for me!"

Nathan Lyon conceded it felt special to match Australia great Dennis Lillee's haul of Test wickets as the tourists again took control against England in the Ashes.

Following their rampant 251-run win at Edgbaston in the series opener, Australia asked England to bat at Lord's and wasted little time getting among their opponents after a first-day washout.

Rory Burns and Jonny Bairstow offered the most telling resistance with half-centuries, but three wickets apiece from off-spinner Lyon and seamers Pat Cummins and Josh Hazlewood saw England dismissed for 258.

Bairstow was the last man out, caught by Usman Khawaja on the midwicket boundary – a moment that moved Lyon on to 355 scalps alongside celebrated paceman Lillee.

"I have always said I'm not about personal milestones or personal achievements, it’s about winning Test matches for Australia," Lyon told reporters after his side reached 30 for one at stumps, with Stuart Broad once again accounting for David Warner.

"I wasn't actually aware of it. I struggle to see myself up there with the likes of Lillee, [Shane] Warne, [Glenn] McGrath.

"To me they're greats of the game and I'm just some guy trying to bowl off-breaks.

"It's a special moment and hopefully a few more will come."

The recalled Hazlewood and Cummins, the latter who peppered England's batsman with a ferocious spell of short bowling after lunch, turned in performances that would undoubtedly have won Lillee's approval.

Burns was dropped by Khawaja, and Lyon felt Australia could have been in an even more commanding position.

"I don't think we have had our best day, we dropped a few catches," he said.

"But if we are batting at the end of the day we are pretty happy. We want to be a team that, no matter what we do first, we are competing and playing a positive brand of cricket."

Tim Paine backed Nathan Lyon to keep bowling "as long as he wants to" after his star showing on day five of Australia's victory over England in the opening Ashes Test.

Steve Smith's second century of the match and three figures from Matthew Wade on Sunday meant England needed to bat out the day on Monday to avoid defeat at Edgbaston.

But the day-five conditions were perfect for a spinner of Lyon's quality and he took 6-49 to help dismiss the hosts for just 146.

In the process, Lyon became just the fourth Australian to rack up 350 Test wickets and captain Paine waxed lyrical about his quality.

"He could get plenty [of wickets] for as long as he wants to go for I reckon, he doesn't seem to have too many injuries or niggles over his career," he said. 

"The ball is coming out better than ever, he's a bit like Smithy [Steve Smith], every Test match or series they seem to get better – it's astonishing at their age. 

"If you see them train you see why, they're a great example to the group."

Steve Smith and David Warner were playing their first Test since their respective involvements in the Newlands ball-tampering scandal that shocked cricket last year.

And Paine welcomed having the experienced duo back in the dressing room.

"Yeah it certainly helps. As I said before the game those guys have played a lot more cricket in England than I have and more big tournaments and big series than I have," he added. 

"The same goes for all of our team, it's not only helping me with way they lead our group. We're all tapping into them whether captain, coach or batting coach.

"They have things they've learnt through experience that others don't know. We'd be foolish not to tap into that, they've still got a huge presence in our dressing room there's no doubt about that."

Australia completed a resounding 251-run victory on day five to seal the opening Ashes Test as Nathan Lyon tormented sorry England with a sublime six-for at Edgbaston.

The heroics of centurions Steve Smith and Matthew Wade a day previous set England a near-impossible 398 target and their only realistic chance of avoiding defeat was to bat out the day for a draw.

But predictions that a wearing day-five pitch would be suited to the spinning skills of Lyon bore fruit and he finished with 6-49, becoming the fourth Australian to rack up 350 Test wickets in the process.

Pat Cummins added 4-32 and now has 100 Test wickets as England played like the proverbial deer in the headlights to fall behind in the five-match series.

The inquest will now begin for England, who had Australia at 122-8 in the first innings before the first of Smith's centuries brought the tourists back into the match.

Even still, England held a 90-run lead heading into the second innings but their inability to remove Smith proved costly in an enthralling contest and the Australians now have the psychological edge with their star batsman in phenomenal form.

Tim Paine's side head to Lord's with a 1-0 lead having ended an 18-year wait for an Edgbaston win in any format, while it marks just England's second defeat in 15 Test matches at the venue.

England would have been relatively content with the opening hour despite the loss of first-innings centurion Rory Burns (11) when a short one from Cummins was gloved to Lyon at gully.

Jason Roy (28) and Joe Root made 41 for the second wicket, only for the former to make a complete hash of attacking a Lyon delivery that turned through the gap.

Lyon quickly added Joe Denly (11), who wastefully reviewed when there was clearly a nick on a looped one to Cameron Bancroft at short leg, and the same combination snared the crucial wicket of Root – who England really needed to bat most of the day – with the fielder snaffling a sharp take.

It left England 85-4 by lunch and the situation did not improve in the afternoon session, Cummins ripping up Jos Buttler's off stump before Jonny Bairstow gloved the same man to the slips.

When Ben Stokes edged Lyon behind to gleeful Australia captain Paine the writing was on the wall.

Chris Woakes tried to delay the inevitable with an enterprising 37, but the out-of-sorts Moeen Ali and Stuart Broad had no answer to Lyon and Cummins accounted for Woakes with a short delivery to bring an end to proceedings.


LYON ROARS INTO ELITE AUSSIE CLUB

Lyon joined an elite club when it comes to Test scalps for Australia - only Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and Dennis Lillee have also made it to 350.

All the focus pre-match was on the tourists' pace attack and which options they may use to try and cut down England. While the trio selected played their part throughout the Test, it was instead the one frontline spin bowler who was left to take centre stage on a worn surface.


STICK OR TWIST? NEITHER HELP OUT ENGLAND

The home side must be wondering where it all went wrong, having reduced Australia to 122-8 on the opening day. Coming to the ground on Monday, they always faced a tough order to survive and keep the series level heading to Lord's.

Their top-order batsmen attempted different methods to cope with Lyon, though none worked for a sustained period. Roy's adventurous march down the pitch will draw criticism, but even the reliable Root succumbed when choosing the more defensive approach. With issues over the form and fitness of key players, England's selectors have plenty to ponder in the break between games.


MOMENT OF THE DAY

The longevity of Root's innings was always likely to be crucial to England's chances of survival. But the skipper was sent on his way after a fine pouch by Bancroft shortly before lunch. Had Root managed to hold on England may have still maintained some hope of a draw, but Australia's celebrations told a story in itself.


KEY OPTA FACTS:

- Lyon has become only the seventh spinner ever to record 350 Test wickets.
- Cummins has now taken 100 Test wickets (21 matches); no Australian bowler has got there faster since 1937 (Bill O'Reilly - 20).
- No bowler has dismissed Root more often in Tests than Lyon (five).
- Denly has scored more than 23 just once in eight Test innings for England.
- Buttler has failed to score more than five runs in four of his eight Test innings in 2019.

Nathan Lyon struck three times as Australia boosted their chances of victory in the first Ashes Test by reducing England to 85-4 by lunch on day five.

The hosts resumed at Edgbaston on 13-0 chasing an unlikely 398 in the fourth innings, with a more realistic aim being to bat out the day to salvage a draw.

However, their survival hopes were hurt when they lost first-innings centurion Rory Burns for 11, the opener getting into a terrible tangle when trying to deal with a short delivery from Pat Cummins, leading to the ball taking the glove and looping kindly to Lyon at gully.

Captain Joe Root joined Jason Roy (28) and the pair added 41 for the second wicket before the latter perished trying to take the positive approach to Lyon, the ball turning through the gap between bat and pad to hit middle stump after he had given the off-spinner the charge.

Lyon then combined with Cameron Bancroft to dismiss Joe Denly (11) and Root before the interval, both right-handers pouched at short leg following inside edges.

Root had twice used the review system to overturn lbw decisions given by umpire Joel Wilson, though there was no doubt over his dismissal as Bancroft snared a sharp chance straight off the bat to send England's skipper on his way for 28.

Jos Buttler ended the session unbeaten on one with Ben Stokes still yet to get off the mark, the pair facing a monumental task as England aim to avoid falling 1-0 behind in the five-match series.

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