There was chaos at Lord's on Sunday as England won the Cricket World Cup, beating New Zealand in the final in scarcely believable fashion.

An incredible clash went all the way to a Super Over and a boundary count to decide the winner after the scores were tied, with Ben Stokes' heroic effort to get England back into the match absolutely vital.

Plenty has been said and written about Stokes, his bizarre accidental six and the Super Over, but a lot of the finer details of the match were lost amid the noise.

We take a look at five key factors in England's win that might have been missed.

 

MIXED REVIEWS FROM NEW ZEALAND OPENERS

It did not take long for this absorbing contest to spark intrigue as the New Zealand openers had contrasting fortunes with reviews. Henry Nicholls' decision to go upstairs was a good one as replays showed Chris Woakes' delivery, initially ruled lbw, was going over the top and the batsman went on to make 55. Martin Guptill's call when he was dismissed was less impressive.

Woakes beat him on the inside edge and Guptill unwisely asked to take another look, throwing away a review. There was then no option open to Ross Taylor, who would have escaped after being pinned by Mark Wood.

WILLIAMSON'S FAILURE MORE COSTLY THAN ROOT'S

Both Kane Williamson and Joe Root enjoyed outstanding World Cups and were fully deserving of their places in the official team of the tournament. But neither man truly fired at Lord's on Sunday, with Williamson gone for 30 from 53 balls and Root even more sluggish with seven off 30.

Tom Latham still performed admirably after the New Zealand captain went, reaching 47, yet they went 92 balls without a boundary at one stage and failed to truly kick on. Williamson ended the tournament with 50 fours but was badly missed in those middle overs - especially considering boundary count became the final tie-breaker.

SANTNER DUCKS FINAL BALL TO SET 242

This really was a match of fine margins, with both teams scoring the same number of runs in their regular innings and then again in the Super Over. Every tiny error could be perceived as costly and there was a bizarre moment as Mitchell Santner inexplicably limited New Zealand's scoring at 241-8.

Jofra Archer sent in a slower-ball bouncer to end the Black Caps innings and Santner, with nothing to lose, ducked out of the way. That decision eased England's chase by a tiny but decisive margin.

DE GRANDHOMME DESPERATELY UNFORTUNATE

He might not have been an obvious hero, but had New Zealand held on in the fast and furious finale, Colin de Grandhomme could have been considered the match-winner. England's target of 242 was relatively modest but they were strangled by De Grandhomme, who took 1-25, having dropped Jonny Bairstow in his first over.

His was the most economical 10-over spell in a World Cup final since 1992 when Derek Pringle claimed 3-22. Like Pringle, though, his efforts were ultimately in vain.

BLACK CAPS' SPORTSMANSHIP EVIDENT AGAIN

Three sixes off the final two overs of England's innings did the damage for New Zealand. But while much has been made of the ludicrous nature of the third, as Ben Stokes accidently nudged a throw to the boundary, Guptill deserves credit for his honesty following the maximum that kickstarted England's surge.

Stokes looked to have been denied at the fence by Trent Boult, but the left-armer stepped on the boundary before unloading for Guptill to take the catch. In a fine show of sportsmanship, for which New Zealand were lauded throughout the tournament, Guptill immediately signalled for six.

England's Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow walked to the crease with the eyes of the cricket world on them.

The pre-tournament favourites and hosts were on the brink of a surprising Cricket World Cup elimination, knowing victories against India - and then New Zealand - were virtually essential to book a place in the semi-finals.

A string of unexpected defeats, defined by unsuccessful run chases, had a nation on edge, but on this occasion at least, against India, Roy and Bairstow had the chance to write the script. The chance to set the tone. The chance to keep England's World Cup dreams alive.

A breathtaking 160-run partnership in just 22.1 overs followed, the England pair negotiating their way through a tricky opening period before freeing the arms in the fashion fans have come to expect.

Roy, back from a hamstring injury, had the best seat in the house as a fired-up Bairstow thrashed 10 fours and six sixes in a scintillating 111. 

Bairstow's opening partner fell for 66 but the damage was done, England pushing to a total of 337-7 that would prove far too much for India.

Another must-win match followed and so did a big opening partnership.

Roy (60) and Bairstow (106) added 123 in 18.4 overs on this occasion, again setting the platform for a 300-plus score that England's bowlers comfortably defended against New Zealand.

England then headed into a semi-final against the old enemy, Australia, with their mojo back. 

And the attacking brand of cricket that saw England claim the world number one ranking in the 50-over format was on full display in that contest, too.

Roy and Bairstow faced a different challenge, chasing on that occasion, but the result was exactly the same: another 100-plus partnership in quick time. 

Set 224 for victory, Roy was the main aggressor this time, walloping five sixes in a 65-ball 85 before an unjust dismissal. Bairstow added 34, too, as they wiped 124 from the target in 17.2 overs, effectively ending the game as a contest with a mix of timing, game awareness and, of course, customary aggression.

The contribution of new-ball bowlers Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer in England's recent resurgence cannot be denied, but it is Roy and Bairstow who have been the driving forces.

Of the 14 century-plus partnerships for the first wicket at the World Cup, Roy and Bairstow have provided four in just seven attempts. A 95-run partnership between the duo came in a clash against West Indies, too.

And the pair's importance to England was highlighted by the three matches that Roy missed. England lost two of those, stand-in James Vince and Bairstow combining for opening stands of 44, 1 and 0.

All of that means that the New Zealand camp will arrive at Lord's on Sunday having spent honours analysing, reviewing, fretting and plotting. Just how do they get Roy and Bairstow early?

England's success at the top of the order comes in stark contrast to New Zealand's early efforts with the bat.

The Black Caps have only produced only one opening stand of 100 runs or more at the World Cup, Martin Guptill and the now-dropped Colin Munro providing it against Sri Lanka in the third match of the tournament, almost six weeks ago.

Guptill and Munro combined for an unbeaten 137-run union on that occasion but the opening partnerships since - 35, 0, 12, 0, 5, 29, 2 and 1 - make grim reading for New Zealand fans.

Munro lost his place after a six-wicket defeat to Pakistan but his replacement, Henry Nicholls, has scored just 36 runs in three matches. Guptill, the leading run-scorer at the 2015 World Cup with 547, has managed only 167 in eight matches at the 2019 edition, and that tally includes a first-up 73 not out.

"No one is more frustrated than what I am," Guptill told 1 News.

The consequence of New Zealand's poor opening partnerships is an unhealthy reliance on captain Kane Williamson and, to a lesser extent, veteran Ross Taylor. And while the experienced pair have continued to dig their side out of trouble, another poor start in the final could prove costly.

Roy and Bairstow have provided England with an incredible source of momentum throughout this World Cup.

One more match-defining partnership from the pair will go a long way to helping England win the tournament for the first time.

New Zealand captain Kane Williamson lauded the Black Caps for another ruthless performance after sealing a one-day international series win over Bangladesh.

The Black Caps took a 2-0 lead in the three-match series after an eight-wicket victory in Christchurch on Saturday.

Martin Guptill (118) and Williamson (65 not out) saw the hosts easily past their target of 227 with 83 balls to spare.

The display pleased Williamson, who praised his bowlers for taking advantage of favourable early conditions.

"Another clinical performance from us, which is sort of what we're wanting, what we're asking," he told Sky Sport.

"Guys are coming out and playing their roles.

"I thought the lads in the first half with the ball in hand were outstanding. There was a little bit there for us with the overcast conditions and we did get a bit out of the surface, which was nice, and we were able to take those regular wickets which is important."

Guptill's century was his 16th in ODIs, moving level with Nathan Astle and second only to Ross Taylor (20) for most for his nation.

The opener, who also scored a ton in the series opener, said his focus was on contributing for the Black Caps.

"You always go out there and do your best for the team first," Guptill told Sky Sport.

"Those sort of milestones come as a byproduct of that."

The final match of the ODI series is in Dunedin on Wednesday.

Martin Guptill led New Zealand to an eight-wicket win over Bangladesh to seal a one-day international series victory on Saturday.

Guptill (118) helped the Black Caps reach their target of 227 comfortably at Hagley Oval in Christchurch.

Kane Williamson made an unbeaten 65 as New Zealand won the second ODI to take a 2-0 lead in the three-match series, getting to their target in the 37th over.

Bangladesh earlier struggled in cloudy conditions, fighting to 226 all out after being reduced to 93-5 despite some poor fielding by the hosts.

The Black Caps opted to bowl in rainy conditions and Trent Boult (1-49) struck early, removing Liton Das (1).

A brief rain delay in the fifth over slowed New Zealand down, but the tourists were quickly in massive trouble, Matt Henry (1-30) trapping Tamim Iqbal (5) lbw.

But the hosts endured some difficulties in the field, dropping several catches, including Ross Taylor putting down Mushfiqur Rahim and Mohammad Mithun.

Taylor did hold onto a chance from Soumya Sarkar (22) off the wayward Colin de Grandhomme (1-25), while Mushfiqur (24) and Mahmudullah (7) fell relatively cheaply.

The drop off Mithun did hurt the Black Caps as he made 57 having been put down on five, although he suffered a hamstring injury during his innings.

Sabbir Rahman (43) and Mithun combined for a 75-run partnership that helped Bangladesh steady, but their total never looked enough, particularly after Guptill made another flying start.

Coming off an unbeaten century in Napier, Guptill helped the Black Caps make a good start alongside Henry Nicholls (14).

Guptill and Williamson then put on 143 for the second wicket, ensuring New Zealand's victory was never in doubt.

The hard-hitting opener notched his 16th ODI century – the equal second most for the Black Caps – before falling to Mustafizur Rahman (2-42), the hosts sealing a series win before the final match in Dunedin on Wednesday.

Martin Guptill's unbeaten century led New Zealand to a comfortable eight-wicket victory over Bangladesh in the first match of the one-day international series.

The hosts dominated in Napier as Bangladesh failed to bat for the full 50 overs and were bowled out for 232, which represented a recovery after they had slumped to 42-4.

With Trent Boult (3-40) and Mitchell Santner (3-45) having done the damage with the ball, Guptill took the lead with the bat as he finished 117 not out off 116 deliveries to account for more than half of his team's total.

Bangladesh will look to level the three-match series when the two meet again in Christchurch on Friday.

It was evident the tourists were set for a struggle when Tamim Iqbal (5) fell to a deceptive Boult outswinger in the second over.

That set the tone for the opening overs as Liton Das (1) and Mushfiqur Rahim (5) went cheaply, while Soumya Sarkar's promising start was halted when Matt Henry had him caught and bowled for 30.

The most significant contribution came from Mohammad Mithun, whose 62 helped Bangladesh reach a moderately competitive total that was also boosted by Mohammad Saifuddin's 41.

However, it was a target the Black Caps had no trouble in chasing down and they had three figures on the board before Mehidy Hasan bowled Henry Nicholls (53) for Bangladesh's first breakthrough.

It did little to stifle New Zealand's progress and captain Kane Williamson (11) was the only other wicket to fall, with Guptill and Ross Taylor (45 not out) the men to see the Black Caps home.

Guptill – who chalked up his 15th ODI century – hit a huge six down the ground to level the scores and the single that followed confirmed victory with 33 balls to spare.

New Zealand opener Martin Guptill is set to return for the Black Caps' one-day international series against Bangladesh.

Guptill is in the squad for the three-game ODI series, pending a fitness test on Sunday, the Black Caps announced on Saturday.

The 32-year-old batsman was ruled out of the Twenty20 series against India with an aggravated disc in his lower back but Guptill is in line to return in Napier on Wednesday.

Guptill will partner Henry Nicholls atop the order if passed fit, while Colin Munro will replace captain Kane Williamson in the third game as the New Zealand skipper takes a pre-planned rest.

"It's an exciting time for the players and coaches alike as we look to sign-off our home summer of white-ball cricket," said New Zealand selector Gavin Larsen.

"Undoubtedly the World Cup is looming large, but we're very much focused on the series ahead and the type of cricket we want to play.

"We're delighted to have Martin back on the park for this series; he's a world-class player and an integral part of our one-day side.

"He and Henry did a good job opening up in Hamilton against India and they're a combination we want to see some more of in this series, before Colin returns to the top for the third game with Kane resting."

 

New Zealand ODI squad: Kane Williamson (c) (Games one and two), Todd Astle, Trent Boult, Colin de Grandhomme, Lockie Ferguson, Martin Guptill, Matt Henry, Tom Latham, Colin Munro (Game three), Jimmy Neesham, Henry Nicholls, Ross Taylor, Mitchell Santner, Tim Southee.

Martin Guptill has been ruled out of New Zealand's Twenty20 international series against India due to a back injury.

The opener failed a fitness test in Wellington on Monday, so all-rounder Jimmy Neesham has been brought into the squad.

New Zealand are hoping Guptill recovers in time for a one-day international series against Bangladesh, which starts a week on Wednesday.

"Unfortunately, Martin hasn't recovered in time for this T20 series - which is very condensed with three games over five days," said Black Caps coach Gary Stead.

"It's a shame as he's obviously a big part of our white-ball sides, but we've got to look at the big picture and ensure he gets the injury right.

"It's great to have Jimmy coming into the side after some encouraging ODI performances."

New Zealand and India play the first of three T20s at Westpac Stadium on Wednesday.

Martin Guptill scored a century and James Neesham starred with bat and ball as New Zealand sealed a comfortable 45-run win over Sri Lanka in the first ODI at Mount Maunganui.

Black Caps opener Guptill – who missed the limited-overs matches against Pakistan in October and November with a calf injury – smashed 138 for his 14th ODI hundred, before Neesham's incredible unbeaten 47 off just 13 deliveries led the hosts to 371-7 in their innings.

Niroshan Dickwella (76) and Danushka Gunathilaka's (43) 119-run partnership for the first wicket had Sri Lanka in a strong position at 119-0 in the 18th over, but Neesham (3-38) dismissed them in successive sets of six to change the complexion of the match.

Kusal Perera plundered a brilliant 102 off 86 balls to keep the tourists' hopes alive but, when he fell to Trent Boult (2-65) with fewer than five overs remaining, Sri Lanka's chances of snatching victory ended.

After Colin Munro (13) sent a leading edge off Lasith Malinga (2-78) for just 13, Guptill soon found his groove and claimed a trio of fours from the same Nuwan Pradeep (2-78) over, the exemplary timing displayed by him and captain Kane Williamson (76) proving key to a 163-run union.

Williamson got a fifty on his home ground with an intelligent flick before sending an inside edge from Pradeep onto his stumps as the second-wicket stand ended just 17 short of New Zealand's record, but Guptill was unperturbed and had his ton with a cover drive to the ropes.

Guptill's time was up when he sent Thisara Perera (2-80) to point, but Ross Taylor (54) kept the Black Caps ticking along, with three fours off Malinga helping him secure his 44th ODI fifty.

Debutant Tim Seifert was involved in a mix-up that saw Henry Nicholls (15) run out before falling to Malinga for 11, but Neesham gave the hosts a timely boost in stunning fashion with five maximums from a Thisara over that went for 34 runs.

Neesham ended New Zealand's innings with another six and he halted Sri Lanka's strong start when Gunathilaka sent him back to Seifert.

A misjudged drive made Dickwella the next to fall to Neesham, but Kusal did his best to keep the tourists in the hunt for an unlikely win.

However, after 13 fours and one maximum, a top-edge off Boult spelled the end for Kusal as New Zealand claimed a third straight win of the tour after back-to-back Test triumphs.

New Zealand have confirmed Martin Guptill will miss their upcoming limited-overs matches against Pakistan in the United Arab Emirates due to a calf strain. 

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