Joe Root and Joe Denly scored battling half-centuries but Australia remain on course to retain the Ashes after Josh Hazlewood struck twice on a glorious day three at Headingley.

England were humiliatingly bowled out for a pitiful 67 on the second day in Leeds and were set a highly unlikely 359 to level the series when the tourists were dismissed for 246 on Saturday.

The in-form Marcus Labuschagne showed great character and technique while riding his luck to make 80, with Ben Stokes taking 3-56 as England ended Australia's second innings in the morning session.

Captain Root (75not out) and the under-pressure Denly dug in to put on 126 for the third wicket after England were reduced to 15-2, but Hazlewood (2-35) removed the Kent batsman for exactly 50.

Root and his deputy Stokes were unbeaten at stumps, but England are still facing defeat at 156-3, needing a further 203 to win, with Tim Paine's side requiring seven wickets to go 2-0 up and keep the urn.

The tenacious Labuschagne was struck on the head by a Broad bouncer before being dropped by Jonny Bairstow off the same bowler on 60, having also been given three lives on day two as Australia's lead moved past 300 after they resumed on 171-6.

James Pattinson was caught by Root off Archer at first slip to end a seventh-wicket stand of 51 and Labuschagne soon required another check over from the doctor.

Archer rattled him on the grilled with a rapid bouncer, recalling the gripping battle the pair engaged in at Lord's last week.

Stokes saw the back of Pat Cummins and Labuschagne missed out on a hundred when he was run out by Denly, with Nathan Lyon chopping on to Archer to bring the innings to an end.

Rory Burns nicked Hazlewood to David Warner at first slip after lunch and the out-of-sorts Jason Roy followed in the next over, bowled by a brilliant delivery from Cummins that reduced England to 15-2.

The vast majority of a packed crowd would have been fearing a repeat of England's first-innings fiasco, but Denly and Root showed the resistance that had been so badly lacking on Friday to take tea on 90-2.

Denly took a blow on the helmet from Cummins but skipped down the track to dispatch Lyon down the ground for four and ran well with the busy Root, who drove the spinner to the cover boundary to reach his half-century.

Root successfully reviewed an lbw decision after inside edging a straight one from Hazlewood and Australia wasted a review for a Lyon leg-before shout against Denly.

He did not last much longer, though, falling caught behind after being rapped on the gloves by a hostile ball from Hazlewood after raising his bat for the second time in the longest format, leaving Root and Stokes to see England through to stumps.

 

 

Australia required eight further wickets to retain the Ashes as England finally showed some resistance through Joe Root and Joe Denly at Headingley.

Chasing a target of 359 - which would be the highest successful Test chase for England - the hosts went some way to making amends for their first-innings debacle by taking tea on 90-2.

Root, whose role as captain will be questioned should Australia emerge victorious, had made 41 having been out for first-ball and second-ball ducks in his previous two innings.

Denly, England's top scorer in their paltry 67 first time around with 12, survived three wafts outside off stump and being struck flush on the helmet by a Pat Cummins bouncer to reach 30 having made an unbroken 75 with Root for the third wicket in a partnership that had already lasted longer than England's entire first innings.

There was a sense of deja vu when Rory Burns (7) edged to first slip David Warner off Josh Hazlewood - the fielder having taken four catches in the first innings when the bowler returned 5-30.

England were then 15-2 when a rotten series from Jason Roy (8) continued, though he could at least point to a jaffa from Cummins that straightened and clipped off to leave the opener with an Ashes average of 9.50.

But Root and Denly finally restored some pride, even if a slice of history still appeared too distant with 269 more needed.

Josh Hazlewood was encouraged when England captain Joe Root was dismissed early on Friday, but even he could not have predicted the dominant position Australia would find themselves in by the end of the third Ashes Test's second day.

The urn appears set to be remaining Down Under after Australia, dismissed for 179 on Thursday, ripped through England and had them all out for 67 at Headingley before reaching stumps on 171-6, 283 runs ahead.

An Australia victory, which seems all-but certain at this stage, would ensure they cannot lose the best-of-five match series and therefore would retain the Ashes, and it was a 28-over spell on Friday - in which seamer Hazlewood returned 5-30 - that may determine the series.

England were embarrassed again, dismissed for 85 or less for the fourth time since March 2018 and falling to their lowest ever total at Headingley, and their lowest in an Ashes since 1948.

It was the prized wicket of England's number three Root - out for back-to-back ducks for the first time in his career - that gave Australia confidence another all-too-familiar capitulation could be on the cards.

"I certainly like him in there as early as possible," Hazlewood said of Root, whose promotion from four to three before the series has failed to pay off.

"They follow him a little bit, he's the leader, he's the captain, he's got the best average, he's their best batsman going by numbers.

"So if we can get him I think they can be vulnerable at times, same as any other team; if their best batter's out, you feel a bit more relaxed about your business."

Having conquered white-ball cricket by winning the World Cup on home soil last month, England's batsmen appeared trapped in one-day mode in the longest format.

Opener Jason Roy edged when attempting to drive, Ben Stokes perished foolishly chasing a wider delivery and Jos Buttler brought about his own demise by tamely chipping to short cover.

"They're all great one-day cricketers, some are great Test cricketers, so I think they love to feel bat on ball, especially through that middle order," Hazlewood added.

"So if we can dry up the runs and force a mistake, which we saw a couple today, then that's fantastic."

Given Australia made only 179 first time around, and arrived at a venue bathed in glorious sunshine on Friday, it was a day few expected.

"I can't remember a day like this, to be honest. It's been fantastic," Hazlewood admitted.

"Sixty is hard work to come back from during a Test. I don't think many teams are winning if one of their innings is 60 or 70 runs, it makes it difficult.

"I think if we start well again [in England's] next innings, they might think, 'Here we go again', so it's about creating that doubt in the mind."

Australia sought to hammer home their advantage in the third Test on Friday after England were skittled for 67 to leave their hopes of retaining the urn virtually extinguished.

England arrived at Headingley hoping to make hay in the sunshine but their latest batting collapse inside 28 overs left them with a 112-run first-innings deficit, with the tourists reaching tea at 82-3 and extending their lead to 194.

Joe Root's team had been 54-6 at lunch and lost their remaining four wickets within 23 balls of the second session in posting their lowest ever total at Headingley, and their lowest in the Ashes in 71 years, as Josh Hazlewood returned 5-30.

Wickets continued to fall during Australia's second innings but England's flagging attack were only able to do so much as Marnus Labuschagne (13 not out) and Travis Head (17 not out) came off with a insurmountable target firmly in their sights.

Having entered lunch in such a perilous position, England's tail was unable to wag and Chris Woakes, Jos Buttler, Jofra Archer and Jack Leach all departed for single figures to leave Joe Denly's 12 as the top score in a woeful total.

It was the fourth time since the start of 2018 that England were dismissed for 85 or less, though the mood briefly changed when Australia opener David Warner was struck on the pads by Stuart Broad to depart without score.

Marcus Harris (19) continued the head-scratching approach to batting when clean bowled attempting to drive Jack Leach's first delivery.

Usman Khawaja (23) had no control over a shot to Woakes that was caught by Jason Roy in the slips, but Labuschange and Head reached tea without too much trouble and Australia firmly on top.

England were embarrassed at home by their arch rivals on Friday as Australia ran through their fragile batting line-up in dismissing them for 67.

Tim Paine's team seized the initiative in the third Test by skittling their hosts out inside 28 overs, raising the possibility of Australia retaining the urn and avoiding defeat in an away Ashes series for the first time since 2001.

It was a display that was not just horrifically bad, but historically bad.

With the help of Opta, we take a look at the numbers behind the horror show at Headingley.

 

- England's eventual total of 67 was their lowest ever at Headingley, where the lowest Test total of all time is 61 (West Indies in 2000).

- This capitulation followed England being dismissed for 85 by Ireland at Lord's last month. This is just the second time where England were all out for fewer than 100 twice in home Tests hosted in the same year (2019 and 1888).

- Moreover, this was the fourth time since the start of 2018 that England were all out for 85 or less. Their other paltry totals came against West Indies in January (77) and against New Zealand in March 2018 (58).

- This was England's lowest total against Australia since 1948 and their fourth lowest in a home Ashes Test.

- Having gone for a golden duck at Lord's last time out, England captain Joe Root was dismissed without score again. It is the first time in his Test career Root was out for back-to-back ducks.

- Positioned at first slip, David Warner claimed four catches - the joint-most by a fielder in an Ashes Test innings.

England are facing up to the possibility of failing to win a home Ashes series for the first time since 2001 after an embarrassing display on Friday saw them dismissed for 67 in Leeds.

Joe Root's team were skittled inside 28 overs on day two for their lowest Test total at Headingley, and their lowest against Australia since 1948, to leave them with a first-innings deficit of 112.

With Australia needing to win only one of the remaining three Tests to retain the urn, England face a mammoth task to save the series, despite dismissing the tourists for 179 on Thursday.

Glorious batting conditions greeted Rory Burns and Jason Roy when they arrived at the crease on Friday, but it was Josh Hazlewood (5-30) who shone in the sun instead.

David Warner took four catches at first slip, including ones from Roy - out driving outside off - and Root, who made back-to-back ducks for the first time in his Test career, raising further debate about his position at number three.

Burns gloved a short delivery from Pat Cummins (3-23) behind before Ben Stokes foolishly went chasing a wide one from James Pattinson (2-9), who also accounted for Joe Denly - his 12 proving to be the only double-figures score of a dismal innings.

Jonny Bairstow perished when dangling his bat outside off to leave England 54-6 at lunch, and their misery was soon complete as they lost their final four wickets in 23 balls upon the resumption.

Chris Woakes, Jos Buttler, Jofra Archer and Jack Leach were the men to go, Hazlewood bowling the latter to give him a five-for and Australia the upper hand.

Warner was unable to match his slip-catching exploits with the bat as went for a duck, falling to Stuart Broad once again, before the visitors progressed to 26-1 – a lead of 138.

Josh Hazlewood and his fellow seamers tore through England's fragile batting line-up on the second day of the third Test to leave Australia in a commanding position at lunch.

The hosts were 54-6 at Headingley - still 125 runs in arrears - as a combination of disciplined bowling from Hazlewood (3-26), and dismal shot-selection from England's batsmen left Joe Root's team firmly up against it.

In stark contrast to Thursday's gloomy weather, when Australia were all out for 179, England's innings began in glorious conditions for batting, not that they could take advantage.

The latest ill-advised drive from Jason Roy (9) to Hazlewood saw him pick out first slip David Warner, who then took a sharp chance from Root off the same bowler as England's captain made back-to-back ducks for the first time in his Test career.

Joe Denly was given a DRS reprieve when initially adjudged lbw four balls later, though England were soon 20-3 when Rory Burns (9) gloved a shorter delivery from Pat Cummins behind.

Ben Stokes (8) was guilty of the most head-scratching stroke of all, chasing a wide delivery from James Pattinson he could barely reach and giving Warner more cause for celebration.

Denly took 49 balls to make 12 but his race was run when his eyes lit up to width offered by Pattinson – wicketkeeper Tim Paine again taking the catch - and Hazlewood's persistent line and length lured Jonny Bairstow (4) into a tentative prod that Warner snaffled for his fourth catch of the day.

With Australia 1-0 up in the best-of-five series and knowing victory in Leeds would see them retain the urn, England were in desperate need of a productive partnership from Jos Buttler and Chris Woakes in the second session. 

England suffered more top-order woe in the third Ashes Test as Jason Roy, Joe Root and Rory Burns were removed inside the opening hour of Friday's play.

After Australia were dismissed for 179 under gloomy skies at Headingley on Thursday, England started their innings on Friday in far more favourable batting conditions, but Roy (9) failed to take advantage as he loosely drove at a delivery outside off from Josh Hazlewood and gave David Warner a low catch at first slip.

That brought Root to the crease at his home ground but the England captain, moved up to three prior to this series in a bid to remedy his team's batting frailties, lasted only two balls and fell for a second successive duck for the first time in his Test career.

Once again it was Hazlewood who struck with a delivery that squared up Root and found his edge, Warner's brilliant take at slip leaving England 10-2 after 5.1 overs.

Australia thought they had their hosts three down inside the opening 30 minutes when, after a long period of deliberation, umpire Joel Wilson raised his finger to give Joe Denly out lbw to Hazlewood four balls after Root's dismissal.

Denly - yet to get off the mark at that point - rightly reviewed as the ball was going over his stumps, but the third wicket soon came as Burns (9) looked to hook a shorter delivery from Pat Cummins and gloved it through to Tim Paine behind the stumps, leaving England in all sorts of trouble at 20-3.

Captain Joe Root says England must "jump on" the opportunity created by Steve Smith's absence for Australia in the third Ashes Test.

Smith was inspirational in securing a 1-0 lead for Australia after two matches, but he will be missing from the third fixture at Headingley due to a concussion after taking a Jofra Archer bouncer to the neck last time out at Lord's.

Archer was instrumental in England coming back into the series in the match, although the hosts ultimately settled for a draw.

Root wants to see Archer impress again as he compared Smith's absence to when England's all-time leading Test wicket-taker James Anderson hobbled out of the series opener.

"When you're playing someone of his quality, you're looking for a number of different ways to get him out," Root said of Archer's approach to trying to dismiss Smith.

"I felt the way that Jofra bowled in that spell made for great cricket. It's great to be on the field to be a part of that. We felt like we were creating chances all the time.

"But you never want to see someone go off injured like that, you never want to see someone be walked off the field and for him to miss this game.

"There was a lot of concern in our dressing room for his health. It's great to see that he's actually up and about and he's fine and looks as though he's happy within himself.

"It's very unfortunate on their part. We had the challenge of Jimmy [Anderson] going down four overs into a Test match and had to manage that without a replacement.

"You get these swings within a big series like this, every now and again, and when you get your opportunity, you've got to jump on it.

"They'll be huge shoes to fill for whoever comes in for him in Australia's batting line-up and we've got to make sure that we keep trying to exploit these techniques on these wickets."

Asked if Australia, led by Pat Cummins, might match Archer's aggressive assault on batsmen, Root replied: "We'll see. Those are things you have to manage within the game.

"I feel like the guys know what type of bowling [Cummins] is capable of doing. We've seen him do that before in Test cricket. It's just about managing the situation when you face it.

"If he does go to that and the conditions suit pitching it up and swinging it, and it plays into our favour, we'll have to wait and see."

England have had their own concussion issue to deal with this week, with Jason Roy set for a final assessment on Thursday after passing an initial examination.

Ollie Pope has been called in as cover and would likely come in at number four, with Joe Denly moving up to replace opener Roy.

Root would not confirm the England XI regardless of Roy's fitness, as Sam Curran remains in contention after again being included in a 12-man squad.

Jofra Archer has shaken up the Ashes after living up to the hype on his Test debut, according to England captain Joe Root.

An intriguing finish to the second Test at Lord's was in store when England declared on 258-5 in the second session, setting Australia 267 to win or bat out the final 48 overs for a draw on Sunday.

It was the latter scenario which came to fruition as the tourists, missing Steve Smith because of the concussion he suffered following an Archer bouncer, batted out for a draw, meaning Tim Paine's side retained a 1-0 lead in the series.

However, in Archer – who returned match figures of 5-91 from a heavy workload of 44 overs – England have fresh optimism heading into the third Test at Headingley, with Smith's availability for an encounter that begins on Thursday in "serious doubt".

"He's come in and he really has made a massive impact, added a different dynamic to our bowling group," Root said at a news conference.

"I think [he] has given Australia something different to think about so it's really pleasing to see someone come in on Test debut and really shake up things and live up to the hype, even some of the hype that he put on himself.

"It's really pleasing to see and it makes for a very interesting last three games."

It was one of Archer's rockets that clattered into Smith's neck and knocked Australia's talisman down on Saturday.

Though Smith returned to complete his innings later that day, Australia announced on Sunday that he would play no further part at Lord's having shown concussion symptoms when he woke up.

Smith's concussion replacement in their XI, Marnus Labuschagne, then copped another vicious delivery on the helmet grille from Archer, who had sent back David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs.

Labuschagne survived that onslaught and went on to make a crucial 59, but Root feels Barbados-born seamer Archer can be instrumental as his side seek to retain the urn.

"He makes things happen when not many others in world cricket can," Root added.

"He's got such a unique action and way of bowling and natural pace which is always going to be in the game on any surface. When you've got that and the skill of the other guys around it, it makes for a tasty combination.

"It will make them think about what way they're going to combat how he's going to come at them.

"It's always nice when you're stood at slip and not batting against him. It's very different to the other options that we've had previously and have in this team, it's a different skill."

Australia captain Tim Paine lauded Marnus Labuschagne's commitment to the Ashes cause as Steve Smith's concussion replacement produced a gritty half-century in his side's draw with England.

Paine's team were set 267 to win inside 48 overs on the final day at Lord's after the hosts declared on 258-5 following a century from Ben Stokes (115 not out).

However, they were more concerned with batting out the day when Jofra Archer swiftly removed David Warner and Usman Khawaja to bring Labuschagne to the crease.

The 25-year-old was only thrust into the action as the first concussion substitute in Test history after Smith withdrew having been struck on the neck on Saturday by a bouncer from Archer, who then delivered a 91.6 miles-per-hour rocket that flew into Labuschagne's helmet grille and knocked him to the ground.

After receiving treatment on the field, Labuschagne went on to make a valuable 59, sharing an 85-run stand with Travis Head (42 not out) that took the game beyond England's reach – Australia eventually finishing with 154-6 to retain their 1-0 series lead.

"[It was] really pleasing for us to see him do that, particularly after the second ball he copped," Paine, speaking to Sky Sports, said of Labuschagne. 

"To get 150 kilometres per hour in the face and be able to stand up and play the way he did, for such a young player in Test cricket, was fantastic. Travis Head was the same."

Smith had returned to bat on Saturday following assessment from Australia's medical staff, yet it was confirmed on the final day that he would play no further part in the Test having displayed concussion symptoms in the morning.

Australia have said it is unlikely that their talismanic batsman will feature in the third Test, which begins at Headingley on Thursday.

"He's okay," Paine revealed.

"Obviously it was a really nasty knock. He felt okay yesterday and then, as concussions tend to be, [the symptoms were] delayed. He woke up, not feeling at his best today, so the decision was made to leave him out."

Asked whether he was happy that Smith was able to return on Saturday, Paine added: "I'm no doctor but we've got some professionals behind the scenes that make those decisions.

"Steve passed all his tests [on Saturday], was feeling okay. He deteriorated a little bit overnight, he retested, they weren't as good this morning so the medical professionals made that call.

"He will need to improve [to play at Headingley], there's no doubt about that, but hopefully for our sake he does improve in the next few days."

Tim Paine has explained the decision to rest James Pattinson for the second Ashes Test is to look after the Australia paceman's long-term prospects.

Pattinson contributed to a 251-run win over England at Edgbaston in the series opener, but he was left out of a 12-man squad on Tuesday for the second contest at Lord's.

However, given Pattinson's past injury problems - his appearance in the opening Test was his first in five-ball cricket since February 2016 - Paine insists Australia were not willing to take a risk.

The tourists' captain told the media Pattinson was always likely to have to miss a match at some stage and the opportunity to bring in either Mitchell Starc or Josh Hazlewood made the decision easier.

"We have two world-class bowlers on the sidelines and we want to make sure that James is absolutely cherry ripe every time he plays," Paine told a news conference.

"He's available for selection, but we've decided to rest him for this game to make sure that his long-term future is in really good shape.

"It was always going to be one way or the other. He would either miss this Test and be fresher for the third Test, or he has this one after the long break and doesn't play the third.

"I think if you look at Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood's records at Lord's, that's a good venue for one of them to come in and play and be confident in the fact that they can bowl really well here."

Given Australia's strength in depth, England captain Joe Root expected such a call was likely to be made at some point.

"I was and I wasn't [surprised]," he said. "With the squad of bowlers they have, over the course of a five-match series, they are going to chop and change things over, try to find different formulas for different surfaces and conditions.

"I'm not surprised they've gone with those two added to the squad."

Joe Root is excited by the prospect of seeing Jofra Archer begin his England Test career against Australia in the second Ashes Test.

Archer has been named in a 12-man England squad ahead of the clash at Lord's, having missed the opener in which the hosts were thrashed by 251 runs.

There is huge attention on Archer as he prepares to make his bow, with the electric paceman set to replace the injured James Anderson, yet Root does not see the pressure getting to his young star.

The supremely confident Sussex bowler has not played a first-class match since last September but is being backed to deliver.

"He's very confident - as he should be," Root told a news conference. "As he's made very clear, it's his preferred format with the red ball. I'm very excited to see him at the beginning of a journey.

"As I've said, he's a very confident young guy and things like that [his first-class lay-off] don't seem to phase him.

"I think he's proven that throughout the World Cup, coming in and dealing with that right at the last minute, and all the pressures that held. He doesn't want to shy away from stuff like that.

"If anything, I think it'll motivate him. When he gets his chance, he'll be desperate to prove to everyone how good he is, as he says he is."

Asked if Archer could be the decisive factor in the series, Root replied: "We'll have to wait and see. If you ask him, he'll definitely say yes.

"But that's what you want - young guys coming in, full of confidence and belief in their own ability. He's someone who definitely won't shy away from any challenge.

"It's great to have someone like that in the dressing room. He feeds off the rest of the guys as well. It's a great position for him to start in."

However, Australia captain Tim Paine is hoping Archer's past performances in the Big Bash League have prepared the tourists for this week's Test.

"That's Test cricket. A lot of our guys have seen Jofra or faced him, which is a plus," he said. "Obviously it's been in white-ball cricket, but we've actually faced him in Australia, where conditions really suit fast bowling.

"I think we've seen him at his fastest, guys know what to expect, they know how skillful he is and how good he is.

"Like most bowlers that play Test cricket, there are going to be times where he's going to be a real threat and we have to weather that.

"[The focus on Archer] doesn't bother us, to be honest. We're focused on what we have to do - not the expectation around Jofra and whether he can handle that or not.

"I don't know. I don't think he'll worry, from what I know of him. I think it's exciting. It adds to the Test match and adds to the atmosphere."

Moeen Ali was left out of the England squad for the second Ashes Test against Australia and is now "recharging" rather than immediately returning to action with Worcestershire.

However, captain Joe Root insists the all-rounder will be back in an England shirt soon enough.

Moeen endured a tough start to the Ashes series as he took three wickets for 172 runs while scoring just four with the bat in a 251-run England defeat at Edgbaston.

And just as at the Cricket World Cup, where Moeen missed the final four matches – all wins – in England's triumph, he has been dropped from the team.

Rather than return to play for his county, though, Worcestershire confirmed on Tuesday that Moeen will first take some time out.

The county side's coach Alex Gidman said: "Mo is spending a little time away from the middle, recharging his batteries and putting in some quality practice time, which he feels he needs and we completely respect.

"He has had an intense schedule of international cricket involving the ICC World Cup and the start of the Ashes.

"Mo loves playing for Worcestershire and he gives a lift to everyone in the dressing room when he comes back and plays for us.

"We saw at Trent Bridge [in the Vitality Blast win over Notts Outlaws last month] what he gives to us and we look forward to when he returns soon."

England skipper Root added in a news conference: "I spent a good while chatting to Mo, making sure he understood where we're at in terms of getting him back to his best.

"[England want him to] go and play some county cricket and performing well for Worcester, as he proved last time around, coming into the India series and having a massive influence on it.

"There's no reason why he can't do the same again and force his way back into the squad. He's been a big part of English cricket. He's done some fantastic things in a Test shirt and it's certainly not the last we'll see of him.

"He's a fine cricketer, he's a great man and he gives so much to this team. I'm sure it won't be long before you see him back involved."

Joe Root vowed not to make any "shotgun" decisions over team selection for the second Ashes Test after England were humbled by Australia in the Edgbaston opener.

England had Australia 122-8 in the first innings and took a 90-run lead into the second but, thanks largely to back-to-back centuries from Steve Smith, eventually slipped to a 251-run defeat.

Several players therefore find their place in the team at Lord's under threat, with Moeen Ali in particular coming in for criticism after making scores of 0 and 4 with the bat and match figures of 3-172 with the ball.

The decision to play James Anderson has also been scrutinised, with England's record wicket-taker suffering a calf injury on the opening morning having suffered from a similar issue prior to the Test.

Likely replacement Jofra Archer has been struggling with a side strain and will need to prove his fitness in the interim period.

But captain Root insists due diligence will be given in regards team selection.

"We have to go about it [deciding if Archer plays] in a very calculated manner as we did with Jimmy," he said. 

"If someone is fit to play and it's a unanimous decision then you have to put trust in that because it's a recurring – well not a recurring injury – but because it's the same area in general, if you like, it's easy to say or ask questions about the process and decision-making going into it. 

"With Jofra it's a slightly different situation where he'll have played a lot more cricket in between and we'll have a clearer indication of where he's at, turn up at Lord's and make sure there are no shotgun decisions.

"It's very easy to make emotional decisions right now. We're in a lucky position that there's time between the two Test matches. We've got to make sure we're taking all the information very clear about how we want to approach the next game and take a call from there."

On Moeen's place in the team, Root added: "I think with Mo you have to remember how threatening he can be and what an asset to this team he has been in the past. 

"When he's been written off before he comes back stronger, particularly in English conditions. He'll be disappointed with how yesterday went and how the game has gone but he'll dust himself off and come back.

"As I said we've got to make sure we're clear on how we approach the next game and not make too many emotional decisions going into Lord's and sit down as a selection panel and go from there."

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