Captain Joe Root says England must "jump on" the opportunity created by Steve Smith's absence for Australia in the third Ashes Test.

Smith was inspirational in securing a 1-0 lead for Australia after two matches, but he will be missing from the third fixture at Headingley due to a concussion after taking a Jofra Archer bouncer to the neck last time out at Lord's.

Archer was instrumental in England coming back into the series in the match, although the hosts ultimately settled for a draw.

Root wants to see Archer impress again as he compared Smith's absence to when England's all-time leading Test wicket-taker James Anderson hobbled out of the series opener.

"When you're playing someone of his quality, you're looking for a number of different ways to get him out," Root said of Archer's approach to trying to dismiss Smith.

"I felt the way that Jofra bowled in that spell made for great cricket. It's great to be on the field to be a part of that. We felt like we were creating chances all the time.

"But you never want to see someone go off injured like that, you never want to see someone be walked off the field and for him to miss this game.

"There was a lot of concern in our dressing room for his health. It's great to see that he's actually up and about and he's fine and looks as though he's happy within himself.

"It's very unfortunate on their part. We had the challenge of Jimmy [Anderson] going down four overs into a Test match and had to manage that without a replacement.

"You get these swings within a big series like this, every now and again, and when you get your opportunity, you've got to jump on it.

"They'll be huge shoes to fill for whoever comes in for him in Australia's batting line-up and we've got to make sure that we keep trying to exploit these techniques on these wickets."

Asked if Australia, led by Pat Cummins, might match Archer's aggressive assault on batsmen, Root replied: "We'll see. Those are things you have to manage within the game.

"I feel like the guys know what type of bowling [Cummins] is capable of doing. We've seen him do that before in Test cricket. It's just about managing the situation when you face it.

"If he does go to that and the conditions suit pitching it up and swinging it, and it plays into our favour, we'll have to wait and see."

England have had their own concussion issue to deal with this week, with Jason Roy set for a final assessment on Thursday after passing an initial examination.

Ollie Pope has been called in as cover and would likely come in at number four, with Joe Denly moving up to replace opener Roy.

Root would not confirm the England XI regardless of Roy's fitness, as Sam Curran remains in contention after again being included in a 12-man squad.

Jofra Archer has shaken up the Ashes after living up to the hype on his Test debut, according to England captain Joe Root.

An intriguing finish to the second Test at Lord's was in store when England declared on 258-5 in the second session, setting Australia 267 to win or bat out the final 48 overs for a draw on Sunday.

It was the latter scenario which came to fruition as the tourists, missing Steve Smith because of the concussion he suffered following an Archer bouncer, batted out for a draw, meaning Tim Paine's side retained a 1-0 lead in the series.

However, in Archer – who returned match figures of 5-91 from a heavy workload of 44 overs – England have fresh optimism heading into the third Test at Headingley, with Smith's availability for an encounter that begins on Thursday in "serious doubt".

"He's come in and he really has made a massive impact, added a different dynamic to our bowling group," Root said at a news conference.

"I think [he] has given Australia something different to think about so it's really pleasing to see someone come in on Test debut and really shake up things and live up to the hype, even some of the hype that he put on himself.

"It's really pleasing to see and it makes for a very interesting last three games."

It was one of Archer's rockets that clattered into Smith's neck and knocked Australia's talisman down on Saturday.

Though Smith returned to complete his innings later that day, Australia announced on Sunday that he would play no further part at Lord's having shown concussion symptoms when he woke up.

Smith's concussion replacement in their XI, Marnus Labuschagne, then copped another vicious delivery on the helmet grille from Archer, who had sent back David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs.

Labuschagne survived that onslaught and went on to make a crucial 59, but Root feels Barbados-born seamer Archer can be instrumental as his side seek to retain the urn.

"He makes things happen when not many others in world cricket can," Root added.

"He's got such a unique action and way of bowling and natural pace which is always going to be in the game on any surface. When you've got that and the skill of the other guys around it, it makes for a tasty combination.

"It will make them think about what way they're going to combat how he's going to come at them.

"It's always nice when you're stood at slip and not batting against him. It's very different to the other options that we've had previously and have in this team, it's a different skill."

Australia captain Tim Paine lauded Marnus Labuschagne's commitment to the Ashes cause as Steve Smith's concussion replacement produced a gritty half-century in his side's draw with England.

Paine's team were set 267 to win inside 48 overs on the final day at Lord's after the hosts declared on 258-5 following a century from Ben Stokes (115 not out).

However, they were more concerned with batting out the day when Jofra Archer swiftly removed David Warner and Usman Khawaja to bring Labuschagne to the crease.

The 25-year-old was only thrust into the action as the first concussion substitute in Test history after Smith withdrew having been struck on the neck on Saturday by a bouncer from Archer, who then delivered a 91.6 miles-per-hour rocket that flew into Labuschagne's helmet grille and knocked him to the ground.

After receiving treatment on the field, Labuschagne went on to make a valuable 59, sharing an 85-run stand with Travis Head (42 not out) that took the game beyond England's reach – Australia eventually finishing with 154-6 to retain their 1-0 series lead.

"[It was] really pleasing for us to see him do that, particularly after the second ball he copped," Paine, speaking to Sky Sports, said of Labuschagne. 

"To get 150 kilometres per hour in the face and be able to stand up and play the way he did, for such a young player in Test cricket, was fantastic. Travis Head was the same."

Smith had returned to bat on Saturday following assessment from Australia's medical staff, yet it was confirmed on the final day that he would play no further part in the Test having displayed concussion symptoms in the morning.

Australia have said it is unlikely that their talismanic batsman will feature in the third Test, which begins at Headingley on Thursday.

"He's okay," Paine revealed.

"Obviously it was a really nasty knock. He felt okay yesterday and then, as concussions tend to be, [the symptoms were] delayed. He woke up, not feeling at his best today, so the decision was made to leave him out."

Asked whether he was happy that Smith was able to return on Saturday, Paine added: "I'm no doctor but we've got some professionals behind the scenes that make those decisions.

"Steve passed all his tests [on Saturday], was feeling okay. He deteriorated a little bit overnight, he retested, they weren't as good this morning so the medical professionals made that call.

"He will need to improve [to play at Headingley], there's no doubt about that, but hopefully for our sake he does improve in the next few days."

Tim Paine has explained the decision to rest James Pattinson for the second Ashes Test is to look after the Australia paceman's long-term prospects.

Pattinson contributed to a 251-run win over England at Edgbaston in the series opener, but he was left out of a 12-man squad on Tuesday for the second contest at Lord's.

However, given Pattinson's past injury problems - his appearance in the opening Test was his first in five-ball cricket since February 2016 - Paine insists Australia were not willing to take a risk.

The tourists' captain told the media Pattinson was always likely to have to miss a match at some stage and the opportunity to bring in either Mitchell Starc or Josh Hazlewood made the decision easier.

"We have two world-class bowlers on the sidelines and we want to make sure that James is absolutely cherry ripe every time he plays," Paine told a news conference.

"He's available for selection, but we've decided to rest him for this game to make sure that his long-term future is in really good shape.

"It was always going to be one way or the other. He would either miss this Test and be fresher for the third Test, or he has this one after the long break and doesn't play the third.

"I think if you look at Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood's records at Lord's, that's a good venue for one of them to come in and play and be confident in the fact that they can bowl really well here."

Given Australia's strength in depth, England captain Joe Root expected such a call was likely to be made at some point.

"I was and I wasn't [surprised]," he said. "With the squad of bowlers they have, over the course of a five-match series, they are going to chop and change things over, try to find different formulas for different surfaces and conditions.

"I'm not surprised they've gone with those two added to the squad."

Joe Root is excited by the prospect of seeing Jofra Archer begin his England Test career against Australia in the second Ashes Test.

Archer has been named in a 12-man England squad ahead of the clash at Lord's, having missed the opener in which the hosts were thrashed by 251 runs.

There is huge attention on Archer as he prepares to make his bow, with the electric paceman set to replace the injured James Anderson, yet Root does not see the pressure getting to his young star.

The supremely confident Sussex bowler has not played a first-class match since last September but is being backed to deliver.

"He's very confident - as he should be," Root told a news conference. "As he's made very clear, it's his preferred format with the red ball. I'm very excited to see him at the beginning of a journey.

"As I've said, he's a very confident young guy and things like that [his first-class lay-off] don't seem to phase him.

"I think he's proven that throughout the World Cup, coming in and dealing with that right at the last minute, and all the pressures that held. He doesn't want to shy away from stuff like that.

"If anything, I think it'll motivate him. When he gets his chance, he'll be desperate to prove to everyone how good he is, as he says he is."

Asked if Archer could be the decisive factor in the series, Root replied: "We'll have to wait and see. If you ask him, he'll definitely say yes.

"But that's what you want - young guys coming in, full of confidence and belief in their own ability. He's someone who definitely won't shy away from any challenge.

"It's great to have someone like that in the dressing room. He feeds off the rest of the guys as well. It's a great position for him to start in."

However, Australia captain Tim Paine is hoping Archer's past performances in the Big Bash League have prepared the tourists for this week's Test.

"That's Test cricket. A lot of our guys have seen Jofra or faced him, which is a plus," he said. "Obviously it's been in white-ball cricket, but we've actually faced him in Australia, where conditions really suit fast bowling.

"I think we've seen him at his fastest, guys know what to expect, they know how skillful he is and how good he is.

"Like most bowlers that play Test cricket, there are going to be times where he's going to be a real threat and we have to weather that.

"[The focus on Archer] doesn't bother us, to be honest. We're focused on what we have to do - not the expectation around Jofra and whether he can handle that or not.

"I don't know. I don't think he'll worry, from what I know of him. I think it's exciting. It adds to the Test match and adds to the atmosphere."

Moeen Ali was left out of the England squad for the second Ashes Test against Australia and is now "recharging" rather than immediately returning to action with Worcestershire.

However, captain Joe Root insists the all-rounder will be back in an England shirt soon enough.

Moeen endured a tough start to the Ashes series as he took three wickets for 172 runs while scoring just four with the bat in a 251-run England defeat at Edgbaston.

And just as at the Cricket World Cup, where Moeen missed the final four matches – all wins – in England's triumph, he has been dropped from the team.

Rather than return to play for his county, though, Worcestershire confirmed on Tuesday that Moeen will first take some time out.

The county side's coach Alex Gidman said: "Mo is spending a little time away from the middle, recharging his batteries and putting in some quality practice time, which he feels he needs and we completely respect.

"He has had an intense schedule of international cricket involving the ICC World Cup and the start of the Ashes.

"Mo loves playing for Worcestershire and he gives a lift to everyone in the dressing room when he comes back and plays for us.

"We saw at Trent Bridge [in the Vitality Blast win over Notts Outlaws last month] what he gives to us and we look forward to when he returns soon."

England skipper Root added in a news conference: "I spent a good while chatting to Mo, making sure he understood where we're at in terms of getting him back to his best.

"[England want him to] go and play some county cricket and performing well for Worcester, as he proved last time around, coming into the India series and having a massive influence on it.

"There's no reason why he can't do the same again and force his way back into the squad. He's been a big part of English cricket. He's done some fantastic things in a Test shirt and it's certainly not the last we'll see of him.

"He's a fine cricketer, he's a great man and he gives so much to this team. I'm sure it won't be long before you see him back involved."

Joe Root vowed not to make any "shotgun" decisions over team selection for the second Ashes Test after England were humbled by Australia in the Edgbaston opener.

England had Australia 122-8 in the first innings and took a 90-run lead into the second but, thanks largely to back-to-back centuries from Steve Smith, eventually slipped to a 251-run defeat.

Several players therefore find their place in the team at Lord's under threat, with Moeen Ali in particular coming in for criticism after making scores of 0 and 4 with the bat and match figures of 3-172 with the ball.

The decision to play James Anderson has also been scrutinised, with England's record wicket-taker suffering a calf injury on the opening morning having suffered from a similar issue prior to the Test.

Likely replacement Jofra Archer has been struggling with a side strain and will need to prove his fitness in the interim period.

But captain Root insists due diligence will be given in regards team selection.

"We have to go about it [deciding if Archer plays] in a very calculated manner as we did with Jimmy," he said. 

"If someone is fit to play and it's a unanimous decision then you have to put trust in that because it's a recurring – well not a recurring injury – but because it's the same area in general, if you like, it's easy to say or ask questions about the process and decision-making going into it. 

"With Jofra it's a slightly different situation where he'll have played a lot more cricket in between and we'll have a clearer indication of where he's at, turn up at Lord's and make sure there are no shotgun decisions.

"It's very easy to make emotional decisions right now. We're in a lucky position that there's time between the two Test matches. We've got to make sure we're taking all the information very clear about how we want to approach the next game and take a call from there."

On Moeen's place in the team, Root added: "I think with Mo you have to remember how threatening he can be and what an asset to this team he has been in the past. 

"When he's been written off before he comes back stronger, particularly in English conditions. He'll be disappointed with how yesterday went and how the game has gone but he'll dust himself off and come back.

"As I said we've got to make sure we're clear on how we approach the next game and not make too many emotional decisions going into Lord's and sit down as a selection panel and go from there."

Australia's 251-run victory in the first Ashes Test raised many intriguing questions.

Will an injured James Anderson feature again during the series? Should an out-of-form Moeen Ali retain his place? Is there any way to get Steve Smith out - and will the tourists change a winning XI?

It is not just the players who are in the spotlight, however. The umpires' performances are also closely scrutinised - and it was a tough outing for on-field duo Aleem Dar and Joel Wilson in Birmingham.

There were more reviews than at a book club meeting. The two men in the middle had a rocky start to proceedings on the opening day, with the use of technology highlighting seven errors.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has already announced the list of officials who will stand throughout the series, with Dar on duty at Lord's next and Wilson back for the third Test, which takes place at Headingley. For both fixtures, the duo will be working in conjunction with Chris Gaffaney, who was busy in his role as third umpire for the opening game.

Following the game, we look back at the long list of successful reviews at Edgbaston.

 

DAY ONE

1.1 overs: David Warner is given not out by Dar despite getting a thin edge down the leg side from Stuart Broad. In fairness to Dar, wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow was the only England player to appeal with any gusto.

14.2 overs: Umpire Wilson turns down a vociferous appeal after England think they have Usman Khawaja caught behind off Chris Woakes. On this occasion, the hosts' review is successful as UltraEdge picks up the finest of edges from Australia's number three.

33.5 overs: England are joyous as Smith pads up to a Broad delivery and Dar raises the finger. The batsman reviews almost immediately and his decision is justified, with HawkEye showing the ball missing off stump.

34.6 overs: Wilson turns down an lbw appeal from Woakes against Matthew Wade. England review and another on-field decision is overturned.

39.6 overs: Dar decides James Pattinson is lbw to Broad. The batsman opts against a review, perhaps due to the presence of key man Smith at the other end, but replays again show the ball would have missed leg stump.

46.1 overs: Peter Siddle is lbw to Woakes, according to Wilson. A review proves the umpire wrong as a massive inside edge is revealed.

DAY TWO

20.6 overs: Australia thought they had England captain Root caught behind off the bowling of Pattinson for nine. Wilson agreed with their vehement appeal, but replays showed the only piece of wood the ball had clipped was off stump, with somehow the bail remaining in place. 

33.2 overs: Root again, this time on 14. The right-hander was given out lbw by Dar, Siddle the bowler as the ball cut back in. However, it had also taken a sizeable deflection off the bat, giving the skipper a reprieve. He went on to make 57 in England's total of 374.

DAY THREE

2.6 overs: For the second time in the match, England needed the help of DRS to dismiss Warner. The opener was unable to withdraw his bat in time from a Broad delivery from around the wicket, leading to an edge through to wicketkeeper Bairstow. Wilson was not convinced (and neither was Broad initially) but UltraEdge quickly showed up the contact.

DAY FOUR

84.2 overs: Broad felt he had Wade lbw after England had taken the second new ball - and Wilson originally agreed. However, he was forced to reverse his initial call as the ball was shown to be going over the top.

DAY FIVE

12.6 overs: Wilson must have been a little worried when Root immediately reviewed an lbw call, despite there clearly being no bat involved. Indeed, the footage revealed why - the delivery from Pattinson was missing leg stump...and by some distance, too.

16.4 overs: The same umpire-batsman combination were involved again in the morning session, this time Wilson's finger going up when Root was struck on the pad by Siddle. The batsman had a smile on his face as he quickly made a 'T' signal with his arms, knowing very well that an initial edge would save him.

Joe Root refused to blame a Cricket World Cup hangover for England's disappointing defeat in the first Ashes Test against Australia.

The opening day at Edgbaston came just 18 days after an amazing Lord's final against New Zealand, as England became world champions following a dramatic Super Over.

Six members of that ODI side featured in Birmingham, although their stand-out performers against Australia, Stuart Broad – who took 5-86 in the first innings – and centurion Rory Burns, were not among them.

Root, however, instead blamed an inability to capitalise on an early position of strength, having reduced Australia to 122-8 in their first innings, for England's 251-run defeat.

"No, I think that [World Cup fatigue] is a bit of an excuse if I'm being honest," he said at the post-match presentation. 

"As I said we played some good stuff throughout the game, we just didn't do it for long enough and we didn't take our chance right at the start of the game when we had them in that position."

The returning Steve Smith proved the difference by becoming just the third Australian to make centuries in each innings of an away Ashes Test.

England were also hindered by a calf injury sustained by James Anderson, which Root felt had an influence on the outcome of the Test.

"Yeah it was two brilliant innings [from Steve Smith], we have to keep working hard on getting him out," Root added.

"It was hard losing Jimmy early on, it becomes a balancing act, these things happen in cricket."

Anderson's selection was a dilemma for England before the Test with the seamer having sustained a similar injury last month, but Root defended the decision to select their all-time leading wicket taker.

"It was a group decision in terms of selection, he passed a fitness test [and] it's just one of those freak things that can happen in cricket," Root said.

Australia completed a resounding 251-run victory on day five to seal the opening Ashes Test as Nathan Lyon tormented sorry England with a sublime six-for at Edgbaston.

The heroics of centurions Steve Smith and Matthew Wade a day previous set England a near-impossible 398 target and their only realistic chance of avoiding defeat was to bat out the day for a draw.

But predictions that a wearing day-five pitch would be suited to the spinning skills of Lyon bore fruit and he finished with 6-49, becoming the fourth Australian to rack up 350 Test wickets in the process.

Pat Cummins added 4-32 and now has 100 Test wickets as England played like the proverbial deer in the headlights to fall behind in the five-match series.

The inquest will now begin for England, who had Australia at 122-8 in the first innings before the first of Smith's centuries brought the tourists back into the match.

Even still, England held a 90-run lead heading into the second innings but their inability to remove Smith proved costly in an enthralling contest and the Australians now have the psychological edge with their star batsman in phenomenal form.

Tim Paine's side head to Lord's with a 1-0 lead having ended an 18-year wait for an Edgbaston win in any format, while it marks just England's second defeat in 15 Test matches at the venue.

England would have been relatively content with the opening hour despite the loss of first-innings centurion Rory Burns (11) when a short one from Cummins was gloved to Lyon at gully.

Jason Roy (28) and Joe Root made 41 for the second wicket, only for the former to make a complete hash of attacking a Lyon delivery that turned through the gap.

Lyon quickly added Joe Denly (11), who wastefully reviewed when there was clearly a nick on a looped one to Cameron Bancroft at short leg, and the same combination snared the crucial wicket of Root – who England really needed to bat most of the day – with the fielder snaffling a sharp take.

It left England 85-4 by lunch and the situation did not improve in the afternoon session, Cummins ripping up Jos Buttler's off stump before Jonny Bairstow gloved the same man to the slips.

When Ben Stokes edged Lyon behind to gleeful Australia captain Paine the writing was on the wall.

Chris Woakes tried to delay the inevitable with an enterprising 37, but the out-of-sorts Moeen Ali and Stuart Broad had no answer to Lyon and Cummins accounted for Woakes with a short delivery to bring an end to proceedings.


LYON ROARS INTO ELITE AUSSIE CLUB

Lyon joined an elite club when it comes to Test scalps for Australia - only Shane Warne, Glenn McGrath and Dennis Lillee have also made it to 350.

All the focus pre-match was on the tourists' pace attack and which options they may use to try and cut down England. While the trio selected played their part throughout the Test, it was instead the one frontline spin bowler who was left to take centre stage on a worn surface.


STICK OR TWIST? NEITHER HELP OUT ENGLAND

The home side must be wondering where it all went wrong, having reduced Australia to 122-8 on the opening day. Coming to the ground on Monday, they always faced a tough order to survive and keep the series level heading to Lord's.

Their top-order batsmen attempted different methods to cope with Lyon, though none worked for a sustained period. Roy's adventurous march down the pitch will draw criticism, but even the reliable Root succumbed when choosing the more defensive approach. With issues over the form and fitness of key players, England's selectors have plenty to ponder in the break between games.


MOMENT OF THE DAY

The longevity of Root's innings was always likely to be crucial to England's chances of survival. But the skipper was sent on his way after a fine pouch by Bancroft shortly before lunch. Had Root managed to hold on England may have still maintained some hope of a draw, but Australia's celebrations told a story in itself.


KEY OPTA FACTS:

- Lyon has become only the seventh spinner ever to record 350 Test wickets.
- Cummins has now taken 100 Test wickets (21 matches); no Australian bowler has got there faster since 1937 (Bill O'Reilly - 20).
- No bowler has dismissed Root more often in Tests than Lyon (five).
- Denly has scored more than 23 just once in eight Test innings for England.
- Buttler has failed to score more than five runs in four of his eight Test innings in 2019.

Nathan Lyon struck three times as Australia boosted their chances of victory in the first Ashes Test by reducing England to 85-4 by lunch on day five.

The hosts resumed at Edgbaston on 13-0 chasing an unlikely 398 in the fourth innings, with a more realistic aim being to bat out the day to salvage a draw.

However, their survival hopes were hurt when they lost first-innings centurion Rory Burns for 11, the opener getting into a terrible tangle when trying to deal with a short delivery from Pat Cummins, leading to the ball taking the glove and looping kindly to Lyon at gully.

Captain Joe Root joined Jason Roy (28) and the pair added 41 for the second wicket before the latter perished trying to take the positive approach to Lyon, the ball turning through the gap between bat and pad to hit middle stump after he had given the off-spinner the charge.

Lyon then combined with Cameron Bancroft to dismiss Joe Denly (11) and Root before the interval, both right-handers pouched at short leg following inside edges.

Root had twice used the review system to overturn lbw decisions given by umpire Joel Wilson, though there was no doubt over his dismissal as Bancroft snared a sharp chance straight off the bat to send England's skipper on his way for 28.

Jos Buttler ended the session unbeaten on one with Ben Stokes still yet to get off the mark, the pair facing a monumental task as England aim to avoid falling 1-0 behind in the five-match series.

Rory Burns closed in on a maiden Test century and shared a valuable partnership of 132 with skipper Joe Root as England seized the upper hand on day two of the first Ashes Test at Edgbaston.

England's struggles at the top of the order in recent times have been well documented, but Burns and Root each survived early scares to lay a strong platform for their side, contributing 82 not out and 57 respectively.

Steve Smith's spectacular 144 had lifted Australia from 122-8 to 284 all out on day one. However, the momentum had undoubtedly swung back in England's favour by the time tea was taken on Friday.

Burns, who averaged 22 from seven Tests prior to this match, and Root both enjoyed moments of good fortune prior to lunch. The former should have been given out lbw to Nathan Lyon for 21, with Australia failing to call for a review, while Root survived on nine when a James Pattinson delivery clipped his off stump but did not dislodge a bail.

England's captain - in his first Test since moving back up to number three - also overturned a leg-before decision that had gone in favour of Peter Siddle early in the afternoon, replays showing an inside edge that provided further frustration for Australia.

Although Pattinson impressed in the morning session and had Jason Roy caught at second slip for 10, a pace attack lacking Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood struggled to make much of an impact thereafter.

Siddle took a fine reflex catch off his own bowling to dismiss Root just as the batsman was operating with increasing fluency, but Burns held firm despite some particularly nervy moments against off-spinner Lyon, who extracted plenty of turn.

At tea, Burns was two shy of matching his highest Test score and had Joe Denly (nine not out) for company, with England 114 behind and eyeing a significant first-innings lead.

England only lost one wicket on a tense second morning in the first Ashes Test, but Rory Burns and Joe Root survived major let-offs prior to lunch.

After resuming on 10 without loss in reply to Australia's 284 all out, which owed much to Steve Smith's spectacular 144, the hosts saw Jason Roy depart for 10 but avoided any further setbacks as they battled to 71-1.

Australia could feel somewhat hard done by, however, given Burns should have been adjudged lbw for 22 and England captain Root had a lucky escape on nine when a delivery from James Pattinson clipped his off stump but failed to dislodge a bail.

At the interval, Burns was unbeaten on 41, having played some attractive strokes in an encouraging innings, while the ultra-cautious Root had 11 to his name from 57 balls in his first innings since moving back to number three.

Pattinson, playing his first Test since February 2016 after a horrendous run of injury problems, was comfortably the pick of Australia's pacemen on Friday morning and twice found Roy's edge before having the opener caught by Smith at second slip.

Burns looked far more comfortable than his Surrey team-mate, although his progress was not entirely assured.

The left-hander took a glancing blow to the helmet from Pat Cummins and was then fortunate to survive when an appeal for lbw from Nathan Lyon, who found plenty of early turn, was turned down and Australia failed to call for a review despite Hawk-Eye showing the ball would have crashed into leg stump.

Root was then given out caught behind off the impressive Pattinson, but he reviewed successfully as it became apparent the ball had brushed off stump rather than his bat.

Joe Root baulked at the suggestion he is under less pressure to deliver an Ashes series win because of his part in England's Cricket World Cup victory.

England and Australia resume their famous rivalry at Edgbaston on Thursday, the first of five Tests in a packed seven-week schedule as the hosts aim to build upon their breathless triumph over New Zealand at Lord's with another memorable success in the longest format.

Root was England's leading runs scorer as Eoin Morgan's men lifted the trophy, comfortably dispatching Australia in the semi-finals en route to glory.

But the 28-year-old is captain once again for Test duties, as he was when Australia took back possession of the urn with a 4-0 win on home soil 18 months ago.

"I think if you speak to anyone that's captained England and is on the verge of an Ashes series… to say that it doesn't mean as much as any other event, I don't think any of them would agree. It's huge," Root, who will step up again to the crucial number three position in England's brittle top order, told a pre-match news conference.

"Cricket in this country is at an all-time high and probably has interest it's not had for a long time. We've got an opportunity as a team to make this summer a very memorable one."

It is a joust limited-overs specialist Morgan will watch from afar.

Root spoke warmly of the Irishman's influence on his leadership of the Test team as he seeks to plot a similarly defining triumph.

"I'm sure he's still celebrating somewhere, to be honest," Root grinned. "He's obviously desperate for us to do well.

"He's been great with me in terms of helping me find my feet as a captain and someone I will always will look up to.

"He's a great man and a great leader. He'll be as supportive as anyone watching on from wherever he is – hopefully with a glass of red somewhere."

Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes return to the England side after sitting out last week's topsy-turvy Test win over Ireland – the duo prescribed rest after showing nerves of steel to guide England towards and through the super-over finale versus New Zealand.

"When you look back at that final and everything that it threw at the group who played in it, those are experiences you can hold with you for ever," Root said, acknowledging the lingering benefit such exploits could have over the coming weeks.

"For people like Jos and Ben, who spent a long period out there under pressure, it must make you think differently and it'll be interesting to see that unfold throughout this series.

"It can only be positive to have two senior players perform for a long period of time under the biggest scrutiny and pressure in the white-ball format.

"They've got a chance now to take that into the red-ball stuff and into this series."

England captain Joe Root explained his increasing ease with being the team's leader motivated his decision to move up to number three in the batting order for the Ashes.

Root will come in at first wicket down as England look to wrest control of the urn from rivals Australia over the next seven weeks.

There has long been a clamour for the 28-year-old to take on that high-pressure role, given his status as the most gifted batsman in a team that frequently loses cheap wickets at the top of the order.

Having captained England to a 4-0 defeat in Australia 18 months ago, Root's growing assurance as skipper helped persuade him to take the plunge.

"I think it's important that we spread the experience out. It gives me the opportunity to lead from the front as well," he told a pre-match news conference on the eve of the highly anticipated series opener at Edgbaston.

"I also feel now that I'm in a place where I've got my head around dealing with the captaincy and my batting – being able to separate the two.

"Hopefully it's an opportunity for me to make an impact at the top of the order."

Joe Denly came into the England side as an opener for this year's tour of the West Indies, meaning he will take on his third batting spot of a four-Test career in Birmingham to accommodate Root's elevation.

Jason Roy backed up his blistering World Cup form with a half-century on his debut in the longest format against Ireland at Lord's last week, but Surrey colleague Rory Burns – himself a Test debutant in Sri Lanka last November – has failed to reach 30 in his past six international innings.

As a collective, it does not present the most intimidating prospect to Australia's much-vaunted seam attack, but Root is confident of their prospects and placed an onus on Roy to take the attack to the tourists.

"I think it's a very exciting top order," he said. "I want Jason to go out and play in his own manner.

"Naturally he has the ability to put any bowler under pressure at any given time. That's very exciting.

"The most import at thing is that as a group we keep things very simple and are focused and continually work hard on those big partnerships that contribute to winning."

Another World Cup hero, Jofra Archer, must wait for his Test bow after James Anderson, Stuart Broad and Chris Woakes were named as England's frontline seam attack.

The 24-year-old fast bowler was England's leading wicket-taker but needed a post-tournament lay off due to a side strain, with Root keen not to risk his fitness as the games come thick and fast in a compressed five-match series.

"Jofra's obviously coming back from quite a serious injury," he said.

"We looked at the conditions and we made a decision on what we thought was best going to take 20 wickets here.

"It also allows him time to get absolutely ready and fit and make sure his workload is up and ready to go for later on in the series if he needs to make an impact."

Australia have named former captain Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft together in their squad for the first time since the trio served suspensions for their part in a ball-tampering scandal.

Smith's successor Tim Paine used his briefing to talk up the high standards of behaviour set in his regime – albeit by mistakenly attributing a quote to Winston Churchill – but Root feels such matters should not be a focus of the England dressing room.  

"We'll see how that unfolds over the course of this series, but their behaviour doesn't really concern me," he added.

"My concern is we go about things in our own way, we know what we're about as a side and how we want to go about things. 

"It's really important we look after that and don't get too wrapped up in how they play their cricket."

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