Former director of cricket Andrew Strauss wants England to succeed where they failed in the wake of 2005 Ashes glory and build a dynasty off the back of their Cricket World Cup triumph.

Strauss was part of the side that defeated Australia 2-1 in a thrilling home series 14 years ago and was then a key figure behind the scenes as England ripped up their white-ball strategy following a humiliating group-stage exit at the World Cup in 2015.

Having been forced to step down from his director role last year to support his wife Ruth, who was being treated for terminal cancer, Strauss witnessed the culmination of his planning as Eoin Morgan's men edged New Zealand in an epic final at Lord's on Sunday.

But Strauss issued a warning to the side ahead of the Ashes starting next month on the back of his own experiences as a player, when the Test side failed to win any of the three series following that famous 2005 win, before being whitewashed 5-0 in Australia when the battle for the urn was renewed in 2006-07.

"I think there are a lot of similarities there," Strauss told Omnisport at the world premiere of 'The Edge'. "I think the lesson from 2005 is that was a high watermark and then we retreated back again.

"We need to make this a sort of stepping stone to even bigger and better things. You can't beat winning a World Cup but you can create a dynasty for yourself in terms of performance.

"But not just performance, how you are. We want our players to be people that people want to aspire to be. I think we've got a great group of players that are able to do that."

Two of England's World Cup heroes, Jason Roy and Jofra Archer, are set to make the transition to the Test format – although the latter will only do so once he has recovered from a side strain.

And Strauss sees no reason why the pair, full of confidence after Sunday's dramatic victory, cannot transfer their skills to the longer form.

"I'm not sure either of them are actually white-ball specialists," Strauss added. "I think they've played white-ball cricket up until now, I think both of them are really well-seasoned to play Test cricket.

"It's not going to be easy, Test cricket is a different game and it challenges you in different ways as well, but I think they'll be incredibly confident.

"They've done it on the biggest stage of all which is a great hurdle to overcome, and we've got a great opportunity to beat the Aussies again, so let's take it."

Jason Roy's "bravado" will help transfer his form from 50-over cricket to the Test format, according to England fielding coach Paul Collingwood.

Roy was one of the heroes of England's triumphant Cricket World Cup campaign, contributing to the key run out of Martin Guptill from the final ball of the Super Over as the hosts defeated New Zealand courtesy of a superior boundary count at the end of an epic final at Lord's on Sunday.

And the opener's batting was a major factor throughout the tournament, scoring his 443 runs from just seven innings at a strike rate of more than 115, setting the tone for England with a typically belligerent approach alongside Jonny Bairstow.

Roy's form has earned a maiden Test call-up as England prepare to face Ireland over four days next week before the start of the Ashes against Australia on August 1, and Collingwood has no doubts the Surrey batsman's coursing confidence will aid his adaptation to the longer form.

"White-ball cricket and red-ball cricket are completely different ends of the spectrum," Collingwood told Omnisport, speaking at the world premiere of 'The Edge'.

"But if he can bring that kind of that form, and that confidence and bravado that he brings to that white-ball game, I'm sure he'll be able to go out there and succeed.

"He can quickly take a game away from the opposition if he gets on a roll, so it's exciting times to see people like that come into the side."

Ian Bell, a former Ashes winner alongside Collingwood, echoed his old team-mate's sentiments.

"I was really impressed actually at times with Jason Roy because even though he hasn't batted at the top of the order for Surrey, I thought there were times at the World Cup when the ball did move around and technically he played as well as anyone," Bell told Omnisport.

"He has an opportunity… when you face Australia in the Ashes it's high pressure and they've got one of the best bowling attacks in world cricket right now. It will be a challenge but there's no doubt he's got the ability to do something very special."

Former England captain David Gower supports the decision to hand Jason Roy a Test call-up with the Ashes looming.

After starring at the top of the order in his country's victorious Cricket World Cup campaign, Roy was named in England's Test squad for the first time on Wednesday, as part of a 13-man party to face Ireland at Lord's next week.

The 28-year-old Surrey batsman, who averages 38 in first-class cricket, now looks certain to open in the first Test against Australia, starting on August 1, having earned selection through his excellent form in limited-overs cricket.

Gower told Omnisport: "Detractors will say that Jason Roy's first-class career has been nothing like his one-day international career. I put something out on Twitter weeks ago now saying 'the talent this man is, can we not adapt him to Test cricket?'

"There are people like David Warner who have successfully become great Test players having been one-day players; there are people like Rohit Sharma who will never play a Test match for India again despite the fact he's just got five hundreds in the World Cup, so it doesn't work for everyone.

"But we [England] don't have particularly great alternatives. My view is that if it works it will be fantastic. If it takes a while to get going, or if it takes him a while to learn the ropes of being a Test match player, then actually we're no worse off than we are at the moment.

"I would happily endorse him as a real talent, who with a bit of luck and hard work could knuckle down to it."

Fast bowler Jofra Archer - another standout member of England's victorious World Cup team - has also been tipped to play a role in the Ashes, although he will miss the Test against Ireland due to a side strain.

"Again, Jofra is an extraordinary talent, he's a brilliant talent," added Gower, a member of the England team that reached the 1979 World Cup final.

"While one would be careful maybe about his workload, as they are about all England's bowlers, which is only sensible, again he is such a beautiful raw talent that I would have him in the side."

 

- David Gower is touring theatres in October and November with his sell-out show 'On The Front Foot'. Buy your tickets from www.david-gower.com.

Jason Roy is set to make his Test debut for England against Ireland, putting him in line for an Ashes call-up next month.

Star batsman Roy is yet to feature in the longest format at international level but was vital to hosts England's Cricket World Cup triumph.

His form in that tournament has earned him a first shot at Test cricket, selected among 13 players to face Ireland in a four-day contest at Lord's with Olly Stone and Lewis Gregory the other uncapped men to earn a spot.

The trio are also included in a 16-man group for a pre-Ashes camp.

There is good news for England, too, with James Anderson's inclusion in the squad, the experienced bowler having recovered from a calf tear.

However, Jofra Archer, another waiting for a Test bow, and Mark Wood are both suffering with side strains.

Wood is set for four to six weeks out while Archer will have a period of rest and return from Barbados later this month, with national selector Ed Smith stating the latter will be out "for a while".

Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler - stars of the World Cup success - have also been granted leave until the pre-Ashes camp ahead of the August 1 opener.

The four-day clash with Ireland begins on July 24.

 

England squad in full for Ireland Test: Joe Root, Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes.

England squad in full for pre-Ashes camp: Moeen Ali, James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Lewis Gregory, Jack Leach, Joe Root, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, Olly Stone, Chris Woakes, Mark Wood.

England's Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow walked to the crease with the eyes of the cricket world on them.

The pre-tournament favourites and hosts were on the brink of a surprising Cricket World Cup elimination, knowing victories against India - and then New Zealand - were virtually essential to book a place in the semi-finals.

A string of unexpected defeats, defined by unsuccessful run chases, had a nation on edge, but on this occasion at least, against India, Roy and Bairstow had the chance to write the script. The chance to set the tone. The chance to keep England's World Cup dreams alive.

A breathtaking 160-run partnership in just 22.1 overs followed, the England pair negotiating their way through a tricky opening period before freeing the arms in the fashion fans have come to expect.

Roy, back from a hamstring injury, had the best seat in the house as a fired-up Bairstow thrashed 10 fours and six sixes in a scintillating 111. 

Bairstow's opening partner fell for 66 but the damage was done, England pushing to a total of 337-7 that would prove far too much for India.

Another must-win match followed and so did a big opening partnership.

Roy (60) and Bairstow (106) added 123 in 18.4 overs on this occasion, again setting the platform for a 300-plus score that England's bowlers comfortably defended against New Zealand.

England then headed into a semi-final against the old enemy, Australia, with their mojo back. 

And the attacking brand of cricket that saw England claim the world number one ranking in the 50-over format was on full display in that contest, too.

Roy and Bairstow faced a different challenge, chasing on that occasion, but the result was exactly the same: another 100-plus partnership in quick time. 

Set 224 for victory, Roy was the main aggressor this time, walloping five sixes in a 65-ball 85 before an unjust dismissal. Bairstow added 34, too, as they wiped 124 from the target in 17.2 overs, effectively ending the game as a contest with a mix of timing, game awareness and, of course, customary aggression.

The contribution of new-ball bowlers Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer in England's recent resurgence cannot be denied, but it is Roy and Bairstow who have been the driving forces.

Of the 14 century-plus partnerships for the first wicket at the World Cup, Roy and Bairstow have provided four in just seven attempts. A 95-run partnership between the duo came in a clash against West Indies, too.

And the pair's importance to England was highlighted by the three matches that Roy missed. England lost two of those, stand-in James Vince and Bairstow combining for opening stands of 44, 1 and 0.

All of that means that the New Zealand camp will arrive at Lord's on Sunday having spent honours analysing, reviewing, fretting and plotting. Just how do they get Roy and Bairstow early?

England's success at the top of the order comes in stark contrast to New Zealand's early efforts with the bat.

The Black Caps have only produced only one opening stand of 100 runs or more at the World Cup, Martin Guptill and the now-dropped Colin Munro providing it against Sri Lanka in the third match of the tournament, almost six weeks ago.

Guptill and Munro combined for an unbeaten 137-run union on that occasion but the opening partnerships since - 35, 0, 12, 0, 5, 29, 2 and 1 - make grim reading for New Zealand fans.

Munro lost his place after a six-wicket defeat to Pakistan but his replacement, Henry Nicholls, has scored just 36 runs in three matches. Guptill, the leading run-scorer at the 2015 World Cup with 547, has managed only 167 in eight matches at the 2019 edition, and that tally includes a first-up 73 not out.

"No one is more frustrated than what I am," Guptill told 1 News.

The consequence of New Zealand's poor opening partnerships is an unhealthy reliance on captain Kane Williamson and, to a lesser extent, veteran Ross Taylor. And while the experienced pair have continued to dig their side out of trouble, another poor start in the final could prove costly.

Roy and Bairstow have provided England with an incredible source of momentum throughout this World Cup.

One more match-defining partnership from the pair will go a long way to helping England win the tournament for the first time.

England star Jason Roy has been fined after reacting badly to his controversial dismissal in the Cricket World Cup semi-final win over Australia.

The opener's stunning knock was ended on 85 when he was given out caught behind despite replays showing he made no contact with a Pat Cummins delivery.

Roy initially refused to walk, but England had no reviews left so he had no choice but to leave the field.

He did so in evident disgust at umpire Kumar Dharmasena's decision, with his reaction constituting dissent and a breach of Article 2.8 of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel.

The 28-year-old, who admitted the offence and sanction, has been fined 30 per cent of his match fee and awarded two demerit points, but will be available for Sunday's final against New Zealand.

Eoin Morgan's side won by eight wickets at Edgbaston, having reduced Australia to 223 all out before completing their chase in 32.1 overs. 

Eoin Morgan lauded England's remarkable ODI revival after his side reached the Cricket World Cup final four years after a humiliating group-stage exit.

An eight-wicket thrashing of Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday underlined England's quality, which is a long way removed from the abysmal displays they produced at the 2015 tournament.

Back then they missed out on the knockout phase after losing to Bangladesh, marking a low point for English cricket in the one-day game.

But on Sunday they will contest a Lord's final with New Zealand, which Morgan could not have foreseen after their miserable outing in Australia and New Zealand last time out.

"If you told me after the last World Cup that we'd reach the final I wouldn't have believed you," the captain told the BBC's Test Match Special.

"It sums up how far we have come in the last four years. Everyone should take a huge amount of credit.

"Today was close to a perfect performance, right from the two bowlers up front. Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer bowled a hell of a spell.

"They put pressure on with early wickets and allowed us to stay on the front foot."

Speaking on the field, Morgan also praised the fans who roared England on to victory, marking their third triumph in a row after consecutive wins over India and the Black Caps pulled the hosts back from the brink of another early exit.

"I would like to thank the fans – we've had unbelievable support and Edgbaston has always been very kind to us," he said.

"Having beaten India in the group stages here we would've come here with similar confidence. The way we have taken momentum from the last two group games into the semi-finals is very important.

"We set the tone early and when we got on top we made Australia pay."

Aaron Finch conceded Australia had been "totally outplayed" by England as the hosts stormed into the Cricket World Cup final on Thursday.

England secured an eight-wicket win at Edgbaston after bowling Australia out for 223, with Jason Roy's explosive 85 doing much of the damage in a chase that was completed in 32.1 overs.

Australia, who won what was considered a potentially pivotal toss, were on the back foot almost immediately and Finch was among the early wickets to fall after failing to score.

"We were totally outplayed," said the captain after Australia's first World Cup semi-final loss. "The way they set the tone with the ball in those first 10 overs was a huge part in the game.

"You expect the new ball to seam a bit on any surface but they bowled a great length, hitting the stumps a lot.

"There are still a lot of positives to take out of the campaign and from the last few months – we've come a long way from where we were last year in ODI cricket in this country.

"You always want to win the trophy but there have been a lot of positives. A lot of hard work has gone in from a lot of people. I'm proud of how the group has progressed but this still hurts.

"We tried to change it up as much as we could but Roy and [Jonny] Bairstow are so dynamic when they are on top. We didn't execute as well as we could and got hurt by a very good England team."

It is the first time Australia have lost to England at a 50-over World Cup since 1992, which is also the last time the latter reached the final. 

Much of the talk around England and Australia's Cricket World Cup semi-final focused on one word – pressure.

And, with serial World Cup winners and reigning champions Australia perhaps more intent on Ashes glory later on this tour, the majority of those discussions centred on England.

Would they wilt at the semi-final stage? Could they chase down a total? Would the expectancy of the Edgbaston faithful weigh heavy on their shoulders?

The answer to all those questions was a resounding 'no', as Eoin Morgan's men stormed into a Lord's final against New Zealand with an eight-wicket thrashing on Thursday in front of an increasingly raucous crowd that belted out 'Sweet Caroline' with intensifying vigour as the end drew near.

A developing trend at these finals has seen sides win the toss, opt to bat, post a score and subsequently squeeze the opposition on deteriorating pitches.

Coming into this encounter, 17 of the previous 21 matches had been won by the side batting first – a sequence that included England's victories over India and New Zealand to secure their place in the last four.

On both occasions, the hosts went big and comfortably defended their totals, but the two prior outings had seen altogether different outcomes.

England failed to chase 233 against Sri Lanka at Headingley and were well short as Australia cruised to a 64-run win at Lord's.

Before the tournament, Morgan's men were seen as the team that could overhaul any score, thumping Pakistan 4-0 in an ODI series that featured two successful chases in excess of 340.

Those losses to Sri Lanka and Australia changed that perception, at least among pundits and the public, and another P-word – pressure – became a significant factor in the equation.

But that was nowhere to be seen at Edgbaston on Thursday, as Australia were rolled out for 223 before a below-par target was overhauled with 107 balls remaining.

Once again, England owed much to Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow, who added 124 for the opening stand inside 18 overs – their fourth successive century partnership.

In Wednesday's media conference, Aaron Finch talked up the importance of the first 10 overs. Whoever started the better would likely go on and win, was the suggestion.

The Australia captain got his first wish in winning the toss and opting to bat, only to fall to Jofra Archer for a golden duck and then watch as David Warner and Peter Handscomb swiftly joined him back in the dressing room. After 10 overs, Australia were 27-3 and had struck only three fours.

England, by contrast, had surpassed that tally inside six overs and had even added a Roy maximum for good measure en route to being 50-0 at the end of the first powerplay.

The chat in the media box during the innings break was that 224 could prove a challenging target – after all, England had failed in similar circumstances against Sri Lanka while there were lessons to be learned from New Zealand's semi-final win over India 24 hours previously, when the Black Caps successfully defended 239.

But Roy and Bairstow strode out as if this was a bilateral series bash-fest, an approach underlined by the former launching Nathan Lyon's first ball for six and reverse sweeping for four later in the same over.

Struggling to stem the flow, Finch turned to the occasional leg-spin of Steve Smith. Roy responded by hammering three straight sixes, the third an absolute monster into the top tier.

The early swing Chris Woakes and Archer had enjoyed was not evident for Mitchell Starc and Jason Behrendorff, while England's openers took full advantage as Roy produced another performance that will only intensify calls for him to be included in the Ashes squad.

Ahead of a World Cup final, that is a discussion for another day, but this display should at least put to bed all the prior talk of pressure and whether it would overwhelm this England team.

Exactly a year on from the men's football team's semi-final heartache, the Edgbaston crowd sang 'Cricket's coming home'. That is yet to be decided but, on this evidence, if England are found wanting at Lord's, it is unlikely to be due to the gravity of the occasion.

Chris Woakes was delighted as England demonstrated their class in an eight-wicket demolition of Australia to reach the Cricket World Cup final.

With figures of 3-20, Woakes' man-of-the-match display epitomised England's dominance of Thursday's clash at Edgbaston, where Australia were bowled out for 223.

Jason Roy (85) starred with the bat as the tournament hosts chased down the target in 32.1 overs, setting up a Lord's showdown with New Zealand on Sunday.

"I'm pretty speechless," said Woakes after England reached the final for the first time since 1992. "It was an incredible performance from the whole team.

"It started with the bowling performance and then the way they [the batsmen] knocked that off was outstanding.

"There were some nerves around this morning but that's natural going into a semi-final. The way we produced the goods just showed how good we are and where we are at as a team.

"It hasn't sunk in that we're in a World Cup final and hopefully we can go all the way.

"We were tipped as favourties so it was important to get to the semi-final in the first place, and then to win this in this fashion against this Australia side on the best ground in the world is amazing."

Jason Roy spearheaded a superb all-round England display in a crushing eight-wicket victory over bitter rivals Australia to set up a Cricket World Cup final with New Zealand. 

England opener Jason Roy thinks Australia's confidence may have suffered a blow with their 10-run loss to South Africa on Saturday.

Australia were the first team to qualify for the Cricket World Cup semi-finals but missed out on finishing top of the table as they went down to the Proteas at Old Trafford after India had beaten Sri Lanka at Headingley.

The reigning champions will consequently face tournament hosts England in the semi-finals at Edgbaston on Thursday.

Australia won by 64 runs when the two teams met at Lord's last week, but Roy believes ending the group stage with a defeat may have altered the mood in the Australian camp.

"It should be a great game. I think them losing to South Africa might have knocked their confidence a bit," said Roy.

"When you get to the semi-final stage any team you come up against is going to be a tough ask, mentally and physically. They hammered us at Lord's but who knows what it is going to bring?

"As exciting as it is, we've got to stay as relaxed as we can, understanding that it is a World Cup semi-final that doesn't come around very often and that we've been working towards this for years."

Roy sat out the first meeting with Australia, as well as the games against Afghanistan and Pakistan, due to a hamstring injury.

"I'll be honest, there was a bit of a fear I might be out [for the entire tournament] but I needed to stay positive around the group," said the Surrey batsman.

"I was staying around the lads and travelling with them, so I had to keep giving out positive vibes and try to help where I can.

"But, having been dropped in the Champions Trophy [in 2017] and then working my backside off to get here, and being in good form only to then get injured, I was like, 'give me a break!'

"I thought I was having no luck so that was frustrating and a bit hard to deal with, but I kept things relaxed, worked hard and thankfully I got back and was able to play.

"I'm right where I wanted to be, both mentally and physically. This is the reward for the hard work and sacrifices we all make.

"I didn't put myself in the IPL auction, I did everything I possibly could to get myself to this point I'm at now."

Australia spinner Nathan Lyon expects England to feel a greater burden to perform and reach the final, though.

He said: "They are full of world-class players. They have been the number one team for a couple of years now. They should be going into this World Cup as favourites. It's all on them.

"It's their World Cup to lose if you ask me. We have got nothing to lose, only got stuff to gain."

After five arduous weeks, the Cricket World Cup group stage has reached its climax and four teams are left standing.

Hosts and pre-tournament favourites England briefly flirted with a disappointing early exit before rallying to beat India and New Zealand and reach the last four.

Lying in wait are old rivals Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday, while India and New Zealand will do battle first in Manchester in two days' time.

But before we sit back and take in the final acts of a hugely enjoyable tournament, let's review the thrills and spills (and a couple of comedy moments) of an enthralling group stage.

 

Rihanna delights in Durham

Over a decade ago, Rihanna's smash hit 'Umbrella' enjoyed an extended stay at the top of the UK album charts but there was no need for the brollies at Durham as West Indies faced off with Sri Lanka.

Unfortunately, the Barbados-born popstar saw the Windies beaten by 23 runs, but there was a tearful reunion with assistant coach Roddy Eastwick – a former school teacher of Rihanna's. 


Bees create buzz at The Riverside

An unbroken 175-run stand between Hashim Amla and Faf du Plessis stung Sri Lanka at The Riverside.

But it was a swarm of bees that created quite the buzz on social media. The honey-loving insects caused a sudden delay, with players having to hit the deck to take evasive action.


Roy clatters Wilson

We are very, very, very sorry Joel Wilson…but this was undoubtedly hilarious.

Jason Roy brought up a century in England's beating of Bangladesh but, while tracking the progress of the ball, did not see the poor, unaware umpire who was completely clattered by the opener in comical scenes.

Once back to his feet, a slightly sheepish Wilson saw the funny side.


Bairstow answers critics head on

England's defeats to Sri Lanka and Australia drew plenty of criticism at home, not least from Michael Vaughan, which led to an unsavoury back-and-forth with Jonny Bairstow.

But Bairstow responded in impressive fashion, making centuries against India and New Zealand to help England progress to the last four.

Celebrating that latter century, Bairstow rubbed his hair in a seemingly light-hearted jibe at Vaughan's previous treatment to bolster his hairline.


Stokes or Woakes?

Two stunning catches, but who did it better – Ben Stokes or Chris Woakes?

All-rounder Stokes plucked a stunning one-hander in the deep off Andile Phehlukwayo in the tournament's opening match between England and South Africa at The Oval.

Not to be outdone, Woakes took a brilliant full-length dive on the boundary to send Rishabh Pant packing in England's much-needed win over India. Superman, eat your heart out.


Hat-trick heroes

Afghanistan had the chance for a famous upset against India at the Rose Bowl. Twelve runs were needed off four deliveries…enter Mohammed Shami.

The paceman took the vital wicket of dangerman Mohammad Nabi and followed up with the scalps of Aftab Alam and Mujeeb Ur Rahman to end Afghanistan's hopes. Three wickets in three balls.

New Zealand lost out to trans-Tasman rivals Australia at Lord's, but Trent Boult had individual reason to celebrate with a hat-trick of his own.

A stunning finish in the final over of Australia's innings saw Usman Khawaja, Mitchell Starc and Jason Behrendorff fall to full, in-swinging deliveries.

Boult, who has donated the ball to the MCC Museum, had to endure a nervy wait after a Behrendorff review.


Starc brilliance takes down Stokes

England made a dismal start in their pursuit of 286 against Australia at Lord's, slumping to 53-4.

Ben Stokes' courageous 89 threatened a fightback at the Home of Cricket. That was until Mitchell Starc's unplayable yorker swung in late to rattle the base of the stumps to end Stokes' resilience and England's chances of victory.


Pakistan deny Afghanistan

Afghanistan finished without a point after the group games but will rue a couple of missed opportunities – not least versus Pakistan, who slumped to 156-6 chasing 228 at Headingley. 

But captain Gulbadin Naib gave up 18 costly runs in the 46th over and Pakistan edged home with a couple of balls to spare against the underdogs in a dramatic finale.


Farewell Chris

Chris Gayle's final World Cup did not exactly go to plan. The explosive batsman made 242 runs from nine innings as West Indies – fancied by many to challenge – crashed out.

His final knock against Afghanistan yielded just seven runs, but there was time for some typical flamboyance when the charismatic Gayle celebrated a low catch with some press-ups.

A tidy turn with his occasional off-spin also yielded 1-28 and the 39-year-old lapped up the acclaim at stumps.

Jonny Bairstow made another magnificent century under pressure to set up a 119-run thrashing of New Zealand at The Riverside which sealed a Cricket World Cup semi-final spot for England.

Bairstow hit back at England's critics in emphatic fashion with a hundred in a crucial win over India on Sunday and the opener reached three figures again as England posted 305-8 after Eoin Morgan won the toss in Durham on Wednesday.

Destructive openers Bairstow (106 off 99 balls) and Jason Roy (60 off 61) put on 123 for the first wicket and the hosts looked to be on course for at least 350 before the Black Caps fought back.

Trent Boult, Matt Henry and Jimmy Neesham took two wickets apiece on a pitch that slowed up during the England innings.

New Zealand, missing paceman Lockie Ferguson due to a hamstring injury, were bowled out for 186 in reply, slumping to a third consecutive defeat after Kane Williamson was run out backing up at the non-striker's end by Mark Wood - who took 3-34 on his home ground.

England, in great danger of missing out on the last four following back-to-back defeats to Sri Lanka and Australia, will finish third and face either Australia or India at Edgbaston next Thursday in the semi-finals.

Tom Latham top scored with 57 for a Black Caps side that are all-but assured of a place in the last four, with Pakistan almost certainly on their way out on net run-rate even if they beat Bangladesh at Lord's on Friday.

 

BAIRSTOW AND ROY FIRE AGAIN

Bairstow and Roy made another blistering start, a rusty Tim Southee being sprayed around in his first match of the tournament before Roy drove the disciplined Neesham (2-41) to Mitchell Santner in the covers.

The aggressive Bairstow remained on the front foot, smashing Southee for a straight six and dispatching the paceman for two boundaries in his next over to reach three figures off 95 balls.

England lost their way after Boult (2-56) snared Joe Root (24) and Bairstow chopped on to a Henry delivery, gifting wickets away with poor aerial shots, Morgan (42) the only other batsman to make a notable contribution.

 

WOOD TIPS THE BALANCE IN ENGLAND'S FAVOUR

Henry Nicholls was trapped leg before first ball by Chris Woakes and opted against a review, which would have saved him, before Jos Buttler took a great catch down the leg side to remove Martin Guptill off Jofra Archer.

Williamson (27) and Ross Taylor were rebuilding nicely until Wood got a fingertip on a drive from the former skipper and the current captain was short of his ground.

Taylor was run out in the next over and New Zealand were teetering on 128-6 after Neesham chopped on to Wood, then Ben Stokes struck with his first ball to dismiss Colin de Grandhomme.

 

LATHAM DELAYS THE INEVITABLE

New Zealand never looked like chasing down their target, but Latham spent welcome time at the crease.

The wicketkeeper-batsman, poor with the bat in the World Cup so far, struck five boundaries before he was caught behind off Liam Plunkett.

Wood got rid of Santner and bowled Henry before Adil Rashid had Boult stumped to seal an emphatic win and see England through.

Eoin Morgan was delighted to see his batting line-up play aggressively against India's spinners as England kept their Cricket World Cup semi-final hopes in their own hands with a 31-run win at Edgbaston.

Jonny Bairstow responded to a difficult week that saw him come in for criticism from former England captain Michael Vaughan with a brilliant century and a 160-run opening stand with the fit-again Jason Roy.

Yuzvendra Chahal (0-88) and Kuldeep Yadav (1-72) particularly toiled on a batsman-friendly pitch in Birmingham and captain Morgan praised his side for playing an attacking brand of cricket.

"Jason Roy coming back in, him and Jonny Bairstow up the top, Jonny going and getting a hundred - that was magnificent to watch," he said at the post-match presentation.

"I think probably the continuation of partnerships right throughout took us to a quite formidable total.

"I think that [taking on the spinners] was probably the winning and losing of the game, from 10 to 20 overs we got 90-95 runs, which is quite substantial early.

"It lays a huge platform for the way we want to play. The two main spinners for India being taken on is great to see. That's the way we want to play our cricket."

England will be sure of a semi-final place by beating New Zealand in their final group game, but Morgan warned his team to avoid a complacent attitude.

"There's absolutely no easy game in this tournament. [The] game between Pakistan and Afghanistan proved that," he said.

"Every game in this World Cup has been extremely tough for everybody and I think it'll continue to be."

Man of the match Bairstow was left to reflect on a week in which he suggested people were waiting for England to fail, leading Vaughan to question his mentality.

"I think it's been frustrating a little bit for the guys. We know how well we can play," he said.

"We were pretty good bat, ball and in the field and I think that there's still things we can improve on going forward to New Zealand next week."

Rohit Sharma made a century and Virat Kohli 66 in their stand of 138, but ultimately India's scoring was too slow to chase down a target of 338.

Captain Kohli disputed that England's score was only just above par and felt India did well to reel in their opponents, with Mohammed Shami claiming a five-for.

"I thought they were going to get 360 at one stage. I think we did well to pull them back," he said.

"In the end 10 to 15 [fewer runs] would have been better because we had them under pressure at the 40-over mark, but Ben [Stokes] played a very good innings as well.

"You have to accept it, take it in your stride and accept the opposition played better than you on the day and they were just more clinical in terms of their execution with their plan." 

Page 1 of 4
© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.