England's bid to level the Ashes at Headingley was hampered by rain and bad light at Headingley as Australia's batsmen faced just 18 overs in the first two sessions of the third Test.

The hosts, 1-0 down in the five-match series, had inserted their opponents under gloomy skies after winning the toss in Leeds, yet play was delayed for 80 minutes due to showers, and only four overs were possible before the inclement weather returned.

During that time, however, Jofra Archer made the early breakthrough by drawing the edge of the recalled Marcus Harris (8), whose opening partner David Warner lived a charmed life, particularly against the impressive Stuart Broad.

Play resumed again at 14:00 local time (13:00 GMT) and Broad eventually got his reward, Usman Khawaja (8) given out following England's review when his bat brushed the ball en route to wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow's gloves.

The players were forced off once more due to further rain and only 3.1 overs had been bowled when proceedings were halted again, this time due to bad light.

Warner, who was unbeaten on 26 having been out for single figures in each of his previous four innings in the series, appeared only too happy to depart, though England's players were less impressed as he and Marnus Labuschagne (7 not out) walked off while the umpires checked the light.

The latest interruption meant tea was taken at 16:10 on a frustrating opening day.

England removed Marcus Harris and Usman Khawaja cheaply in Australia's innings, but the first day of the third Ashes Test continued to be interrupted by showers at Headingley.

Both the toss - which England won - and the start of play were delayed by bad weather and the first ball was finally delivered 80 minutes after the scheduled start time.

Only four overs were possible before the rain returned, by which time Jofra Archer had dismissed recalled opener Harris, who edged behind on eight.

Play resumed at 14:00 local time (13:00 GMT) and Stuart Broad soon had Australia two down when a delivery down the leg side brushed the bat of Khawaja (8) before reaching wicketkeeper Jonny Bairstow.

Broad and Bairstow were both convinced of the edge and though umpire Chris Gaffaney was unmoved, England's review showed a clear nick to leave Australia 25-2.

Another 14 had been added by the time the latest round of rain arrived and, despite some initial hesitancy on the part of Joe Root and his team to leave the field, play was once again halted with David Warner (18 not out) and Marnus Labuschagne - yet to get off the mark - having seen Australia to 39-2.

Dimuth Karunaratne was on the brink of a fifty at the end of a weather-affected first day of the second Test between Sri Lanka and New Zealand.

Captain Karunaratne scored a second-innings century as Sri Lanka won the first match in Galle by six wickets and he looked ready to continue that fine form on Thursday despite rain wreaking havoc in Colombo.

The opener was unbeaten on 49 with the hosts 85-2 when bad light stopped play after just 36.3 overs.

After a torrential downpour resulted in a delayed start, the hosts won the toss and elected to bat first.

Lahiru Thirimanne made two from 35 balls before sending William Somerville (1-20) to Kane Williamson at short cover, though Kusal Mendis injected some urgency and Sri Lanka reached tea at 71-1.

More rain prolonged the teams' absence from the field and Mendis edged Colin de Grandhomme (1-14) behind to BJ Watling on 32 shortly after their return.

Karunaratne was unable to add to his six fours before umpires called a halt to the action, with Angelo Mathews yet to get off the mark after facing 14 deliveries.

Recalled Australia opener Marcus Harris lasted only a dozen balls as Jofra Archer struck early in the third Test, but the rain returned at Headingley and forced the players off after four overs.

Showers initially postponed the toss and came back shortly after Joe Root had inserted Australia under gloomy skies in Leeds, meaning play did not start until 12:10 local time (11:10 GMT), a delay of 80 minutes.

Root's decision to try to take advantage of the day-one conditions looked wise when an out-of-sorts David Warner played and missed at a series of deliveries from his recent nemesis Stuart Broad, but it was Archer who claimed the first wicket, Harris nicking behind when on eight with the final ball of the fourth over.

Both Warner and the England players followed Harris back in, though, as the rain fell and the covers were brought on with Australia 12-1 as lunch was taken at 12:45 local time.

Harris had been restored to the XI for Cameron Bancroft in one of three changes made by Australia, with Steve Smith – missing following a bout of concussion – and Peter Siddle also replaced by Marnus Labuschagne and James Pattinson.

England, 1-0 down in the five-match series after Australia's win at Edgbaston was followed by a drawn Test at Lord's, were unchanged as opener Jason Roy was passed fit after suffering a blow to the helmet in the nets on Tuesday.

Australia opener Cameron Bancroft was dropped for Marcus Harris at Headingley while Jason Roy was declared fit for an unchanged England, who opted to field first in the third Ashes Test.

Tim Paine's team, 1-0 up in the five-match series after their victory at Edgbaston was followed by a drawn Test at Lord's, made three changes to their XI.

One was enforced as Steve Smith was ruled out on Tuesday following a bout of concussion, and Marnus Labuschagne, his replacement during the game at Lord's, came into the team from the start in Leeds.

The tourists also chose to replace opener Bancroft with Harris and bring in seamer James Pattinson – who featured at Edgbaston – for Peter Siddle.

England had concerns over Roy's availability after he suffered a blow to the helmet in the nets on Tuesday, but he was declared fine to feature following concussion tests.

The toss was put back by 40 minutes due to drizzle on a dull morning and though play was due to commence at 11:20 local time (10:20 GMT), further rain brought the covers back on and delayed the start.

Whatever happens at Headingley and beyond, Marnus Labuschagne will struggle to ever forget his first innings in Ashes cricket.

The Australia batsman made history when becoming the first concussion sub as a replacement for Steve Smith on the final day of the second Test against England at Lord's. After ducking his first delivery from Jofra Archer, the next one struck him flush in the grille – Labuschagne was down (albeit not for long) but, crucially, not out.

Rising to his feet so quickly a boxing referee would barely have started counting to 10, the 25-year-old recovered his senses, survived the oncoming barrage of short stuff and came out the other side with a half-century, a valiant knock in trying circumstances that helped preserve his side's slender 1-0 series lead.

It was not the first time Labuschagne had capitalised on an unexpected chance that came his way, though.

When Shaun Marsh was selected in Australia’s squad for the Cricket World Cup earlier this year, Glamorgan had to find a new overseas player in a hurry.

Mark Wallace, relatively new into his role as director of cricket at the Welsh county, followed up on a tip-off from an old club colleague Down Under to fill the void, taking a "bit of a punt" on Labuschagne, a player with an unspectacular first-class record but a hunger to improve.

"The link between myself and Marnus is that we have played for the same grade club in Brisbane, which is Redlands Tigers, albeit I played 15 years before he did," Wallace explained to Omnisport.

"Our paths never crossed, but when I took on the job [in February] I received a text message from a lad I had played with out there called Blair Copeland who is now a coach. He said, 'if you're looking for an overseas player, there is a lad who plays at the club called Marnus Labuschagne'.  

"I'd heard of Marnus because he had played for Australia by then, but I probably thought this was more like the sort of thing where he [Blair] was one of his mates, so I said thank you and got on with things.

"But when Shaun Marsh was picked for the World Cup, we suddenly needed an overseas player. I went back and had a look at this guy, did a bit of digging around, and the message we kept getting about him was that he was a good player but he was going to be an influence around the dressing room and just wanted to play cricket, wanted to get better at the game, and that was what we were after.

"We wanted a different style of overseas player, someone who was young and hungry. We went for him and it worked out pretty well."

Pretty well is an understatement.

Labuschagne amassed 1,114 runs in 10 first-class games for Glamorgan, hitting five centuries. The first of them arrived on his County Championship debut, Northamptonshire the opponents, while there was a match-saving 182 to deny Sussex down by the seaside at Hove and then hundreds in both innings against Worcestershire towards the end of his stint.

"We weren't surprised because he's a good player – we just didn't know he was that good," Wallace admitted. "We haven't genuinely got a bad word to say about him. He just wanted to talk cricket, be involved in cricket and get better.

"It was a little bit of a punt, but we wanted someone different and all the feedback had been how this was a young, influential guy. He was just desperate to improve and county cricket really suited him.

"He just loved playing – with most overseas [players] the thing that strikes them when they come over is the amount we play, whereas with Marnus he just thought that was brilliant. It gave him the opportunity to play all the time, to practice all the time.

"He got a hundred in his first game and never took his foot off the gas after that."

Labuschagne's county performances boosted his Test prospects, yet he still appeared set for a watching brief during the Ashes. That was until Smith was struck by an Archer bouncer, a blow on the neck that created a ripple effect that seems set to be felt by both sides for the remainder of the series.

It also created a sudden opening in the middle order. Smith's stand-in received an early and emphatic wake-up call yet refused to be counted out of the contest, aided by a slight technical tweak to his game that was honed while playing with Glamorgan.

"He did a few things that I think he had developed from being over here," revealed Wallace.

"Marnus clicked with our coach, Matt Maynard, early on and they worked on something where he would take a step down the wicket, as well as over to the off stump. The aim is to take lbw out [of the equation] and you saw him do it a few times to Chris Woakes.

"It was good to see, because you spot something guys have done with you working then on the bigger stage, which for our young guys means they are thinking, 'crikey, Marnus has been working on something here that has transferred into a higher level'. That's great.

"He's very good at solving problems, too. He's so into the game that he's always trying to learn. He's desperate to do well, although all international cricketers are like that. But he's up for the scrap, up for the fight."

After doing an admirable job as a stand-in last time out, the super sub gets the chance to start in the third Test.

Australia head coach Justin Langer said in the build-up to the game in Leeds that Smith has "unfillable shoes" – he has contributed 32 per cent of his team's runs in the first two Tests (and that is without even making it out to the middle on day five at Lord's) and boasts a mind-bending career average of 63.24 in the longest format.

Wallace acknowledges it is a nigh on impossible for Labuschagne to fill the crate-like space left at number four, but expects him to embrace the challenge: "To put him in the same bracket as Steve Smith is just unfair – he is still a young guy making his way in Test cricket.

"But he will have a chance – and all sport is about to take that chance when you get it. He will be up for it and can probably have a positive effect on the series.

"We'd like to see him do well, albeit from our perspective we want England to win. Marnus getting a hundred and England winning by an innings would be perfect."

Glamorgan are hopeful they get the chance to bring Labuschagne back at some stage in the future – so long as they can afford him.

"We would like him to be part of the club long term – hopefully the price hasn't gone up!" Wallace joked.

"I've been speaking to him since he has been away with Australia and he's still in contact, still wishing us good luck. The day the Australia squad was announced I actually spoke to him in the morning, when he was going to meet Justin Langer to find out if he was in or not, and he was not entirely sure.

"We had a Twenty20 game that night, and he said that if he was not in the squad, could he play that evening. I said yes, because we hadn't cancelled his registration yet, but that just showed how he has that nice, childlike enthusiasm just to play the game."

Labuschagne's enthusiasm for the game was evident at Lord's. So, too, was his determination to seize an opportunity that had unexpectedly come his way. As Glamorgan will testify, he's good at doing that.

West Indies will be without all-rounder Keemo Paul for the first Test against India, with Miguel Cummins called up as his replacement.

Paul has been ruled out with an injury to his left ankle and the 21-year-old will remain in Antigua to continue his rehabilitation.

Experienced Cummins, who made his Test debut in a series against India three years ago, taking a career-best 6-48 in the second innings of the second match, features in the 13-man squad in Paul's absence.

"With Keemo ruled out for this match, it’s good to have someone with Miguel's quality back in the squad, as he brings experience to the team," Windies interim head coach Floyd Reifer said.

"Watching him in the last A Team series against India A and the training sessions his lengths have improved. He's a very hard worker and a wicket-taker. I'm sure, if given the opportunity to play, he will make a valuable contribution in our bid to win this series."

The Windies have not won a Test series against India since 2002 and are winless in the past 21 Tests between the teams.

India head into the two-match series, which begins on Thursday, having won three Twenty20s and two ODIs throughout their tour so far.

Tim Paine is not expecting any change in Steve Smith's attitude or application once Australia's talisman returns to action.

Smith will miss the third Ashes Test at Headingley having suffered a delayed concussion after taking a blow to the neck from a fierce Jofra Archer delivery on Saturday.

The 30-year-old, who will be replaced in Leeds by Marnus Labuschagne, has been the form player during the series, hitting 144 and 142 in Australia's win at Edgbaston before tallying 92 at Lord's - coming back out to bat after initially retiring hurt.

Smith hopes to be back in time for the fourth Test, with Paine holding no concerns over the former captain's ability to come back strongly following the setback.

"He's been in really good form, he's been playing really well, so he's disappointed not to be playing," Paine told a news conference.

"He along with the rest of our group understand why he isn't [playing]. Steve loves batting, I don't think that’s going to change.

"Steve's the best player in the world, he will come back in the next Test, if it's the next Test or the tour game [against Derbyshire, which starts on August 29], and we're expecting him to be the same old Steve Smith.

"He's a high-quality player and he'll adapt as he always has."

While Labuschagne's place in the side has been confirmed for the third Test, Paine opted not to give any details to the media over the rest of the XI on the eve of the match.

New Zealand wicketkeeper BJ Watling believes the Black Caps can take plenty of positives into the second Test against Sri Lanka, despite a six-wicket defeat in the first match of the series.

Dimuth Karunaratne scored a century in Galle to inspire Sri Lanka to a comfortable victory, ending a run of seven straight Test defeats to the Black Caps.

Tom Latham's drop let Karunaratne off the hook early on day five, and though the hosts eventually lost their skipper when he edged Tim Southee behind, Sri Lanka had already done the bulk of the work in pursuit of their 268-run target.

Watling, though, insists New Zealand played well in spells throughout the first Test, suggesting missed chances to dismiss Sri Lanka's key figures were crucial in deciding the outcome.

"We're in a good space, we're very disappointed to have lost that match," Watling told a news conference ahead of the second Test in Colombo.

"We'd got ourselves into a good position to win it and obviously, we let it slip a fraction. We felt like we played some pretty good cricket over the five days."

"We lost some key phases of that game. We know it's tough to play in sub-continent conditions and then it'll all happen, and you can lose wickets.

"It's about taking it that little bit deeper. We had a few good starts in the first innings and probably should have scored about 350 on that surface, but we let Sri Lanka back in the game and that cost us.

"We bowled really well in the first innings and put them under a lot of pressure. Even in the second innings we missed a few chances that could have changed the game.

"Our spinners bowled really well, asked a lot of good questions, but we didn't quite take those opportunities."

Watling, who scored 77 in the second innings, added New Zealand cannot entirely blame themselves for the defeat.

"Nobody is trying to drop a catch or miss anything. They were pretty tough chances. We have to give a lot of credit to Sri Lanka's batsmen, especially their opening partnership," he said.

"They took it deep enough to win the Test match and hopefully we can look to make some more inroads into the top order and put the middle order under some more pressure."

New Zealand captain Kane Williamson and Sri Lanka bowler Akila Dananjaya were both reported for suspect bowling actions in the first Test.

They will undergo testing within 14 days from the reporting date - August 18 - though they are permitted to bowl in Colombo.

Captain Joe Root says England must "jump on" the opportunity created by Steve Smith's absence for Australia in the third Ashes Test.

Smith was inspirational in securing a 1-0 lead for Australia after two matches, but he will be missing from the third fixture at Headingley due to a concussion after taking a Jofra Archer bouncer to the neck last time out at Lord's.

Archer was instrumental in England coming back into the series in the match, although the hosts ultimately settled for a draw.

Root wants to see Archer impress again as he compared Smith's absence to when England's all-time leading Test wicket-taker James Anderson hobbled out of the series opener.

"When you're playing someone of his quality, you're looking for a number of different ways to get him out," Root said of Archer's approach to trying to dismiss Smith.

"I felt the way that Jofra bowled in that spell made for great cricket. It's great to be on the field to be a part of that. We felt like we were creating chances all the time.

"But you never want to see someone go off injured like that, you never want to see someone be walked off the field and for him to miss this game.

"There was a lot of concern in our dressing room for his health. It's great to see that he's actually up and about and he's fine and looks as though he's happy within himself.

"It's very unfortunate on their part. We had the challenge of Jimmy [Anderson] going down four overs into a Test match and had to manage that without a replacement.

"You get these swings within a big series like this, every now and again, and when you get your opportunity, you've got to jump on it.

"They'll be huge shoes to fill for whoever comes in for him in Australia's batting line-up and we've got to make sure that we keep trying to exploit these techniques on these wickets."

Asked if Australia, led by Pat Cummins, might match Archer's aggressive assault on batsmen, Root replied: "We'll see. Those are things you have to manage within the game.

"I feel like the guys know what type of bowling [Cummins] is capable of doing. We've seen him do that before in Test cricket. It's just about managing the situation when you face it.

"If he does go to that and the conditions suit pitching it up and swinging it, and it plays into our favour, we'll have to wait and see."

England have had their own concussion issue to deal with this week, with Jason Roy set for a final assessment on Thursday after passing an initial examination.

Ollie Pope has been called in as cover and would likely come in at number four, with Joe Denly moving up to replace opener Roy.

Root would not confirm the England XI regardless of Roy's fitness, as Sam Curran remains in contention after again being included in a 12-man squad.

Tim Paine wants Australia to fill the void left by Steve Smith as a team when they attempt to take an unassailable lead in the Ashes.

Australia can move 2-0 ahead and retain the urn with victory in the third Test at Headingley, which starts on Thursday.

However, they will have to do without talisman Smith, whose sensational series has been halted at least temporarily by a concussion he suffered when he was struck by a Jofra Archer delivery in the drawn second Test at Lord's.

Smith scored centuries in both innings in Australia's win at Edgbaston and made 92 at Lord's before being trapped lbw by Chris Woakes after returning following his head injury assessment.

He did not bat in the second innings and Marnus Labuschagne excelled as his concussion replacement, his 59 helping Australia save the match.

The first ball Labuschagne faced saw him struck by Archer, but he was composed thereafter and will take Smith's place after the former captain was ruled out.

Paine, though, does not want the burden of replacing Smith to be entirely on his shoulders.

"He's strange," Paine said of Labuschagne at a media conference. "He seems to enjoy getting hit on the head.

"We do it [replace Smith] as a team. Clearly, they're huge shoes to fill. We want our senior players to make sure we give that little bit more output, cover Steve the best we can."

Asked about Smith's reaction to his enforced absence, Paine replied: "He's disappointed obviously, but he along with the rest of the group understand why he isn't [playing].

"There's a strong medical process in place, Steve has to tick a lot of boxes [to make sure he's ready to play in the fourth Test]."

Much of the build-up to the match has focused on how Australia are to handle Archer, whose superb second-innings spell saw him take 3-32 in one of the most exciting Test cricket debuts of recent memory.

Paine insists Australia are prepared for more of the same at Headingley, adding: "We copped some short pitch bowling, guys have got plans in place and we've prepared really well for it, it's now about going out and executing.

"When someone is bowling fast and the crowd's up and about it's exciting. It's great for Test match cricket, the interest it's sparked in the last week, 10 days is great for the game. We're looking forward to the challenge again this week."

The skipper also indicated Australia will alter their attack, with the pitch not expected to provide as much help for the seamers. 

"We're obviously looking at maybe a bowling change," said Paine. "Whatever line-up we pick we expect the guys will be able to handle it [the pitch] or adapt to it quickly."

Tim Paine expects to see "the very best David Warner" in the third Ashes Test, believing the opener will thrive with the responsibility that comes with Steve Smith's absence.

Australia star Warner has endured a dismal series so far in England as he returns to Test cricket following a 12-month ban for his role in the team's ball-tampering scandal.

The 32-year-old has made just two, eight, three and five in his four Ashes innings as Smith, who was also suspended for a year, has done the heavy lifting to give the tourists a 1-0 series lead.

But Smith will be missing at Headingley this week due to the concussion suffered when he took a Jofra Archer bouncer to the neck in the second match at Lord's.

Warner, a senior figure, is among those under pressure to step up, and captain Paine foresees him doing exactly that.

"I'm very confident [Warner will return to form]," Paine said. "I've spoken a lot about the fact he averages close to 50 in Test cricket [46.9] and he's done that over a long period of time.

"I think with Steve missing this game, it might be the little poke and prod that Davey needs. He likes that responsibility.

"And my experience with Davey is that, when people doubt him and his back is against the wall, he comes out swinging. I'm expecting the very best David Warner this week."

England have confirmed their home international schedule for 2020, with Australia, West Indies and Pakistan set to tour the country.

Australia lead the Ashes 1-0 after the first two Tests and will return to England for a pair of limited-overs series next year.

They will face England in Twenty20 matches at Durham, Old Trafford and Headingley. Those will be followed by a trio of ODIs at Lord's, Southampton and Bristol.

The series will mark the first white-ball matches between England and Australia since Eoin Morgan's men beat the old enemy in the semi-finals of their victorious Cricket World Cup campaign.

England open their home 2020 season with a three-Test series against West Indies starting on June 4 at The Oval. West Indies beat England 2-1 in the Caribbean this year, with Joe Root's men having won by the same scoreline on their own patch in 2017.

The six matches against Australia follow before England take on Pakistan in three Tests, which begin at Lord's on July 30.

With the T20 World Cup kicking off in October 2020, a subsequent three-game series with Pakistan in that format should serve as valuable preparation for the tournament.

England round off their home schedule for the year with three ODIs against Ireland, the first taking place on September 10 at Trent Bridge. That series forms part of the new World Cup Super League, which will serve as the main route to qualification for the 2023 World Cup in India.

Jason Roy passed a concussion test but will be assessed again on Thursday ahead of the start of the third Ashes match.

The England opener was struck on the side of the neck while batting in the nets at Headingley on Tuesday.

He came through his concussion examination on Wednesday but England will wait until the day of the start of the Test before making a decision on his participation.

Australia star Steve Smith, the leading run scorer in the series, has been ruled out of the meeting with a concussion suffered when he was struck by a Jofra Archer bouncer in the drawn second Test at Lord's.

Roy played an instrumental role in England's triumphant Cricket World Cup campaign but has struggled on his first foray into red-ball cricket.

He scored 72 in the second innings in England's win over Ireland in July, but Roy has just 40 runs to his name in the Ashes and contributed only two at Lord's.

England pushed hard to level the series in a rain-affected second Test at Lord's and were given a new lease of life by Jofra Archer.

But Australia and their batsman came through a serious examination to keep their 1-0 lead intact going into the third encounter at Headingley.

Following that dramatic draw, Joe Root's men have renewed impetus and Aussie talisman Steve Smith has been ruled out, having been struck by a brute of a bouncer from paceman Archer.

Here, we look at the key Opta numbers heading into what is sure to be another gripping battle.


11 – Of the 20 times batsmen of both teams were struck on the helmet or body at Lord's, Archer was responsible for 11. Only one other such blow came from an England bowler.

8 – Australia are unbeaten in their past eight Tests against England, winning six and drawing two. The last time they put a longer Ashes streak together was 18 matches between 1987 and 1993.

1 – The tourists only need one more victory from the remaining three games to retain the Ashes. They last avoided defeat in a series in England was 2001.

4 – Peter Siddle has seen four catches dropped off his bowling in the series so far – twice as many as any other bowler.

459 – Travis Head has more runs in Test cricket than any other player in 2019, averaging 76.5. England would be well advised to target the stumps as four of his past five dismissals have been lbw.

42 – Stuart Broad has 42 Test wickets at Headingley at an average of 26.8. Three more this week and he will surpass the 44 achieved by Yorkshire great Fred Trueman on his own ground and become the most prolific wicket taker at the Leeds venue in the longest format.

2014 – The last time back-to-back Test matches in England were drawn.

7 – Seven of the past nine Tests at Headingley have been won by the team to lose the toss – a sequence that started with Australia's innings and 80-run triumph in August 2009. That was the fourth time in five visits to Leeds the men in baggy greens have emerged victorious.

2 – England's previous two wins at Headingley, either side of a five-wicket loss to West Indies in 2017, came by an innings.

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