Andrew Strauss believes Eoin Morgan will need to take time to consider his future as England's one-day captain in the wake of their Cricket World Cup triumph.

Having been appointed as skipper shortly before a shambolic 2015 World Cup for England, Morgan has overseen a stunning turnaround in fortunes that culminated with Sunday's dramatic final victory over New Zealand at Lord's.

A day on from that win, outgoing head coach Trevor Bayliss backed the middle-order batsman to lead the team in next year's ICC T20 World Cup, which will take place in Australia.

Former England captain Strauss feels much will depend on whether Morgan - an ex-team-mate of his at Middlesex, as well as at international level - has the motivation to continue after achieving his primary goal.

Strauss, who also served as managing director of England Cricket before stepping down in 2018, told Sky Sports: "There is no doubt that if he wants to carry on then he will have incredible support from his team-mates, from the ECB and from the nation.

"All he needs to do is reflect and think about what's next for him and what's his motivation and drive and desire.

"If he has got that motivation then 100 per cent carry on but if he hasn't then pause for thought, because the only reason that we won the World Cup is because he was so committed to what happened on Sunday. If that commitment is not there then it is a time for him to think."

Trevor Bayliss expects Eoin Morgan to want to lead England into next year's T20 World Cup amid discussion over whether he will remain as captain following their dramatic 50-over World Cup triumph at Lord's on Sunday.

England lifted the trophy for the first time as they claimed an incredible win over New Zealand, prevailing on number of boundaries after the scores finished tied following each side's 50 overs and then a Super Over.

The successful end to England's four-year journey to world supremacy on the ODI stage, the vision for which was laid out by Morgan after their humiliating 2015 campaign, has led to talk of the Irish-born batsman possibly stepping down as skipper.

However, Bayliss, for whom the victory marked his final white-ball game in charge, believes Morgan will want to stay on and try to guide England to another world title in Australia.

As England continued their celebrations at The Oval on Monday, Bayliss said: "There is a T20 World Cup coming up in 12 months which I am sure he will be more than up for. [But] that will be an individual decision for him.

"Morgs is the leader of not just the guys in the team but off the field as well. He is the one who has really driven this forward.

"I think the rest of the boys try and run through a brick wall for him and the effort that Ben Stokes put in yesterday was just an example of that."

Bayliss was not fully convinced he could bring England's dismal record at World Cups to an end when he was appointed four years ago, but the Australian will leave his post after the Ashes vindicated for a steadfast commitment to aggressive and positive cricket.

"I wasn't sure [when I started] but it was certainly a country with a long history of cricket and I knew that they desperately wanted to do better than they had been doing," Bayliss added. "[I was told] no stone would be left unturned in an effort to get that World Cup.

"It's justification for how we went about it for the last four years. At different times we have copped a bit of criticism but we had an end goal in mind and this is the result."

Ashley Giles hailed the roles of Eoin Morgan and Trevor Bayliss in England's Cricket World Cup win, adding he is in no rush to discuss the captain's future or to decide on the next head coach.

Skipper Morgan led hosts England to their first World Cup success after a dramatic final at Lord's on Sunday, with Bayliss watching on as he prepares to leave his role as coach following the upcoming Ashes series.

Morgan, now 32, is likely to be questioned on his plans going forward, yet Giles is giving nothing away.

And the director of cricket is also willing to be patient in appointing Bayliss' successor, keen not to distract from the Ashes against Australia, starting on August 1.

"We've not got to [discussions with Morgan] quite yet, but Eoin's been a brilliant leader of this team," Giles told Sky Sports.

"He was a crucial part of the turnaround in our white-ball form - as was Trevor Bayliss and Andrew Strauss. We'll wait to talk about that.

"For us, we move on very quickly - we have Ashes camp starting at the weekend. Hopefully we can get the boys home and get them some rest.

"Trevor was brought in specifically really for his knowledge of white-ball cricket, with that being his strength area. He's done a great job.

"Most of the time, he's horizontal, extremely laid back, and sets the right environment in the dressing room. I'm chuffed for him. That partnership with Eoin Morgan has been fundamental to us getting to this point.

"The same applies as before [with Bayliss' future]. We're going to wait until after the Ashes for any process.

"There's a lot of noise anyway - here and through the Ashes, too - so if we have to go to the winter with someone who's just a stand-in for the time being, we'll do that. We'll run a full process after the Ashes is completed."

Eoin Morgan hailed Ben Stokes as "superhuman" after he inspired England to Cricket World Cup glory in an astonishing final against New Zealand at Lord's.

Stokes rescued the hosts with a mature innings of 84 not out, putting on 110 for the fifth wicket with Jos Buttler (59), as England reached 241 all out to force a Super Over after the Black Caps had posted 241-8.

All-rounder Stokes then struck eight of England's 15 runs in the Super Over and was rewarded when New Zealand matched England's tally, but were beaten having scored fewer boundaries.

England were crowned champions in the most dramatic fashion, Martin Guptill run out by a combination of Jason Roy and Buttler when going for a second run off the last ball of Jofra Archer's extra over.

Stokes was left shell-shocked after Carlos Brathwaite took him apart in the last over to win the 2016 World Twenty20 title in India, while just 11 months ago he was cleared of affray following an incident in Bristol.

The New Zealand-born 28-year-old was the hero on Sunday, and skipper Morgan saluted the former vice-captain, who scored over 400 runs in a glorious tournament.

Morgan said: "To come through it is extraordinary. He's almost superhuman. He has really carried the team and our batting line-up.

"I know Jos and his partnership was extraordinary, but to bat with the lower order the way he did I thought was incredible.

"The atmosphere, the emotion that was going through the whole game, he managed to deal with that in an extremely experienced manner. And obviously everybody watching at home will hopefully try and be the next Ben Stokes."

Morgan added: "I have said this a number of times about Ben, I think a lot of careers would have been ended after what happened in Kolkata. Ben on numerous occasions has stood up individually and in a unit for us.

"He leads the way in training, in any team meetings we have, and he's an incredible cricketer. And today he's had a huge day out and obviously we are thankful for that."

Joe Root felt it was "written in the stars" for Ben Stokes to be England's Cricket World Cup saviour as the hosts edged an epic final against New Zealand by virtue of a superior boundary count.

Stokes' excellent 84 not out saw England equal the Black Caps' 241 at Lord's on Sunday, while there was still no separating the sides after the match went to a Super Over.

Alongside Jos Buttler, Stokes managed 15 for his team from the additional six balls and when Martin Guptill was run out coming back for a second off the final delivery of New Zealand's over, the home side triumphed having struck more fours and sixes.

It was redemption for man-of-the-match Stokes, who was smashed for four successive maximums by West Indies' Carlos Brathwaite in the last over of the World Twenty20 final three years ago.

"Unbelievable. Wow. Hard to sum it up. What a day, what a tournament," Root said.

"Everyone has done what's been asked of them, we've come through difficult periods, held it together and performed under pressure.

"It was written in the stars for Ben, he's been through such a tough time, I'm so happy for him, I couldn't be more proud and pleased for him in particular."

England captain Eoin Morgan, meanwhile, was thrilled to see four years of planning come to fruition after his side were dumped out in the group stage in 2015 – an elimination that prompted a complete overhaul of the team's white-ball philosophy.

"There wasn't a lot in that game - commiserations to Kane [Williamson] and his team, the way they play their cricket is really worth aspiring to and the example they lead is hugely commendable," Morgan said.

"It's been a four-year journey, we've developed a lot particularly in the last two years, we find it hard on wickets like that, like all good teams do. Sport's tough at times but to get over the line today means the world.

"I was being cooled down by Liam Plunkett, which isn't a good sign.

"The guys in the middle kept us cool, they're very experienced, the best in the world, it's calming at times, there's not a lot between the teams, so we're delighted to lift the trophy today."

New Zealand won the toss and chose to bat first in the Cricket World Cup final at Lord’s as both sides look to land the trophy for the first time.

A wet start in London saw the pitch covered early in the morning before showers passed to avert the danger of a significant delay.

The toss and start of play were nudged back by a quarter of an hour to 10:15 local time (09:15GMT) and 10:45 (09:45GMT) respectively.

Tournament hosts England, led by Eoin Morgan, are unchanged from their semi-final victory over Australia, and New Zealand also made no alterations to the side that saw off India.

This is a first Cricket World Cup final for England since 1992, when Graham Gooch’s team lost to Imran Khan’s Pakistan.

For New Zealand it was a chance to go one better than four years ago when they suffered a seven-wicket thumping at the hands of fellow tournament co-hosts Australia.

There are five survivors from that match lining up against England, with Martin Guptill keeping his place despite making five single-figure scores in his past seven innings. The opener is joined by skipper Kane Williamson, Ross Taylor, Matt Henry and Trent Boult.

Williamson backed Guptill to come good and said it would be "incredibly special" for New Zealand to win the trophy.

"But before those potential thoughts it's about playing some good cricket," he said.

England captain Morgan said he was not unhappy with the outcome of the toss.

"No, not at all. It was a bit of a 50-50 call. It's always difficult here at Lord's. With the overheads we were probably leaning towards a bowl but it doesn't really bother me," Morgan said on Sky Sports.

"Whichever side plays well will lift the trophy at the end of the day.

"It's a big challenge for us playing against an in-form New Zealand side."

Kane Williamson is not concerned about New Zealand being underdogs for Sunday's Cricket World Cup final against tournament hosts England.

Both teams are bidding to win the tournament for the first time in their history, New Zealand having been beaten in the final by trans-Tasman rivals Australia four years ago.

England entered the World Cup among the favourites having risen to the top of the ODI team rankings, but Williamson is backing his side to pull off an upset on Sunday.

"I think England, rightly so, deserve to be favourites," Williamson told a news conference when asked if his team are underdogs. "Coming into this tournament from the start, they were favourites and they've been playing really good cricket.

"But whatever dog we are, it's just important that we focus on the cricket that we want to play and we have seen over the years that anybody can beat anybody regardless of breed of dog.

"We are really looking forward to the occasion and, like I say, the end point and the result, there's a lot of time between now and that point.

"So focusing too much on it I don't think is a positive thing and the focus for us as a group is what's in front of us and we know you go into any match and you have to deal with a number of different things, whether it's different moments of pressure, whether it's different moments of momentum and we have to be prepared to deal with all of those again."

New Zealand are yet to pass 300 with the bat at this World Cup, with Williamson expecting a low-scoring contest at Lord's.

"I think turning up, most teams having played here before expected scores to be a lot higher than what we have seen," Williamson added.

"But the reality of it is that they have been quite tough surfaces and there's been surfaces that have aged throughout perhaps a match on one day, so trying to make those adjustments are really important and I think if you are focusing on what you need to do as a group and the cricket that you want to play, then making those adjustments like in the last game.

"I think both sides looked at the surface, thought it was a really good one, and thought perhaps 300 and something was what was going to be at play, but after 15 overs or so, having conversations thinking, 'This is really quite difficult and 300 looks like a long, long way away' so if we are able to perhaps achieve something a little bit more realistic on that surface, then that gives you every chance to win the matches.

"And we have done it on a number of occasions but we will have to be good at doing that tomorrow and surfaces at times have been hard to read, especially with the pre-emptive ideas what most teams come into the World Cup with, which is very high scoring and tough work for the bowlers. Bowlers have, I think, enjoyed themselves a little bit.

"So, yeah, tomorrow is a new challenge for each occasion where we will need to make those adjustments quickly."

Eoin Morgan will not yet allow himself to dream of lifting the Cricket World Cup as he believes England must improve again if they are to beat New Zealand.

England have found form at the right time at this year's tournament, beating India, New Zealand and semi-final opponents Australia in succession to reach Sunday's final at Lord's.

But captain Morgan is wary of looking too far ahead on the eve of the match.

"I haven't allowed myself to think about lifting the trophy," he told a news conference.

"Cricket, and sport in particular, is very fickle. If you ever get ahead, it always seems to bite you in the backside."

And while England were outstanding against Australia in the last four, winning by eight wickets at Edgbaston, Morgan expects a huge test from the Black Caps.

"I think we will need to [improve]," he said. "New Zealand are an extremely tough side, with a lot of experience, a lot of skill.

"They were the best side in the group stage and they improved, very similar to us, from the group stage to the semi-final performance.

"So we are striving to improve on our performance - no doubt they will."

England have at least found their flow with the three straight wins, with Morgan acknowledging the benefit of being left in a do-or-die position in the group stage.

"I think it has helped us because it lends itself to actually being more positive and aggressive and a bit smarter about how we play," he said.

"It's sort of been the last-chance saloon since Durham [against New Zealand], which has been nice in a way."

Eoin Morgan confirmed England have a clean bill of health going into the Cricket World Cup final against New Zealand and says his players are "relaxed and excited" ahead of Sunday.

Hosts England thrashed Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday to book their place in the Lord's final, although star opener Jonny Bairstow was a slight fitness concern after he appeared to tweak his groin running.

Captain Morgan described the issue as "not very concerning" after the Australia match and he was able to bring a positive update on the eve of the showpiece fixture.

"Yeah, everybody is fit, so that's good news," he told a news conference.

With their strongest XI available, Morgan says the team are in high spirits and will not shy away from the excitement of a World Cup final.

"I feel pretty relaxed. It's nice to be home. I'm also very excited about tomorrow," he said. "We're going to enjoy the game regardless.

"We're going to take in as much as we can - it's a World Cup final, we're not going to shy away from that. As long as it doesn't affect performance, we're going to try to take it in."

And having put in the hard work and felt the support of the fans, Morgan is now hoping both England and the Black Caps can put on a show.

"It means a huge amount to me and everybody in the changing room," he said. "It's a culmination of four years of hard work, dedicated and a lot of planning. It presents a huge opportunity to go and try to win a World Cup.

"From everybody around the country, the support we've had throughout has been unquestionable. As a team, it makes you feel incredibly lucky to be part of a team that has that sort of support.

"It presents another opportunity for both teams and the ICC to sell the game on a huge platform. It's two very strong sides, who hopefully produce a really good game of cricket.

"It's on terrestrial television around the country and various outlets online, it presents a huge opportunity for us to sell this great game."

When England and New Zealand met in the Cricket World Cup four years ago, Eoin Morgan and Kane Williamson had little influence upon the direction of an explosive contest.

Williamson dutifully compiled an unbeaten nine from 22 balls after a Brendon McCullum shellacking effectively ended the contest before he was called upon.

A year later, when McCullum stepped aside, Williamson took the reins as skipper of one of the most exciting sides in world cricket, ready to repeatedly make his mark.

The main problem for Morgan in being at the mercy of an eight-wicket defeat with 226 balls to spare, with no discernible means of turning the tide at any stage, was him already being the England captain.

Morgs way – tearing up the script of failure 

Previously a freewheeling trailblazer of a batsmen – a contemporary cricketer as his adopted nation struggled frequently and embarrassingly with the realities of the modern limited-overs game – Morgan was appointed two months ahead of an England World Cup campaign doomed to shambles.

His innovative, 360-degree strokeplay disintegrated into 90 runs across five innings during an ignominious group-stage exit.

Morgan was unable to stitch up reopened wounds from previous failures but, in tandem with Paul Fabrace and Trevor Bayliss, he ensured those scars would not be his own.

This England, Morgan's England, would play in their captain's image. A rollercoaster series against McCullum's New Zealand was the launchpad for a fearless approach where wickets lost or runs conceded were not to temper ambition.

Where previous captains unsuccessfully begged team-mates not to go into their shells, England version 2.0 had a skipper for whom shackles had always been there to break. Morgan was a leader by example, first and foremost.

Kane the run machine 

The example set by Williamson in that eventual 3-2 series defeat to England could scarcely have been better as he registered scores of 45, 93, 118, 90 and 50 – Morgan's own 50, 88, 71 and 113 before a final-game duck were similarly spectacular – and he took on captaincy for the World Twenty20 in 2016.

While McCullum's aggressive leadership had roots in his bludgeoning shot-making, Williamson the skipper instantly appeared every bit as shrewd and calculated as his unfailing deflections down to third man.

The Black Caps won four consecutive matches in India before a semi-final loss to England. Williamson led them superbly on the sort of slow, turning pitches they had previously struggled to negotiate.

Style and substance

Morgan grabbed the headlines with a record-breaking century against Afghanistan during the group stage of this World Cup, smashing a remarkable 17 sixes.

It was a desert island innings – the sort of performance you might pick as the one piece of cricket viewing to keep you sustained in isolation. Williamson's knocks do not usually fall into that category, although he is the batsman you would pick to make runs in any conditions if your life depended on it.

His only score below 40 in the tournament came when Mark Wood deflected a drive fortuitously back onto the stumps at the non-striker's end when the finalists met during the round-robin phase.

That body of work includes two centuries and a pair of fifties, the latter of which – a perfectly judged 67 against India as the roof appeared to be falling in on New Zealand's sodden Manchester semi-final – made a place at Lord's possible. Williamson is a sure thing.

England do not rely on the mercurial Morgan to the same extent. But whether Jofra Archer is tormenting opposition batsmen with laser-guided aggression, Jason Roy and Jonny Bairstow are ruggedly disassembling the opposition attack or Adil Rashid and Liam Plunkett are bending the middle overs to their will, everything England do at their best takes its cue from his planning and calm conviction.

Weathering the storm

Stepping out at Lord's on Sunday will feel sweeter for two steely competitors who know they had to tackle adversity to get there.

The group-stage wobble of back-to-back defeats against Sri Lanka and Australia saw England's approach and their captain's stomach for the fight questioned. At a crossroads, Morgan doubled down and the hosts took apart the three best teams in the competition one after the other.

Although it felt more measured than Kevin Pietersen's social media yapping about Morgan, former Australia captain Michael Clarke and McCullum both wondered aloud whether Williamson was too conservative a leader for a country whose recent successes came on the front foot.

When it mattered most against India, the 28-year-old judged everything impeccably, never missing a beat in a game that pulsed with tension.

The influence of their 2015 mismatch upon New Zealand and England's respective directions of travel since has been well documented but this time, far from being swept along in the noise and confusion, Morgan and Williamson's fingerprints will be all over every moment of this Lord's showdown.

It will be a triumph hard-earned and richly deserved when one side lifts the trophy they both desire most.

England will bid to bring 'cricket home' at Lord's on Sunday when they face New Zealand in the World Cup final.

The home of cricket will host a clash between two countries seeking their first ever World Cup triumph.

Eoin Morgan's England crushed Australia by eight wickets in the second semi-final, after Kane Williamson's Black Caps stunned India at Old Trafford in their last-four encounter.

Here we take a look at the Opta numbers behind Sunday's showpiece.

 

6 - Whichever team lifts the trophy at the weekend will become the sixth nation to win the World Cup - after West Indies, India, Australia, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

2 - England have met New Zealand in two previous ODIs at Lord's, the Black Caps winning on both occasions - by five wickets in 2013 and 51 runs in 2008.

548 - No New Zealander has scored more runs at a World Cup than Williamson has managed in this edition.

4 out of 5 - The team that has won the toss has lost four of the previous five World Cup finals. Australia's victory over Sri Lanka in 2007 is the exception.

275 - The highest successful chase in a World Cup final came in 2011 when India (277-4) beat Sri Lanka.

359 - Only one team has managed to score more than 300 in a World Cup final when batting first, Australia posting 359-2 against India 16 years ago.

1,029 - England (2,942) have scored 1,029 more runs than New Zealand (1,913) at the tournament, though they played an extra group game as the Black Caps' fixture with India was washed out.

100 - Morgan's men have been explosive in obtaining those runs too, scoring 100 more fours and 53 more maximums than their upcoming opponents.

3 - Jason Roy's return to the side has coincided with three consecutive century stands alongside Jonny Bairstow. There have been never been four successive opening partnerships worth three figures in England's ODI history.

338 - No bowler has produced more dot balls than England paceman Jofra Archer's 338. New Zealand seamer Trent Boult (320) is third on the list behind Australia's Pat Cummins (323).

England star Jason Roy has been fined after reacting badly to his controversial dismissal in the Cricket World Cup semi-final win over Australia.

The opener's stunning knock was ended on 85 when he was given out caught behind despite replays showing he made no contact with a Pat Cummins delivery.

Roy initially refused to walk, but England had no reviews left so he had no choice but to leave the field.

He did so in evident disgust at umpire Kumar Dharmasena's decision, with his reaction constituting dissent and a breach of Article 2.8 of the ICC Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel.

The 28-year-old, who admitted the offence and sanction, has been fined 30 per cent of his match fee and awarded two demerit points, but will be available for Sunday's final against New Zealand.

Eoin Morgan's side won by eight wickets at Edgbaston, having reduced Australia to 223 all out before completing their chase in 32.1 overs. 

Eoin Morgan lauded England's remarkable ODI revival after his side reached the Cricket World Cup final four years after a humiliating group-stage exit.

An eight-wicket thrashing of Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday underlined England's quality, which is a long way removed from the abysmal displays they produced at the 2015 tournament.

Back then they missed out on the knockout phase after losing to Bangladesh, marking a low point for English cricket in the one-day game.

But on Sunday they will contest a Lord's final with New Zealand, which Morgan could not have foreseen after their miserable outing in Australia and New Zealand last time out.

"If you told me after the last World Cup that we'd reach the final I wouldn't have believed you," the captain told the BBC's Test Match Special.

"It sums up how far we have come in the last four years. Everyone should take a huge amount of credit.

"Today was close to a perfect performance, right from the two bowlers up front. Chris Woakes and Jofra Archer bowled a hell of a spell.

"They put pressure on with early wickets and allowed us to stay on the front foot."

Speaking on the field, Morgan also praised the fans who roared England on to victory, marking their third triumph in a row after consecutive wins over India and the Black Caps pulled the hosts back from the brink of another early exit.

"I would like to thank the fans – we've had unbelievable support and Edgbaston has always been very kind to us," he said.

"Having beaten India in the group stages here we would've come here with similar confidence. The way we have taken momentum from the last two group games into the semi-finals is very important.

"We set the tone early and when we got on top we made Australia pay."

Chris Woakes was delighted as England demonstrated their class in an eight-wicket demolition of Australia to reach the Cricket World Cup final.

With figures of 3-20, Woakes' man-of-the-match display epitomised England's dominance of Thursday's clash at Edgbaston, where Australia were bowled out for 223.

Jason Roy (85) starred with the bat as the tournament hosts chased down the target in 32.1 overs, setting up a Lord's showdown with New Zealand on Sunday.

"I'm pretty speechless," said Woakes after England reached the final for the first time since 1992. "It was an incredible performance from the whole team.

"It started with the bowling performance and then the way they [the batsmen] knocked that off was outstanding.

"There were some nerves around this morning but that's natural going into a semi-final. The way we produced the goods just showed how good we are and where we are at as a team.

"It hasn't sunk in that we're in a World Cup final and hopefully we can go all the way.

"We were tipped as favourties so it was important to get to the semi-final in the first place, and then to win this in this fashion against this Australia side on the best ground in the world is amazing."

Australia won the toss and chose to bat first against England in Thursday's Cricket World Cup semi-final at Edgbaston.

The tournament hosts struggled badly when chasing against Aaron Finch's men during the group-stage defeat at Lord's, while they also showed frailties in failing to overhaul a moderate score in a shock loss to Sri Lanka at Headingley.

England captain Eoin Morgan confirmed his side was unchanged from the one that hammered New Zealand to seal a place in the semis, while Australia's sole alteration sees Peter Handscomb come in for the injured Usman Khawaja, as had been announced by head coach Justin Langer prior to the game.

There had been talk that Matthew Wade - called into the squad as Khawaja's replacement - may be selected ahead of Glenn Maxwell, but the all-rounder retained his place in the XI.

Not since 1992 have England gone this deep at the World Cup, while Australia are aiming to continue their perfect record in semi-finals, having progressed from all seven of their previous matches at this stage of the competition.

The victors will go through to Sunday's final at Lord's to face New Zealand, who sensationally defeated India at Old Trafford on Wednesday.

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