Buttler fined for sweary outburst at Philander

By Sports Desk January 09, 2020

Jos Buttler has been fined 15 per cent of his match fee for a sweary outburst at Vernon Philander during England's victory over South Africa in the second Test at Newlands.

Buttler was heard hurling expletives at the Proteas all-rounder on the final day of the tourists' 189-run series-levelling triumph in Cape Town.

The England wicketkeeper-batsman was found guilty of breaching Level 1 of the ICC Code of Conduct.

Buttler was also ruled to have breached Article 2.3 of the Code of Conduct for Players and Player Support Personnel, which relates to “use of an audible obscenity during an international match”. 

The third match of the series gets under way in Port Elizabeth next Thursday.

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    West Indies fast bowler turned respected commentator, Michael Holding, has over the years developed a reputation for being outspoken. He just tells it like it is. On Wednesday, prior to the start of the #RaiseYourBat Series between the West Indies and England, he was at his best delivering a powerful message against racism.

    The fast-bowling great, speaking on Skysports was asked his views on the #BlackLivesMatter campaign, delivered a poignant lesson on how education and religion helped brainwash the world against people of colour.

     “Education is important, unless we just want to continue living the life that we are living and continue having demonstrations every now and then and a few people saying a few things,” Holding said.

    “When I say education I say going back in history. What people need to understand is that these things stem from a long time ago, hundreds of years ago. The dehumanisation of the black race is where it started. People will tell you that ‘oh it’s a long time ago, get over it’. No, you don’t get over things like that.”

    He mentioned another recent incident in the United States that brought into stark focus, just how ingrained racism has become.

    “That lady in central park in New York (Amy Cooper). If she did not have in her DNA the thought process that she is white and this man is black and ‘if I call a police officer, nine times out of 10 he is going to be white and I will be considered right immediately. The black guy will have to prove that he is not guilty and by the time he has to prove that he might be dead,” Holding remarked.

    “She had that in her mind from day one and that is why she said and did what she did. How do you get rid of that in society? By educating both black and white.”

    Highlighting that he was not much of a religious person, Holding said that religion has brainwashed much of the world against people of colour.

    “As a young man I didn’t understand what brainwashing is; now I do. We have been brainwashed. Even white people have been brainwashed,” Holding said.

    “I go back many years, think about religion. You and I both are Christians. Look at Jesus Christ. The image that they give of Jesus Christ, pale skin, blonde hair, blue eyes. Where Jesus came from, who in that part of the world looks that way? Again, that is brainwashing, this is to show, ‘look this is what perfection is, this is what the image of perfection is.’

    “If you look at the plays of those days. Judas, who betrayed Jesus, is a black man. Again brainwashing people to think, ‘oh he is a black man, he is the bad man’.”

    He also spoke about how those recording history have deliberately ignored achievements by people of African heritage.

    “We all know who invented the light bulb. Thomas Edison invented it. Edison invented the light bulb with a paper filament; it burnt out in no time at all. Can you tell me who invented the filament that makes these lights shine throughout? Nobody knows because he was a black man and it was not taught in schools. Lewis Howard Latimer invented the carbon filament because of which lights continuously shine, who knows that?” he asked.

     “Everything should be taught. When I go back I remember my school days, I was never taught anything good about black people. And you cannot have a society that is brought up like that, both whites and blacks, which is only taught what is convenient to the teacher.”

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    Michael Holding, Joel Garner and Larry Gomes, three members of the squad which had dominated the world for close to 10 years had retired just over a year earlier.

    Other key players Richards, Gordon Greenidge, Desmond Haynes and Jeffrey Dujon had all passed age 30.

    Heading into the England series, the late great Malcolm Marshall was the most experienced bowler with 53 matches and that was more than the other pacemen combined.

    In fact, that was one of the biggest concerns for the West Indies going into the series as Courtney Walsh, Curtly Ambrose, Patrick Patterson, Winston Benjamin and Ian Bishop had combined for just 38 matches.

    Thankfully, for the Caribbean side, the tour lasted approximately three months and along the way they played 16 first-class matches, eight of which were warm-up games.

    They lost all games in the 3-match One Day International series at the beginning of the campaign but as time went on and conditions became more familiar, they improved, drew the first Test and then sped away with the series 4-nil as their unbeaten series run approached a decade.

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    The Barbadian was also well backed up by his “inexperienced” pace bowling support cast.

    Ambrose snared 22 scalps at 20.22 while Walsh and Benjamin each took 12 wickets

    Graham Dilley (15) was the only England bowler among the top five wicket-takers for the series.

    While Graham Gooch topped the batting chart with 459 runs, 7 of the top ten run-scorers came from the West Indies.

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    It took another seven years before West Indies lost a Test series, beaten 2-1 at home by Australia in 1995.

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    In 1988, a helmetless 25-year-old Phil Simmons was hit on the head by a delivery from Gloucestershire bowler David Lawrence in fading light at Bristol.

    He underwent emergency surgery at hospital and while he played no further role on that tour he did make a full and often considered miraculous recovery.

    32 years later, Simmons has the chance to lead West Indies from the coaching bench.

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    The list includes Dwayne Bravo, Kieron Pollard, Sunil Narine, Darren Bravo, Lendl Simmons, Khary Pierre, Amir Jangoo, Tion Webster, Akeal Hosein, and Muhammad Ali Khan.  They have also signed 18-year-old West Indies under-19 medium-pacer Jayden Seales, as well as carrying back Australian Fawad Ahmed and New Zealand’s Colin Munro after they had stints away last season.

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