Heat cut down Hurricanes after contentious Wade dismissal

By Sports Desk January 09, 2020

Matt Renshaw produced a controversial moment of magic and Ben Cutting starred as the in-form Brisbane Heat beat Hobart Hurricanes by five wickets in the Big Bash League on Thursday.

Renshaw tipped a big hit from Matthew Wade in the air before jumping from behind the boundary to palm the ball up for Tom Banton to take the catch.

There was a shrug of the shoulders from Renshaw, but Wade had to depart for 61 in his first match of the tournament and the Hurricanes went on to post only 126-9 at The Gabba -  Josh Lalor taking 3-21.

Scott Boland claimed 3-16 to give the Hurricanes hope, yet they were comfortably beaten as Cutting made 43 not out and Jimmy Peirson an unbeaten 23 to seal victory for the Heat with 10 balls to spare.

Darren Lehmann's side are up to third after three consecutive victories, two of which have come against Hobart.

 

WADE DISMISSAL CAUSES A STIR

Renshaw showed great athleticism and quick thinking to set up a simple grab for Banton, but Wade's dismissal sparked a debate over the rules.

A tweet from the official Lord's and MCC account cleared up any doubts, stating: "The key moment is when he first touches the ball, which is inside the boundary. He's airborne for his second contact."

New Zealand all-rounder Jimmy Neesham was among those to call for a rule change and Wade would no doubt agree, having been sent on his way after clearing the rope twice in his first knock of the competition.

 

BRISBANE FEELING THE HEAT AFTER BOLAND BURST

It was very much game on after the Heat lost four wickets for only 19 runs.

Boland got rid of Max Bryant for 28 and collected a further two wickets in three balls when he had Renshaw caught behind before snaring Joe Burns later in the ninth over.

The Hurricanes were given another major lift when Chris Lynn was run out following a mix-up with Peirson, reducing the Heat to 71-5 in the 11th over.

 

BRISBANE CUT TO THE CHASE

Hobart were made to pay for a lack of runs, though, as Cutting and Peirson completed a successful run chase.

Cutting's best knock of the tournament and a measured innings from Peirson got Brisbane home - the pair putting on 60 for the sixth wicket.

The powerful Cutting - who also took three catches - was dropped by David Miller but the damage had already been done at that stage and he struck Thomas Rogers for a third six to end that match in emphatic fashion.

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    When the West Indies were knocked off their perch by Australia at Sabina Park in 1995, the team’s performances, at first, gradually declined and then from about 2000, it plummeted to the point where the Windies have been wallowing in a quagmire of mediocrity.

    Since 2010, the West Indies have won nine Test series. They lost 20 over the same period. Counting the ODI losses would make the numbers even worse, so I won’t even get into that.

    What we have seen during that period are batsmen who lack the required technique to last an hour at the crease and toothless bowling because the bowlers are incapable of maintaining the required line and length and in many cases, seem to be bowling in the absence of a clear strategy.

    What I see are fundamental weaknesses in batting, bowling and fielding technique that leads me to believe that grassroots programmes are woefully inadequate.

    When I watch local U15 cricket in Jamaica’s high schools, I see kids wafting their bats as if hoping to make a connection with a ball that is more often than not, off-target.

    Like football, mastery of the fundamentals is essential. Back when the West Indies were kings, kids played cricket in the streets and through trial and error learned how to defend. They learned how the play the ball of their legs. They learned how to keep a bouncing ball down.

    Kids don’t play cricket in the street anymore so ways have to be found to get them playing in a format that aids development while still allowing them to have fun.

    I don’t think Kiddies cricket is the answer even though there is some merit to the pursuit.

    What is needed in the West Indies are programmes in each of the territories, similar to those that obtain in India. Coming out of these programmes are scores of eight, nine and 10-year-old players who have already mastered the fundamentals.

    Their style of play is already set, which means relatively little honing is done, while getting them to play at the very highest level. By the time they get to the under-19 level, they tend to be better than what we see in the Caribbean.

    There are those who will argue that the West Indies u19 teams have done well in recent World Cups. My response to that is if you look at the next lot of players just outside the World Cup-playing batch, do you find players who are anywhere near as good and could form a second XI, performing at the same level at a World Cup?

    From where I sit, the answer is no.

    Each individual territory needs to be looking at how they can improve coaching levels at prep and high school under a template that defines the West Indian way. By the time they get to the u-19 or West Indies ‘B’ level, they should be ready to kick the door in, not just stare and hope someone opens it for them.

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