India closing in on whitewash after Kohli & Ishant torment Tigers

By Sports Desk November 23, 2019

Ishant Sharma tore through Bangladesh's top order to leave India closing in on a whitewash after Virat Kohli struck a sublime as 27th Test century on day two at Eden Gardens.

India need just four wickets to wrap up a 2-0 series win, with the sorry Tigers 152-6 in their second innings - trailing by 89 runs in the historic day-night match in Kolkata.

Captain Kohli made a majestic 136 and Ajinkya Rahane (51) scored a half-century in India's 347-9 declared on Saturday.

Paceman Ishant added to his haul of 5-22 on the opening day by doing further damage with the pink ball, taking 4-39 to leave the tourists - who lost Liton Das and Nayeem Hasan to concussion on day one - on the ropes.

Mushfiqur Rahim made an unbeaten 59 at stumps after Bangladesh were reduced to 13-4, but they are facing another drubbing and it remains to be seen if Mahmudullah will be fit to bat on day three after retiring hurt on 39 with a hamstring injury.

Kohli and Rahane continued to build India's lead after they resumed in command on 174-3, just the one wicket falling in the opening session.

Rahane was the man to go after scoring a fourth consecutive Test half-century, slashing Taijul Islam - a concussion replacement for Nayeem Hasan - to Ebadat Hossain at point to end a fourth-wicket stand of 99.

Kohli was at his magnificent best, scoring freely on both sides of the wicket and he struck Abu Jayed for four boundaries in a row after bringing up his 20th Test hundred as skipper.

India lost a flurry of wickets after lunch, Kohli's imperious knock ended by Ebadat (3-91) after he found the rope 18 times to put the top-ranked side in complete control.

The Tigers' batting frailties were quickly exploited by Ishant once again after Kohli declared, Shadman Islam falling leg before - and wasting a review - in the first over before Mominul Haque bagged a pair.

Mohammad Mithun was rattled on the helmet by a hostile Ishant before he was taken by Mohammed Shami at short midwicket, done for pace by Umesh Yadav (2-40).

Senior men Mushfiqur and Mahmudullah showed some much-needed resolve in a stand of 69 prior to the latter limping off following treatment.

Mehidy Hasan - the other concussion replacement - became Ishant's ninth victim of the match and Umesh had Taijul taken in the gully by Rahane just before the close to leave Mushfiqur - who also copped one of the helmet - running out of partners.

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