Ashes 2019: Paine has no plans to call time on Australia captaincy

By Sports Desk September 11, 2019

Tim Paine is not planning to bow out as Australia captain in the wake of his side retaining the Ashes.

Australia retained the urn thanks to their 185-run victory in the fourth Test at Old Trafford, handing the visitors an unassailable 2-1 lead.

There is still plenty to play for at The Oval, however, with England needing a victory to avoid a first Ashes series defeat on home soil in 18 years.

Paine's captaincy has come under scrutiny at times throughout the tour, particularly with former skipper Steve Smith - who was replaced by the wicketkeeper following the 2018 ball-tampering scandal - having been in such inspired form.

But having guided Australia through a difficult 18 months, Paine is in no mood to relinquish his leadership duties, even though an Ashes win would ensure his legacy would be firmly intact.

"Not for me, not at the moment," Paine, whose international career was halted by a mixture of injuries and rivals keeping him out of the team, told reporters at The Oval when asked if he might call time on his tenure at the end of the series.

"I'm loving doing what I'm doing, and I think while you've got a job that you love you try and do it for as long as you can.

"I did miss a lot, I suppose, in the prime years of my cricket career. The positive of that now is that physically I'm in really good condition for my age and feel really good after Test matches physically.

"Mentally, it's a different story but it only takes a day to recover from that. While I keep enjoying it, I'll keep doing it."

The 34-year-old was asked if the end of the ICC Test Championship cycle in the middle of 2021 would be an ideal signing-off point, but Paine insisted he is not planning so far ahead.

"I haven't thought about it to be honest," Paine said.

"I haven't thought much past this Test match, as I've said in the last 18 months, I think it's foolish at my age if you do.

"I'm enjoying what I'm doing and whilst I can continue to contribute in some way, I'll continue to do it.

"I constantly talk to Justin Langer and [selection chair] Trevor Hohns about what might happen or how long I might go on for, but I think we're all comfortable and we're all on the same page."

Related items

  • Kohli hails 'great' appointment as Ganguly named BCCI boss Kohli hails 'great' appointment as Ganguly named BCCI boss

    Sourav Ganguly has been named the new president of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI).

    The legendary batsman was elected after a general body meeting on Wednesday.

    Ganguly was India captain from 2000 to 2005 and guided them to the final of the 2003 Cricket World Cup.

    He is sixth on the all-time list of Test run-scorers for India with 7,212, and his 11,363 runs in ODIs rank ninth on the international all-time list.

    "I congratulated him. It's great that he has become BCCI president," said India captain Virat Kohli.

    Wicketkeeper Wriddhiman Saha added: "I hope players will immensely benefit after Dada [Ganguly] takes up the new role.

    "He has represented the country for a long time and then went on to dominate Indian cricket first as a player then captain.

    "He can bring about a lot of improvements as he knows the game inside out. If something is not happening, Dadi can make it happen."

  • Ferguson to return for New Zealand XI against England Ferguson to return for New Zealand XI against England

    Lockie Ferguson will make a timely return from injury for a New Zealand XI in two Twenty20 warm-up matches against England.

    The paceman has been out of action since suffering a fractured thumb training in Sri Lanka last month.

    Ferguson is now fully fit and will face Eoin Morgan's side in a team captained by Colin Munro at Bert Sutcliffe Oval in Lincoln on Sunday and next Tuesday.

    He said: "The thumb has healed well and I'm looking forward to having a hit-out at Lincoln.

    "While it's obviously frustrating to be sidelined, it's actually been good to take some time to freshen up and be able to return with plenty of motivation and energy.

    "It's the beginning of a really big summer of cricket and it's exciting to be starting it against a quality England side."

    A five-match T20 series between the Black Caps and England starts in Christchurch on November 1.

  • Rugby World Cup 2019: No advantage gained from spying - Mitchell Rugby World Cup 2019: No advantage gained from spying - Mitchell

    John Mitchell wished New Zealand good luck if they want to spy on England ahead of the Rugby World Cup semi-final but says it would not give them an advantage.

    England head coach Eddie Jones claimed someone was spotted filming England's training session on Tuesday.

    Jones said it may have been a Japanese fan seen in an apartment overlooking the pitch, but admitted he used to spy on opponents.

    Defence coach Mitchell does not believe the All Blacks would gain anything from seeing how England were preparing for a titanic battle in Yokohama City on Saturday.

    "If that is what they want to do, and that is the way they want to prepare, good luck to them," the New Zealander said.

    He added: "We just happened to be training where there are apartments above our tiny two-metre fence, so I am not sure about what the use of the tarpaulins are.

    "The facilities have been excellent but it's an area where people live and there is the odd red light around. There was one up in the corner, which was a bit suspicious.

    "It doesn't really worry me. This game is so dynamic now so I don't see any advantage in spying on a team."

    Mitchell revealed spying is not uncommon at the highest level of rugby.

    "When I took over the All Blacks in 2001 we had a manager who was highly military and he loved surveying the whole area," he said.

    "To me, you can get too involved in it and create an anxiety in your group. There is enough pressure at this level without chasing around some blokes that might be in a building with a camera.

    "I was with Sir Clive Woodward when we were going for a Grand Slam against Scotland and we chased somebody from one of the papers around the corner and caught him in a hedge.

    "He was pretty unlucky actually but that was when the game was a lot different to what it is now. I've seen coaches spy, I've had other coaches spy. I've had mates spy as well, but I don't see any advantage."

© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.