Morgan still undecided over England future

By Sports Desk July 21, 2019

England captain Eoin Morgan insisted he was yet to make a decision on his future, saying he needed more time to consider what is ahead.

Morgan, 32, led England to their first Cricket World Cup title earlier this month after a dramatic win over New Zealand in the final.

With some uncertainty over his future, Morgan said he would take a break before making a decision.

"After every major tournament or challenge, I'll always sit down and say 'how does the future look? How does the next six months, year, four years look?'" he told Sky Sports.

"I actually haven't had a chance to come down off the high of the World Cup yet, so it's been incredibly difficult to make a logical decision and that's when I make my best decisions.

"Next week, I'm going away with my wife to get away from the game, in a really nice way. I'm absolutely knackered – physically and mentally knackered. I need a little bit of time away to consider everything."

The 2020 ICC T20 World Cup is just 15 months away, while England will defend their 50-over crown in 2023.

Morgan said he needed to decide whether he was the man to continue leading England through the period.

"It's a big commitment – not only to go to the T20 World Cup next year, but to commit to the next 50-over World Cup," he said.

"This last five weeks has taken so much out of me mentally and physically. My levels of fitness with my back have always been in question and it's not a nice place to be in as a leader.

"At the forefront of it will be 'can I take the team forward?'"

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