Virat Kohli made his T20I debut against Zimbabwe in 2010 and scored his first T20I fifty against Sri Lanka in 2012. Kohli continued churning runs in T20s as he scored 185 runs, including two half-centuries in 5 matches at the 2012 ICC World Twenty20. For his excellent batting, Kohli was named in the ‘Team of the Tournament’ for the 2012 T20 World Cup.

In the next T20 World Cup in 2014, Kohli’s continued to be in top form and played what he considers his best T20 innings in the semi-final of the tournament. He scored 72 not out in 44 balls and helped India get into the final by reaching the target of 173 runs.

 

Career Statistics (2007–present)

Full name: Virat Kohli

Born: November 5, 1988, Delhi

Major teams: India, Delhi, India A, India Blue, India Emerging Players, India Red, India Under-19s, Indian Board President's XI, North Zone, Oil & Natural Gas Corporation, Rest of India, Royal Challengers Bangalore, Surrey

Playing role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

 

T20I Career

Mat      Inns      NO Runs     HS  Ave       BF  SR  100       50       4s   6s   Ct   St

82  76  21  2794     94*       50.80   2021       138.24 0     24  258       76  41  0

 

T20 Career

Mat      Inns      NO Runs     HS  Ave       BF  SR  100       50       4s   6s   Ct   St

281       266       50  8900     113       41.20   6614       134.56 5     64  808       286       128       0

 

 

Career Highlights

  • Most runs all-time in T20Is, 2749, avg. 50.80
  • Player of the Tournament at the T20 WC in 2014 & 2016.
  • Most runs by an individual batsman at single T20 WC (319)
  • Most runs in IPL history (5412)
  • IPL player of the tournament & orange cap winner 2016 (record 973 runs)
  • 1st player to reach the 4000-run milestone in the IPL (2nd to 5000)
  • 82 T20I caps (3rd most for India)
  • 8900 T20 runs averaging 41.20

Jasprit Bumrah came to international prominence courtesy of an injury to Mohammed Shamsi, but he has not looked back since. The Indian team, at the time, desperately needed a death bowler, and Bumrah was it.

There are two weapons the paceman employ brilliantly, and it works just as well in T20s as it does in any form of cricket. Bumrah is master of the art of bowling Yorkers. With the Bumrah yorker, batsmen trying to earn quick runs at the death are faced with the added disadvantage of reverse swing, something he has a knack for finding, even with the limited movement of the white ball.

The slightly built pacer possesses a fast arm action and this has made his slower ball and other variations almost imperceptible.

While many cricketers have come to international cricket at the Test or ODI level and then adapted to the shortest form of the game, that is not the case for Bumrah.

Bumrah has gone the other way, using the Indian Premier League and his performances for the Mumbai Indians as a catalyst, he earned a place in T20 cricket first, before also doing the same with the Indian One-Day International team. Eventually, Bumrah would make his debut as a Test player and go on to show the kind of adaptability that makes for the best exponents of the T20 game.

In 2017, bowling against the Gujarat Lions in the IPL, Bumrah showed his skill in a super over. Given the ball ahead of Lasith Malinga, Bumrah successfully defended just 12 runs, against the might of Aaron Finch and the ultra-aggressive Brendon McCullum. He was at the peak of his powers. As a death bowler, Bumrah’s average is 7.06, which is quite remarkable.

 

Career Statistics (2013-present)

Full name: Jasprit Jasbirsingh Bumrah

Born: December 6, 1993, Ahmedabad (26)

Major teams: India, Gujarat, India A, India Green, India Under-23s, Mumbai Indians, West Region

Playing role: Bowler

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm fast

 

T20I Career

Mat   Inns   Balls      Runs     Wkts     BBI    BBM       Ave      Econ   SR      4w    5w    10w

50         49    1075      1195        59       3/11    3/11      20.25     6.66   18.2     0         0      0

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   Balls     Runs     Wkts     BBI    BBM     Ave    Econ    SR       4w    5w    10w

157     156   3480      4098       182       3/7     3/7      22.51    7.06   19.1       0       0       0

 

Career Highlights

  • #1 Indian T20I wicket-taker, 59 in 50 matches at 20.25
  • Most T20I wickets in the calendar year 2016 (28)
  • 183 T20 wickets taken at 22.51
  • Named in T20 XI of the year by ESPNCricinfo in 2016 & 2017

Rohit Sharma has distanced himself from comparisons to former India captain MS Dhoni which were made by Suresh Raina.

Speaking on the Super Over podcast, Raina likened Rohit's leadership to that of Dhoni, who captained India in over 300 matches across all formats and led the team to all three ICC white-ball trophies during his tenure between 2007 and 2016.

Though Virat Kohli succeeded Dhoni as India's skipper, Raina talked up Rohit's demeanour and described him as "the next MS Dhoni for the Indian cricket team".

When that was put to Rohit in an online question-and-answer session, the opener said on a Twitter video: "Yes, I heard about that comment from Suresh Raina.

"MS Dhoni is one of a kind and nobody can be like him and I believe comparisons should not be made like that, every individual is different and has his strengths and weaknesses."

Rohit, 33, has led Mumbai Indians to a record four Indian Premier League titles and has also captained India in 10 ODIs and 19 Twenty20 internationals, winning 23 of those 29 matches.

"Around him, players enjoy the intensity, they enjoy his aura," former India batsman Raina had said.

"When you enjoy the aura of a player, you like to be positive and I think that is what he is good at.

"MS Dhoni was brilliant. He [Rohit] has won more [IPL] trophies than MS, but they both are very similar. Both of them, as captains, like to listen.

"When your captain is listening, you can solve a lot of problems, you can solve the mental aspects of the players. So in my book, they both are wonderful.

"I have seen [Rohit], he is calm, he likes to listen. He likes to give confidence to the players and on top of that, he likes to lead from the front.

"When a captain leads from the front and, at the same time, he gives respect to the dressing-room atmosphere, you know you have it all."

Mahendra Singh Dhoni is arguably the greatest finisher of the modern era, possibly of all time. A very cool, very calculated middle-order batsman in both T20s and One-Day Internationals, Dhoni, has been a pioneer in the art of assessing a run chase. With incredible ability to change the pace of an innings, Dhoni’s performances and his leadership have helped him carve out a place in Indian history, winning the most of any Indian captain. On the way to that record, Dhoni also became the first captain to win all three ICC limited-overs trophies, winning the World Cup, Champions Trophy and World T20 in 2013.

But his leadership and performances at the T20 level did not stop at international cricket, as Dhoni also led the Chennai Super Kings to Indian Premier League titles in 2010, 2011 and 2018. He also won the 2010 and 2014 editions of the Champions League Twenty20 with the Super Kings.

 

Statistics (2006-present)

Full name: Mahendra Singh Dhoni

Born: July 7, 1981, Ranchi, Bihar (now Jharkhand) (39)

Major teams: India, Air India Blue, Asia XI, Bihar, Bradman XI, Chennai Super Kings, East Zone, East Zone Under-19s, Help for Heroes XI, India A, Indian Board President's XI, International XI, Jharkhand, Rajasthan Cricket Association President's XI, Rest of India, Rising Pune Supergiants, Sehwag XI

Playing role: Wicketkeeper batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm medium

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

T20I Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs    HS     Ave      BF         SR        100   50       4s     6s     Ct     St

98       85      42    1617      56    37.60    1282      126.13     0      2      116     52    57     34

T20 Career

Mat   Inns   NO    Runs     HS     Ave      BF         SR         100   50     4s     6s     Ct    St

317   283      117   6621      84*   39.88     4882     135.62      0     27    451   295   170   83

 

Career Highlights

  • 3rd most T20I runs scored by an Indian, 1617- avg. 37.60
  • 2nd most T20I caps by an Indian player (98)
  • Record for most T20 WC matches (35) and most as captain (33)
  • Captained India to 2007 T20 WC title
  • Most consecutive innings without a duck in T20s (84)
  • Most dismissals as a wicket-keeper in T20 WC history (32)
  • 6621 runs at 39.88

The delayed 2020 Indian Premier League season will begin on September 19, pending government clearance, with games to be staged in Dubai, Sharjah and Abu Dhabi. 

This year's edition of the Twenty20 tournament was originally due to start in March, only to be postponed indefinitely amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

With COVID-19 cases continuing to rise in the country, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) had already revealed plans to stage the entire competition in the United Arab Emirates later in the year. 

Following a video conference between members of the IPL's governing council on Sunday, a statement signed by BCCI secretary Jay Shah announced further details regarding the 53-day event, including venues, updated regulations and key dates. 

The final is due to be played on November 10 and there will be 10 double-headers during the round-robin stage, though a full fixture list is yet to be released.

The UAE has staged the IPL previously, co-hosting the 2014 season due to a clash with India's general election.

"The governing council also discussed the comprehensive standard operating procedures (SOPs), which will be finalised and published in due course, including the agencies to execute and deliver a bio-secure environment for safe and successful conduct of IPL 2020 Season," the statement read. 

"The governing council also reviewed the player regulations for replacement players for 2020 season."

The IPL governing council plans to hold a meeting with all franchises in the near future, while the proposals must be ratified by the Indian government. 

the Women's T20 Challenge will also take place in the UAE, with three teams playing four matches during the same week as the IPL play-offs. 

Rohit Sharma debuted for India in T20 internationals during the 2007 ICC World Twenty20 and was part of the World Cup-winning Indian national team. He is only the second cricketer to have scored a century in all three formats on the international stage. Sharma is the second Indian batsman after Virat Kohli, and fifth worldwide to score 2,000 runs in Twenty20 internationals.

Sharma has had one of the most successful and illustrious IPL careers ever. He debuted in the IPL in 2008. He was signed by the Deccan Chargers franchise, based in Hyderabad. His contract got him a whopping US$750,000 a year. Although he was selected as a batsman, he proved his worth as a bowler too.

 

Career Statistics (2007-present)

Full name: Rohit Gurunath Sharma

Born: April 30, 1987, Bansod, Nagpur, Maharashtra

Major teams: India, Air India, Deccan Chargers, India A, India Blue, India Green, India Red, India Under-19s, Indian Board President's XI, Indian Oil Corporation XI, Mumbai, Mumbai Cricket Association President's XI, Mumbai Cricket Association XI, Mumbai Indians, Mumbai Under-19s, Rest of India, West Zone

Playing role: Top-order batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Bowling style: Right-arm off-break

 

T20I Career

Mat    Inns    NO      Runs   HS       Ave     BF       SR       100     50       4s        6s            

108     100     15       2773    118     32.62  1998   138.78       4      21       245     127    

 

T20 Career

Mat    Inns    NO      Runs   HS       Ave     BF       SR       100     50       4s        6s             

328     315     47       8642  118      32.24   6463   133.71       6      60       763     361    

 

Career Highlights

  • Most-capped Indian cricketer in T20Is (108)
  • 2nd most runs all-time in T20I, 2773- avg. 32.63
  • 2nd Indian cricketer to score centuries in all three formats
  • Record for most sixes in T20Is (127)
  • First and only batsman to score (4) T20I centuries
  • 3rd highest runs scorer in IPL history (4898)
  • 8642 total T20 runs at an average of 32.24

Picked for the Indian squad for the four-Test tour against the West Indies in 2016, KL Rahul played in the second Test at Jamaica and scored 158, his highest Test score then.

In the process, he became the first Indian opener to score a century in his debut Test in the West Indies.

In the first match of the T20I series in the United States, he scored a century off 46 balls in a losing cause, the second-fastest ever and fastest by an Indian. He also set the world record for being the only player to score a hundred in his first innings as an opener in both Tests and ODIs.

Rahul set the record for the fastest batsman to have scored centuries in all three formats in just 20 innings surpassing the record of Ahmed Shehzad who took 76 innings.

He is the first player in T20I history to score a century when batting at the number 4 position or lower (110*). On July 3, 2018, Rahul smashed his second T20 International ton against England. He is also the first Indian batsman to be dismissed hit-wicket in T20Is.

 

Career statistics (2013-present)

Full name: Kannaur Lokesh Rahul

Born: April 18, 1992, Bangalore, Karnataka (28)

Major teams:  India, Bangalore Brigadiers (Urban), India Under-19s, India Under-23s, Karnataka, Karnataka State Cricket Association Colts XI, Kings XI Punjab, Royal Challengers Bangalore, South Zone, Sunrisers Hyderabad

Playing role: Opening batsman

Batting style: Right-hand bat

Fielding position: Wicketkeeper

 

T20I Career

Mat    Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50  

42           38           6        1461      110*      45.65     1000      146.10           2         11                        

 

T20 Career

Mat    Inns        NO         Runs      HS          Ave        BF           SR           100        50  

131        118        21         4076      110*      42.02     2908      140.16          3          33         

 

Career highlights

  • 1461 T20I runs scored at an average of 45.65
  • First T20I player to score a century when batting at number 4 position or lower
  • Fastest 50 in IPL history (14 balls)
  • One of three Indian batsmen to score a century in all formats (two T20I centuries)
  • 4076 T20 runs at 42.02

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has officially launched the inaugural ICC Men's Cricket World Cup Super League, starting with England's one-day series against Ireland.

Introduced to help bring context to 50-over cricket at the highest level, the Super League will be used as a qualification system for the next ICC World Cup, scheduled for 2023 in India.

There will be 13 teams involved – the 12 full members, as well as the Netherlands – and the top seven in the final table will automatically secure their place at the global tournament, the ICC confirmed in a statement.

All sides will play four series at home and away, with each consisting of three matches.

"The league will bring relevance and context to ODI cricket over the next three years, as qualification for the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2023 is at stake," Geoff Allardice, ICC general manager for cricket operations, said.

"The Super League gives cricket fans around the world even more reasons to watch as the drama of league cricket unfolds.

"The decision last week to move the World Cup back to late 2023 gives us more time to schedule any games lost due to COVID-19 and preserve the integrity of the qualification process, meaning it will be decided on the field of play, which is important."

Reigning world champions England will kick things off this week when they start their series against Ireland, the first of three matches between the teams taking place at the Rose Bowl on Thursday.

"We're looking forward to playing cricket again and to the ICC Men's World Cup Super League," England white-ball captain Eoin Morgan said.

"Given the situation, it will be quite different to the last time we played at home, when we lifted the World Cup at Lord's, but it's nice to be starting our journey for the next edition of the tournament. 

"I'm sure cricket fans all over the world will be excited to see white-ball cricket resume and we're looking forward to the challenge."

The International Cricket Council (ICC) says there is no evidence to merit launching an investigation into allegations that the 2011 Cricket World Cup final between India and Sri Lanka was fixed.

A criminal probe was launched in Sri Lanka following claims made by Mahindananda Aluthgamage, the country's sports minister at the time of a final won by India in Mumbai nine years ago.

Aluthgamage alleged that Sri Lanka had "sold" the World Cup, prompting a special investigation to be opened.

Kumar Sangakkara, Aravinda de Silva and Upul Tharanga were called in for questioning, but police this week dropped the probe. Mahela Jayawardene was due to be questioned but the investigation was dropped before he appeared.

The ICC on Friday said the governing body has not received any information to suggest there was any wrongdoing.

ICC anti-corruption code general manager Alex Marshall said: "The ICC Integrity Unit has looked into the recent allegations regarding the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup final 2011.

"At this time, we have not been presented with any evidence that supports the claims made or which would merit launching an investigation under the ICC anti-corruption code.

"There is no record of any letter regarding this matter sent by the then Sri Lanka sports minister to the ICC and senior ICC staff at the time have confirmed they have no recollection of receiving any such letter which would have led to an investigation.

"We have no reason to doubt the integrity of the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup final 2011.

"We take all allegations of this nature extremely seriously and should we receive any evidence to corroborate the claims, we will review our current position."

India have pulled out of tours to Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe because of fears over the coronavirus pandemic.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) released a statement on Friday confirming the team's withdrawal.

It comes after Sri Lanka Cricket had already announced the cancellation of the tour, which was set to include three ODIs and three Twenty20 matches.

India were scheduled to travel to Sri Lanka on June 24 and then to Zimbabwe for a three-match ODI series starting in August.

A BCCI statement added: "The BCCI is determined to take steps towards the resumption of international and domestic cricket, but it will not rush into any decision that will jeopardise the efforts put in by the central and state governments and several other respective agencies in containing the spread of the coronavirus.
 
"The office-bearers have been taking note of advisories issued by the government of India and the board is committed to fully comply with the restrictions imposed and guidelines issued. The BCCI will continue to study and evaluate the changing situation."

India have pulled out of a limited-overs tour of Sri Lanka that was due to begin this month.

The three ODIs and three Twenty20 matches that had been billed could now take place in August, according to reports.

Confirmation of the matches in June and July being called off came from Sri Lanka Cricket (SLC), with the national board citing coronavirus concerns as the reason.

An SLC statement read: "The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) informed Sri Lanka Cricket that due to the prevailing circumstances revolving around COVID-19 pandemic, the cricket series, which included three ODIs and three T20i matches will not be feasible."

SLC quoted a message it had received from the BCCI, confirming a wish to abide by cricket's future tours programme (FTP), provided health assurances have been received.

That BCCI message said it would need "to seek the advice from government of India and the health regulatory authorities before taking any decision for the resumption of cricket".

According to Sri Lankan newspaper The Island, India would be prepared to tour in August if they obtain governmental permission to make the trip.

Bangladesh are due to tour Sri Lanka in July and August for a three-Test series, but the Ceylon Daily News this week reported those matches were in doubt.

It quoted Bangladesh Cricket Board director Akram Khan as saying the "chances are very slim" of the tour going ahead in its current calendar slot.

The ICC has delayed a decision over the respective fates of the men's T20 World Cup and women's Cricket World Cup in order to continue exploring contingency plans over the next month.

Australia is due to host the men's T20 competition between October 18 and November 15 but the status of the tournament remains unclear due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, while the women's 50-over event is slated to take place in New Zealand from February 6 to March 7 next year.

Last month, the ICC denied reports a decision had been taken to move the T20 World Cup back to next year, although Cricket Australia said it was braced for the postponement.

Following an ICC Board meeting on Wednesday, the governing body said it will "continue to assess and evaluate the rapidly changing public health situation caused by COVID-19 working with key stakeholders including governments to explore how the events can be staged to protect the health and safety of everyone involved."

ICC chief executive Manu Sawhney said: "The situation surrounding the global pandemic is evolving rapidly and we want to give ourselves the best possible opportunity to make the right decision for the whole sport. 

"The health and well-being of everyone involved is our priority and other considerations fall out from that.

"We will only get one chance to make this decision and it needs to be the right one and as such we will continue to consult with our Members, broadcasters, partners, governments and players and to ensure that we make a well informed decision."

Tall and lithe in his build, Anil Kumble was not the quintessential, everyday spinner.

He produced no lateral magic from the surface as Shane Warne did, nor did he create ripples around the batsmen like the wily old fox, Muttiah Muralitharan. Yet he ended up with 339 ODI wickets, with the only spinners ahead of him being Muralitharan and Afridi.

In the process, he gained enormous goodwill amongst fans and his fellow teammates for being fiercely aggressive and competitive on the field, and unerringly composed and humble off it.

 

Career Statistics

Full name: Anil Kumble

Born: 17 October 1970 (age 49), Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)

Batting style: Right-handed

Bowling style: Legbreak googly

Playing role: Bowler

 

ODI Career: India (1990-2007)

Mat     Inns      Balls      Runs     Wkts    BBI      BBM       Ave       Econ     SR        4w  5w 10w

271       265       14496  10412  337       6/12       6/12     30.89   4.30      43.0      8     2     0

 

Career Highlights

  • Most successful bowler at the 1996 World Cup (15 wickets)
  • He picked up 337 wickets at an average of 30.89
  • He’s picked up 5 wickets in an innings, twice

There was not much dissension when a panel of experts selected India’s Mahendra Singh Dhoni to be the man they put forward as the Ultimate ODI XI wicketkeeper.

Dhoni got the better of players like Australia’s Adam Gilchrist, the Ultimate XI Test wicketkeeper, and Sri Lanka’s Kumar Sangakkara.

The clincher, for both the panel and the Zone, is Dhoni’s ability, not with the gloves, but to figure out what course of action to take in a run chase and largely come out on the winning side.

It was revealed on the SportsMax Zone yesterday that Dhoni has had successful run chases with him at the crease for India 96% of the time. Chances are if Dhoni is at the crease, India will win.

That was more important to the panel than the tremendous glovework of South Africa’s Mark Boucher, or the pinch-hitting ability of Adam Gilchrist. Those two are considered the greatest wicketkeepers of all time. However, the panel believes Dhoni is the greatest wicketkeeper-batsman the ODI game has ever seen.

More important than the panel and the Zone, are the Fanalysts, so says the weighting around the votes.

Fanalysts have 40% of the vote for who gets into SportsMax’s Ultimate XI, with the panel and the Zone, enjoying 30% each.

With that 40% of the votes, the Fanalysts have chosen to agree with the Zone and the panel for the most part. Yesterday was no exception.

In fact, Dhoni’s 46.29% to Kumar Sangakkara’s 17.14% of the votes represents the biggest margin of victory since the Ultimate XI began two months ago.

With that pick, the Fanalysts team so far includes Rohit Sharma and Sachin Tendulkar as openers, Virat Kohli, Brian Lara, and AB de Villiers as the middle order, and Dhoni as the wicketkeeper.

The Zone and panel, however, have gone with Viv Richards in the place of Lara.

This evening, the panel and Zone will be voting on the Ultimate ODI team’s allrounder, with Fanalysts already seeming to decide on Jacques Kallis.

Rohan Kanhai enjoyed a career in which he played on great teams from start to finish.

Maybe it is a testament to his ability that he was a mainstay for the West Indies during this period since the cluster of nations had been seeing a swell in the number of talented batsmen it had been producing.

Names like Sir Garfield Sobers, Joe Solomon, Clyde Hunte and Basil Butcher were just some of the talents in the West Indies line-up when Kanhai started his sojourn in Test cricket, and when that sojourn ended 17 years later, the Guyanese batsman had been joined by the likes of Roy Fredericks, Lawrence Rowe, Alvin Kallicharan, Clive Lloyd and of course, Sobers was still around.

Despite spending 17 years at the top, Kanhai’s start to Test cricket was not as convincing as his career would eventually turn out to be.

on New year’s Eve in 1958, more than a year after his debut for the West Indies, Kanhai had yet to make his mark, had yet to prove why the selectors had kept persevering with him.

In truth, he hadn’t done badly, scoring three half-centuries in his first 23 innings. But he had never notched three figures, getting as close as 96 in February of 1958.

In Kolkata, that was to change.

The West Indies had dominated India in the first two Tests of a five-match series but Kanhai had yet to build on some good starts, scoring 66 and 22, nought and 41 in his first four times facing the Indians.

To date, Kanhai had only faced England and Pakistan, with India providing a new challenge to his fledgeling career.

On New Year’s Eve, West Indies had chosen to bat but were in early trouble when Kanhai walked to crease. Medium-pacer Raman Surendranath had, the ball before, removed JK Holt caught for just five.

India threatened for an instant, as Sir Conrade Hunte was back in the pavilion for just 23, leaving the West Indies at 72-2.

Six hours and 42 boundaries later, Kanhai was still there.

Collie Smith had tried to entertain a partnership but he went for 34 to leave the West Indies 180-3. Not a terrible return, but India were very much still in the game.

Kanhai eventually found a willing partner in Guyana teammate Butcher, who scored 103.

Day one would end with the West Indies in a strong position at 359 for 3.

Butcher was not out on 87 and Kanhai had his first Test century, a double. He was on 203 not out.

The following day, Kanhai would continue to keep the Indian bowlers at bay, going on to score his highest Test score of 256 before Surendranath had him caught by Polly Umrigar.

The damage had already been done and an unbeaten century of 106 from Sobers along with Solomon’s fine lower-order stand of 69 not out left the Indians staring down the barrel of 614. All this and Jamaica’s Gerry Alexander, a wicketkeeper who could bat as well, had not even faced a delivery.

That 256, coming in Kanhai’s 13th Test, was a watershed moment. Afterwards, he would get over the three-figures hump 14 more times in his career and score 28 half-centuries to boot to end with a very healthy average of 47.53.

Like sort of a warning, Kanhai would score 99 in the very next Test, before scoring another double century against Pakistan a few months later.

West Indies sealed the series in that game, winning by an innings and 336 runs and went on to register a 4-0 win following a drawn fifth Test.

While Kanhai and co. batted the Indians out of the game, it must be said the hosts had a major problem with handling the pace of Roy Gilchrist, whose match figures of 3-18 and 6-55, ensured the game would end inside four days.

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