Steve Smith has been ruled out of the third Ashes Test between Australia and England following his concussion at Lord's, coach Justin Langer has confirmed.

Talismanic batsman Smith was struck on the neck by a Jofra Archer bouncher on day four on Saturday and retired hurt before later returning to resume his innings.

The in-form Smith, who made centuries in each innings of the first Test at Edgbaston, did not play at all on day five, though, after suffering with delayed concussion.

Marnus Labuschagne was called in as a concussion substitute and made a brilliant 59 as the tourists battled to a draw to maintain their 1-0 series lead.

Smith said he was "hopeful" he would recover to feature at Headingley, but any hopes of participation in Leeds were ended by Langer on Tuesday.

The 30-year-old missed training with the rest of his Australia team-mates before the news was confirmed.

Coach Langer was due to discuss Smith and the upcoming Test with the media later on Tuesday.

Smith is returning to Test cricket in this series after serving a 12-month ban for his role in the team's ball-tampering scandal in South Africa last year, which also saw him lose his role as captain.

He has been in sensational form in England, making 144, 142 and 92 from his three Ashes knocks to put Australia ahead in the series prior to his injury.

Steve Smith has been ruled out of the third Ashes Test between Australia and England following his concussion at Lord's, coach Justin Langer has confirmed.

Travis Head says there is "definitely a chance" Steve Smith will feature in the third Ashes Test at Headingley as he is looking "a lot better".

The influential Smith retired hurt in the first innings of the second match at Lord's having been struck on the neck by a bouncer from paceman Jofra Archer, only to return later that day.

However, Smith did not take part at all on day five after suffering with delayed concussion and his status for the contest in Leeds, which starts on Thursday, remains unclear.

Concussion protocol will see Smith closely monitored, yet Australia colleague Head is encouraged by the star batsman's improvement in recent days.

Although Head acknowledged "it will probably be taken out of Steve's hands", he believes his team-mate is recovering in good time.

"There's definitely a chance [of Smith playing]. He's feeling better day by day," Head told talkSPORT. "I know he was a lot better yesterday.

"He'll have a run around and a light training session [on Tuesday] and that's key. It's not about overloading over these next couple of days. We're keeping him fresh, giving him the best opportunity to play.

"He doesn't really need a lot of time in the nets. He'll want to, but it's about making sure he's fresh, his mind, brain and everything is fresh. He's got no more signs of that concussion.

"He's ready to go, he doesn't need any extra preparation. He's been batting beautifully and playing beautifully.

"I'm sure he doesn't need to do anything over the next couple of days, he can walk straight out and play and get the same results hopefully. Fingers crossed."

Smith's role in the Australia ball-tampering scandal last year, for which he served a 12-month ban, has seen him jeered by English fans throughout the series so far.

Head felt the crowd was largely supportive at Lord's and suggested the way the former Test captain has responded to adversity shows him to be among the very best.

"He showed over the last two weeks how classy he is," Head said of Smith.

"The booing and whatnot, there wasn't a lot of it at Lord's. The Lord's crowd was fantastic throughout the week. There were little bits and pieces of it.

"I think the way he went about it showed great character. The way he's played over the last two weeks has been fantastic, under high pressure - high pressure from himself, the importance he puts on himself.

"I think he's one of the best that has probably played the game and he's showing that at the moment."

Kane Williamson and Akila Dananjaya have been reported for suspect bowling actions during the first Test between New Zealand and Sri Lanka, the ICC has confirmed.

Sri Lanka ran out comfortable six-wicket winners in Galle, but players on both sides were cited on the match officials' report for possible illegal bowling.

Williamson, an occasional off-spin bowler, sent in just three overs for nine runs in the match, all in the final innings.

Dananjaya, meanwhile, was decisive in his side's victory, with a first-innings five-for putting Sri Lanka in control. He added a more modest 1-84 next time out.

The 25-year-old served a suspension late last year after his bowling action was reported in a Test against England.

Both Williamson and Dananjaya will undergo testing within 14 days but can continue to bowl in the meantime, as the second and final Test begins on Thursday.

West Indies skipper, Jason Holder, is still the number-one Test all-rounder in the world even as his side is set to take on the might of India on Thursday.

Holder became the leading all-rounder in the five-day game last January after scoring an incredible double hundred against England before going on to take two wickets in a game the West Indies would win by 381 runs.

Among West Indies pacers, Holder is the highest ranked at eight, with Kemar Roach second at 11th.

Shannon Gabriel is ranked a place below Roach at number 12.

The Test-bowling rankings are led by Australia’a Pat Cummins, while South Africa’s Kagiso Rabada is second, followed by injured England paceman, Jimmy Anderson.

The West Indies are not as well off in the batting rankings, with opener Kraigg Brathwaite leading the way at 36th. Holder’s contribution with the bat comes next with the all rounder standing at 37th.

Roston Chase at 41, Shane Dowrich at 46, and Shimron Hetmyer at 48 are next.

Those ranking are led by India skipper Virat Kohli, while Australian Steve Smith comes next at second after his Lord’s heroics. New Zealand’s Kane Williamson is third.

Tim Southee has been named captain of New Zealand for their Twenty20 series against Sri Lanka, with Kane Williamson and Trent Boult rested.

Williamson and Boult are returning home after the two-Test series, which the Black Caps trail 1-0.

Despite the absences, New Zealand will have plenty of experience for the three T20s in September, led by Southee, Ross Taylor, Colin Munro and Martin Guptill.

The Black Caps have opted to name three specialist spinners in Ish Sodhi, Mitchell Santner and Todd Astle.

"Following that amazing ride in the ODI World Cup, it's exciting to begin setting our sights on another world event [the 2020 T20 World Cup]," selector Gavin Larsen said in a statement.

"The series in Sri Lanka will be a challenging one against a team who are tough to beat in their own conditions.

"Our T20 team has been pretty consistent over the past couple of years and we're really happy with the power and versatility we have in this squad.

"Kane and Trent played an enormous role in our recent World Cup campaign and with a big summer ahead, we see it as a good opportunity to give them a rest."

The opening game of the T20 series is in Pallekele on September 1.

New Zealand: Todd Astle, Tom Bruce, Colin de Grandhomme, Lockie Ferguson, Martin Guptill, Scott Kuggeleijn, Daryl Mitchell, Colin Munro, Seth Rance, Mitchell Santner, Tim Seifert, Ish Sodhi, Tim Southee, Ross Taylor.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) is not taking seriously, an email which purported there was an imminent threat to the Indian cricket team currently in the West Indies on tour.

The Indian cricket team has already gone through three T20 internationals and three One Day Internationals in the Caribbean, with the first match of a Test series set for Antigua on August 22.

The BCCI have contacted authorities in Antigua regarding the threat and will be beefing up security, though the threat is being viewed as a hoax.

“We have briefed the home ministry and shared the email. The embassy in Antigua has also been contacted and briefed. The Mumbai police has also been informed and the security of the Indian team in the West Indies has been beefed up," BCCI CEO Rahul Johri had told Indian media.

Ben Stokes has told Australia they should expect no respite from England fast bowler Jofra Archer when the third Ashes Test begins at Headingley on Thursday.

The visitors' star batsman Steve Smith will face tests to ascertain whether he can take part in Leeds, having worn a vicious bouncer from Archer at Lord's.

The delayed onset of concussion symptoms led to Smith having to sit out an absorbing final day – his replacement Marnus Labuschagne also copping some Archer punishment before helping to save a draw after Stokes' superb unbeaten 115 put England in command.

"It's part of the game and a big part of Jofra's game, being aggressive, not letting batsmen settle. That bouncer of his is a huge asset and he's going to keep on doing it," the all-rounder told reporters.

"When someone takes a nasty blow, no bowler is going to say, 'I'm not going to bowl that again because I don't want to hit them again'. The concern is always there when someone takes it. But next ball, when you get back to the mark, it's [a case of], 'I'm going to keep doing it'.

"We've seen Mitchell Johnson do it to us, especially in 2013-14, but Jofra just makes it look so easy, like he's walking in to bowl. And I'd rather have him on my team than have to face him. He's a frightening talent."

Jos Buttler was fielding at short leg when Smith was felled by the blow to his neck, making him first on the scene to check his opponent's wellbeing.

Along with Buttler, Archer and Stokes were also team-mates of Smith's with the Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League.

"We've got a good relationship from playing together and so does Jofra," Stokes said. "I messaged him [that evening] and had a little giggle with him, which was good, saying, 'Jofra's a good shot to hit that pea-head'. I think he was in as good fettle as he could have been.

"I was leg slip when it happened. It just hit flesh – not one of the nicest things to see on a cricket field. Someone going straight down like that was a pretty scary couple of minutes for everyone out there. It was great seeing him get back up."

Marnus Labuschagne just wanted to "get up and try to act cool" after being struck by a short ball from Jofra Archer on the final day of the second Test against England.

After replacing the sidelined Steve Smith in Australia's side, in the process becoming the first concussion substitute in Test history, Labuschagne endured a tough Ashes baptism as Australia attempted to bat out for a draw.

Coming in with the score at 19-2, the right-hander was unable to avoid his second delivery at the crease, a rapid bouncer from Archer crashing flush into the grille of the helmet.

The batsman quickly bounced back to his feet following the blow and was cleared by the team's medical staff to continue his innings. He went on to make 59, a pivotal contribution as the tourists survived to retain their slender 1-0 lead in the series.

Asked what he was thinking immediately after the impact, Labuschagne said: "You get up and try to act cool.

"It was then about trying to refocus and make sure you're watching the ball again - I was watching that one pretty closely!

"You just want to stay calm and answer the questions [from the medical staff] properly. I was like, 'I know where I am, I'm good. Get off the field!'. There's a process now, but there was no way I was going to get off that field.

"You want to stay in the contest. Getting to play at Lord's is a pretty great experience, so you just want to make sure you're ready, listen to their instructions and follow them - that's the key.

"If you have to come off, it's obviously because you're not alright. In my case, I was feeling fine. I just jumped the gun a bit on the questions. I knew how many I was on - 'I'm on zero and that was a fast bouncer'."

It was a similar delivery from Archer that hit Smith on day four. Australia's former captain retired hurt and, while able to return to the crease to continue his innings later in the session, he was ruled out of playing any further part in proceedings on the final morning due to delayed concussion.

Archer claimed five wickets in what was an impressive Test debut, as noted by Labuschagne.

"He bowled really well, at times his length was really good, and he obviously tested us with the short stuff on this up-and-down wicket," the 25-year-old said.

Despite not being able to bat in his side's second innings, Smith has climbed up to second in the updated International Cricket Council's Test rankings for batsmen and now trails leader Virat Kohli by just nine points.

England have named an unchanged 12-man squad for the third Ashes Test following the dramatic draw with Australia at Lord's.

The hosts came up short in their bid to level the five-match series on Sunday, Australia reaching the close on 154-6 after being set an unlikely 267 for victory.

Jofra Archer capped an impressive debut with three second-innings wickets but England ran out of time in a game badly hampered by rain, meaning the tourists remain 1-0 up with three to play.

With the next Test beginning on Thursday at Headingley, the selectors have kept faith with the same group of players, Sam Curran named alongside the team who featured at the home of cricket.

Opening batsman Jason Roy retains his place despite managing just 40 runs in four innings so far against Australia.

James Anderson is once again missing but the seamer will continue his recovery from injury by playing for Lancashire's second XI this week.

Having bowled just four overs in the first Test at Edgbaston due to an issue with his right calf, England's all-time leading wicket-taker will feature in a three-day friendly against Leicestershire that starts on Tuesday.

England announced Anderson will be "assessed on an ongoing basis" ahead of the fourth Test, which takes place at Old Trafford.

 

England squad for third Ashes Test:

Joe Root (captain), Jofra Archer, Jonny Bairstow, Stuart Broad, Rory Burns, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Joe Denly, Jack Leach, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, Chris Woakes.

Australia's prime minister Scott Morrison described the booing of Steve Smith at Lord's as an "Ashes foul" and hopes the batsman can respond to his "hecklers" in the remainder of the series against England.

Smith was forced to retire hurt during the fourth day of the second Test at Lord's after being struck on the neck by a Jofra Archer short ball.

However, the right-hander returned to the middle later in proceedings, receiving a warm ovation from the majority of the crowd, though a smattering of boos were audible.

Eventually dismissed for 92 by Chris Woakes, the former Australia captain played no further part in the remainder of the match. Australia were cleared to use Marnus Labuschagne as a replacement for the 30-year-old on Sunday, with the first concussion substitute in Test history helping the tourists secure a draw with a gritty half-century.

In a post on Facebook, Morrison criticised those at the home of cricket who had jeered "champion" Smith on his reappearance from the pavilion on Saturday.

"A draw for the second Test but it was a total Ashes foul for the crowd at Lord's to boo Steve Smith," the politician wrote, as well as posting a picture of Smith sitting inside the famous Lord's Long Room.

"His performance on the pitch during his return to Test Match cricket in the UK demands nothing other than respect.

"He's a champion and has handled the events of the past year with a real humility. I'm extremely proud of Steve Smith, and it's not just because he comes from the Shire.

"The crowd could learn a thing or two from Steve Smith and I look forward to him answering his hecklers with bat and ball in hand to bring home the Ashes."

Australia survived in the final session at Lord's to retain their slender 1-0 lead in the series - the third Test starts in Leeds on Thursday.

Smith - who has scored 378 runs in the series so far - said during Sunday's play that he is "hopeful" of being fit to play at Headingley, though will only do so if "100 per cent fit".

Jofra Archer has shaken up the Ashes after living up to the hype on his Test debut, according to England captain Joe Root.

An intriguing finish to the second Test at Lord's was in store when England declared on 258-5 in the second session, setting Australia 267 to win or bat out the final 48 overs for a draw on Sunday.

It was the latter scenario which came to fruition as the tourists, missing Steve Smith because of the concussion he suffered following an Archer bouncer, batted out for a draw, meaning Tim Paine's side retained a 1-0 lead in the series.

However, in Archer – who returned match figures of 5-91 from a heavy workload of 44 overs – England have fresh optimism heading into the third Test at Headingley, with Smith's availability for an encounter that begins on Thursday in "serious doubt".

"He's come in and he really has made a massive impact, added a different dynamic to our bowling group," Root said at a news conference.

"I think [he] has given Australia something different to think about so it's really pleasing to see someone come in on Test debut and really shake up things and live up to the hype, even some of the hype that he put on himself.

"It's really pleasing to see and it makes for a very interesting last three games."

It was one of Archer's rockets that clattered into Smith's neck and knocked Australia's talisman down on Saturday.

Though Smith returned to complete his innings later that day, Australia announced on Sunday that he would play no further part at Lord's having shown concussion symptoms when he woke up.

Smith's concussion replacement in their XI, Marnus Labuschagne, then copped another vicious delivery on the helmet grille from Archer, who had sent back David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs.

Labuschagne survived that onslaught and went on to make a crucial 59, but Root feels Barbados-born seamer Archer can be instrumental as his side seek to retain the urn.

"He makes things happen when not many others in world cricket can," Root added.

"He's got such a unique action and way of bowling and natural pace which is always going to be in the game on any surface. When you've got that and the skill of the other guys around it, it makes for a tasty combination.

"It will make them think about what way they're going to combat how he's going to come at them.

"It's always nice when you're stood at slip and not batting against him. It's very different to the other options that we've had previously and have in this team, it's a different skill."

Steve Smith's availability for the third Ashes Test is in doubt due to the concussion the Australia batsman suffered at Lord's.

England paceman Jofra Archer's vicious bouncer struck the former Australia captain on the neck.

Although Smith returned to resume his innings on Saturday, Cricket Australia (CA) announced the 30-year-old would not play any part on the final day of the second Test, when his team batted out a draw.

To understand why Smith's concussion may not have been spotted during initial assessments, Omnisport spoke to expert Dr Sam Barke, medical director of Return2Play, about the protocol and the measures typically taken.

 

Australia team doctor Richard Saw asked Smith a series of questions on the field including, "Where are we playing?" and "Who bowled the previous over?" What can the medical staff ascertain from this?

In the immediate aftermath you want to know how the player's feeling and then look at their orientation and memory, so asking those simple questions is just to see if they are responding correctly.

The doctor and physio will know the player and they can try and work out whether the player's responding correctly in a structured way.

CA said Smith "passed the CogSport and SCAT5 assessments" when he came off the pitch, so why was the concussion not spotted then?

The key to those tests is there is not really a pass-fail situation, it's just evidence building. Along with how the player is responding, how they're feeling and their symptoms, we do these tests to gather as much evidence as possible to try and work out whether the concussion has happened.

Unfortunately, there is not a 100 per cent test at the moment for concussion. It's adding all those pieces of evidence together to try and be as sure as we can.

Not infrequently we end up with situations like we had with Steve Smith where all the evidence from those tests has said, 'No, we don't think a concussion has happened'. Then further down the line symptoms start to come on.

Smith returned, misjudged a delivery and was given out lbw – later reviewing that decision when it clearly appeared he was out. Some people have said it was obvious from those acts that he was concussed - do you agree?

Being struck by a ball at that speed is quite a shocking incident that's going to be quite painful. Often people say, 'He clearly didn't look right'. But if you're in pain and you've had a shocking incident, you're not going to look right anyway.

That's not necessarily the same as concussion.

It was revealed today that Smith suffered a "delayed concussion response" – what is that?

The concussion itself hasn't been delayed. He had concussion from moment one. It's that he wasn't showing any signs or symptoms that concern that until now.

In my experience, the vast majority of time players do have some symptoms at the immediate point of injury and then they go away very, very quickly. It may have been by the time they got out there he was feeling absolutely fine.

So it looks like the Australia medical staff actually followed all the procedures correctly?

We reckon that probably about 10-to-20 per cent of concussions have that delay in onset.

As an outsider, it looks like everything's been done correctly and the right decisions have been made at every point, and he unfortunately fits into that small category of players that look fine at the time and then go on to develop symptoms further down the line.

CA said Smith is a "serious doubt" for the third Test, which begins on Thursday, and that per its concussion policy, he must not play or train until at least 24 hours after he has been cleared by the doctor. What is the process for a player returning to their sport and why do medics have to be careful?

You shouldn't be doing any activity until your symptoms have settled. In professional rugby they say you have to be 24 hours symptom-free before you start doing any sort of exercise. The theory is most people start to feel well when they do absolutely nothing and we want to see whether any symptoms come back with exertion and mental strain, so you gradually start to introduce exercise.

The big thing about concussion and the way you manage it, is the risk comes from further injury, not the initial injury. The risks from a one-off knock that's treated well are almost non-existent, but while the brain's still recovering, if it takes further knocks, that's when risks happen.

In the NFL, independent doctors are used to assess whether players have suffered a concussion. Do you think cricket should adopt a similar policy?

There's pros and cons to the argument. There are benefits of the medical staff knowing the players and being able to tell whether they are behaving differently. Independent doctors wouldn't know those nuances.

The vast majority of doctors make their calls that are in the best interests of an individual player rather than the team. They're more likely to be cautious than they ever have been.

I'm sure the team doctors are trying to make the right decision for the player and I doubt an independent doctor would have made a different decision in this case. The protocols seemed to have been followed correctly.

Australia captain Tim Paine lauded Marnus Labuschagne's commitment to the Ashes cause as Steve Smith's concussion replacement produced a gritty half-century in his side's draw with England.

Paine's team were set 267 to win inside 48 overs on the final day at Lord's after the hosts declared on 258-5 following a century from Ben Stokes (115 not out).

However, they were more concerned with batting out the day when Jofra Archer swiftly removed David Warner and Usman Khawaja to bring Labuschagne to the crease.

The 25-year-old was only thrust into the action as the first concussion substitute in Test history after Smith withdrew having been struck on the neck on Saturday by a bouncer from Archer, who then delivered a 91.6 miles-per-hour rocket that flew into Labuschagne's helmet grille and knocked him to the ground.

After receiving treatment on the field, Labuschagne went on to make a valuable 59, sharing an 85-run stand with Travis Head (42 not out) that took the game beyond England's reach – Australia eventually finishing with 154-6 to retain their 1-0 series lead.

"[It was] really pleasing for us to see him do that, particularly after the second ball he copped," Paine, speaking to Sky Sports, said of Labuschagne. 

"To get 150 kilometres per hour in the face and be able to stand up and play the way he did, for such a young player in Test cricket, was fantastic. Travis Head was the same."

Smith had returned to bat on Saturday following assessment from Australia's medical staff, yet it was confirmed on the final day that he would play no further part in the Test having displayed concussion symptoms in the morning.

Australia have said it is unlikely that their talismanic batsman will feature in the third Test, which begins at Headingley on Thursday.

"He's okay," Paine revealed.

"Obviously it was a really nasty knock. He felt okay yesterday and then, as concussions tend to be, [the symptoms were] delayed. He woke up, not feeling at his best today, so the decision was made to leave him out."

Asked whether he was happy that Smith was able to return on Saturday, Paine added: "I'm no doctor but we've got some professionals behind the scenes that make those decisions.

"Steve passed all his tests [on Saturday], was feeling okay. He deteriorated a little bit overnight, he retested, they weren't as good this morning so the medical professionals made that call.

"He will need to improve [to play at Headingley], there's no doubt about that, but hopefully for our sake he does improve in the next few days."

Australia overcame Steve Smith's absence and survived another venomous spell from Jofra Archer to draw the second Test with England and retain their slender advantage in the Ashes.

An intriguing, rain-affected encounter at Lord's concluded with neither side able to forge a positive result, despite England bidding to force the issue when declaring on 258-5 in the second session after Ben Stokes (115 not out) had posted a century.

Joe Root's attack had enough incentive with 48 overs remaining, while a target of 267 was also encouraging for the tourists, even if Smith was unavailable having displayed concussion symptoms on Sunday after copping an Archer bouncer on the third day.

Archer (3-32) dismissed David Warner and Usman Khawaja inside the opening six overs, but Smith's concussion replacement Marnus Labuschagne's gritty half-century effectively ended England's hopes, despite Jack Leach (3-37) striking with back-to-back deliveries and Joe Denly's brilliant catch, as Australia ended on 154-6.

Rain prevented play from starting for 70 minutes, Stokes and Jos Buttler (31) continuing their fifth-wicket stand in the first session to increase England's lead to 165.

Buttler top-edged Pat Cummins (3-35) to Josh Hazlewood at long leg after lunch before Stokes, then on 55, survived a review following an lbw appeal from Nathan Lyon.

Alongside Jonny Bairstow (30 not out), Stokes pushed on, dispatching Lyon over the ropes from successive deliveries as the advantage increased past 200.

A single to square leg gave Stokes his seventh Test century and Root called his batsmen in at the end of the following over to give Archer and his bowling colleagues an opportunity to level the series.

Archer provided early optimism when he snared Warner (5), who prodded to Rory Burns at gully to continue his dreadful Ashes, and then drew the edge of Khawaja (2), bringing Labuschagne, the first concussion substitute in Test history, to the crease.

There was no gentle introduction to Archer's searing speed as Labuschagne was caught flush on the helmet grille from his second delivery, a 91.6mph rocket that knocked him off his feet before he bolted back up.

Cameron Bancroft (16) was trapped in front by Leach but Labuschagne and Travis Head put on 85, with second slip Jason Roy shelling a chance to remove the latter when the alliance was worth 49.

Labuschagne (59) evntually fell in controversial circumstances, Root diving forward at midwicket to take a catch and benefitting from a soft signal of out when replays proved inconclusive.

As he walked off, the batsman expressed his disapproval to England's captain, whose team were soon celebrating again when Matthew Wade picked out short leg from Leach's next ball.

That gave the spinner three wickets - and Archer matched that total when Denly produced a fantastic one-handed catch to remove Tim Paine - but Head (42 not out) and Cummins (1 not out) ensured Australia held on.

Page 1 of 176
© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.