Azhar Mahmood is disappointed he was not invited to meet the committee of the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) before his tenure as bowling coach was ended, but says he is in demand as he eyes a new challenge.

The PCB last week announced a revamp of the coaching staff, with head coach Mickey Arthur, bowling coach Mahmood, batting coach Grant Flower and trainer Grant Luden leaving at the end of their contracts.

Arthur and captain Sarfraz Ahmed met the committee before the decision was made over whether the coaching staff would be offered new deals, yet former Pakistan all-rounder Mahmood was not given the opportunity to state his case to stay on.

The former Pakistan all-rounder felt he should have been allowed to represent himself, but left the role with his head held high two years after playing a big part in the ICC Champions Trophy triumph in England.

Mahmood told Omnisport: "We had some wonderful times. There were a lot of ups and downs in that two-and-a-half-year period, but I worked really hard with this young group of bowlers.

"I would have liked to have been able to represent myself in front of the committee before the decision over contracts was made, but I can move on with dignity and pride over what I achieved.

"I believe I've done a really good job with these guys and they have the potential to become world-class bowlers, so I wish them all the luck.

"Initially I got a two-year contract, which they asked me to extend until after the World Cup. Now it's time to move on and grow further as a coach.

"My aim was to be there and give my best to the country and to the players, I certainly feel I did that.

"Let's see where I end up next. Now people know I'm available, I have a lot of interest coming my way so I need to work out which is the best for my future.

"Even when I was doing the job with Pakistan I got a job offer from Surrey and now people know I am available, there has been more interest."

Azhar Mahmood says Mickey Arthur would be a great choice to succeed England head coach Trevor Bayliss.

Arthur is seeking a new challenge after it was announced on Wednesday that he will not stay on as Pakistan head coach.

Bowling coach Mahmood, batting coach Grant Flower and trainer Grant Luden also departed this week after their contracts expired.

The vastly experienced Arthur is reportedly a contender to replace Bayliss when the Ashes series against Australia ends next month.

Mahmood believes Arthur could be a resounding success if he lands the job and the former Pakistan all-rounder - who lives in England - would relish the opportunity to work with the South African again.

He told Omnisport: "Mickey has served South Africa, he's served Australia. He's been around for a while, so why not, I think he would do a great job

"I'd love to work with Mickey, we had a great relationship and if he becomes head coach and I had the opportunity to stay and work in England, you can't ask for anything more than that."

Mahmood added: "Mickey is very passionate, very emotional. He does things with his heart 100 per cent, whatever he does. I had a great time working with him, I learned a lot from him and I think he was the right man for Pakistan.

"Unfortunately, according to the pundits, we didn't produce, but there are issues with the fitness culture of players in Pakistan, there are a lot of unfit players. Our fielding, batting and bowling improved. People have to be given time, you can't produce overnight. 

"Throughout the period they [the Pakistan Cricket Board] never decided on a captain full-time, that was a problem."

Mahmood said he is open to opportunities in international and domestic cricket.

"I'm looking at my options, it's good to have a little bit of a break but I've already had offers, my phone has been ringing a lot and that was also the case while I was doing the job with Pakistan," he said.

"I have a lot to offer, I played one-day cricket and have been involved in the T20 format all over the world. 

"I would love to work in a capacity where I can pass on my huge experience, whether that be in domestic cricket in England so I can spend more time with my family, while also possibly working in tournaments in other countries.

"If an international opportunity comes up, then let's see. I am open to everything right now. People know I am available now so there is a lot of interest, I just need to work out which is best for my future."

Pakistan duo Shoaib Malik and Mohammad Hafeez have lost their central contracts for the 2019-20 international campaign.

The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) on Thursday announced the list of centrally contracted players has been reduced from 33 to 19.

Batsman Babar Azam, captain Sarfraz Ahmed and spinner Yasir Shah are the only three to be given a top-level Category A deal.

Shoaib and Hafeez were overlooked a day after it was announced head coach Mickey Arthur would depart his role along with bowling coach Azhar Mahmood, batting coach Grant Flower and trainer Grant Luden.

Experienced all-rounders Shoaib and Hafeez will still be available for selection in a new era for Pakistan.

PCB managing director Wasim Khan said: "I want to congratulate all those who have been offered central contracts for the next season.

"We have significantly increased the financial value of the 2019-20 retainers across each category. This is over and above what had been agreed in the current agreement, which is due to run until 2021.

"The PCB have set high standards and targets in its strategic plan for the upcoming season. We want to attach a high value to receiving a central contract. We have complete faith and confidence that these players will set up and produce on-field performances that will help us collectively achieve our objectives and targets."

The contracts run from August 1 2019 to June 30 2020, the PCB said, with Pakistan playing Tests and limited-overs matches against Sri Lanka, Australia and Bangladesh in that period.

 

Pakistan's centrally contracted players for 2019-20:

Category A – Babar Azam, Sarfraz Ahmed, Yasir Shah

Category B – Asad Shafiq, Azhar Ali, Haris Sohail, Imam-ul-Haq, Mohammad Abbas, Shadab Khan, Shaheen Afridi, Wahab Riaz

Category C – Abid Ali, Hasan Ali, Fakhar Zaman, Imad Wasim, Mohammad Amir, Mohammad Rizwan, Shan Masood, Usman Shinwari

Mickey Arthur's tenure as Pakistan head coach has come to an end after his contract was not renewed.

Arthur masterminded Pakistan's ICC Champions Trophy triumph in 2017, just over a year after replacing Waqar Younis.

The Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) on Wednesday announced the South African will move on in an overhaul of the coaching staff.

Bowling coach Azhar Mahmood, batting coach Grant Flower and trainer Grant Luden have also departed.

Pakistan seamer Mohammad Amir has retired from Test cricket at the age of 27.

The left-armer has played 36 Tests from his debut in July 2009 but, 10 years on, he has decided to quit his international career in the longest format.

Amir was handed a five-year ban and jailed in 2011 for his part in a spot-fixing scandal after bowling deliberate no-balls against England, returning to international action against New Zealand in January 2016.

He will focus on limited-overs matches and explained this was the reason for his early Test retirement.

"It has been an honour to represent Pakistan in the pinnacle and traditional format of the game," Amir said in a statement.

"I, however, have decided to move away from the longer version so I can concentrate on white-ball cricket.

"Playing for Pakistan remains my ultimate desire and objective, and I will try my best to be in the best physical shape to contribute in the team's upcoming challenges, including next year's T20 World Cup.

"It has not been an easy decision to make and I have been thinking about this for some time.

"But with the World Test Championship commencing shortly, and Pakistan boasting some very exciting young fast bowlers, it is appropriate that I call on my time in Test cricket so that the selectors can plan accordingly."

Pakistan Cricket Board managing director Wasim Khan added: "Amir has been one of the most exciting and talented left-arm fast bowlers in Test cricket in recent times.

"He overcame adversity as a young cricketer and came back stronger not only as a cricketer but also as a better human being.

"His skill, on the field, and his personality will be missed in the dressing room in the longer format.

"However, we respect his decision and look forward to him continuing to play an integral role in white ball cricket for Pakistan."

Amir claimed 119 wickets and scored 751 runs in his Test career, taking 6-44 in his best bowling innings against West Indies in 2017.

Pakistan will play their World Test Championship opener against Sri Lanka in October.

Inzamam-ul-Haq will step down as Pakistan's chief selector when his contract expires at the end of the month, he has announced.

The former batting great took on the role in 2016 after quitting as Afghanistan coach, overseeing success in the 2017 ICC Champions Trophy.

However, Inzamam has decided to move on following Pakistan's unsuccessful Cricket World Cup campaign, which saw them fall just short of the semi-finals.

"After more than three years as chair of the Pakistan men's selection committee, I have decided not to seek a renewal of my contract," he told a news conference.

"With the ICC World Test Championship, due to get underway in September, the ICC T20 World Cup in 2020 and the ICC Men's Cricket World Cup 2023, I believe it is the right time for the Pakistan Cricket Board to appoint a new chief selector who can bring new ideas and fresh thinking.

"I spoke to PCB chairman Ehsan Mani and managing director Wasim Khan on Monday and conveyed my decision to them separately.

"I also thanked them for backing and supporting the selection committee since taking over the reins of Pakistan cricket.

"The Pakistan cricket team has come a long way since the departures of stalwarts like Misbah-ul-Haq and Younus Khan in May 2017 and is now destined for improved results as the youngsters have grown in experience and stature.

"They are now ready to excel and perform consistently across the three formats."

As well as backing Pakistan to enjoy success in his absence, Inzamam also acknowledged he may have made mistakes during his time in charge.

"It has been a pleasure to see these players grow and make names for themselves in international cricket," he said.

"I will follow their progress with interest because I firmly believe these players have all the ingredients to take the Pakistan cricket team to greater heights.

"The team could have performed better during my time than the results reflect and I may have inadvertently overlooked some potentially deserving players, but I have always had the best interests of Pakistan cricket foremost in my heart.

"I hope the passionate Pakistan cricket fans will understand and can see this in my decisions."

The Cricket World Cup group stage is over and the build-up to the semi-finals is under way.

Group winners India will take on New Zealand at Old Trafford on Tuesday, with hosts England facing rivals Australia at Edgbaston two days later.

With the feast of cricket coming towards its conclusion, we take a look back at some of the stats from the first round with the help of Opta.

 

BATSMEN

Most runs

1. Rohit Sharma (India) 647
2. David Warner (Australia) 638
3. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 606
4. Aaron Finch (Australia) 507
5. Joe Root (England) 500

Batting averages

1. Kane Williamson (New Zealand) 96.20
2. Rohit Sharma (India) 92.42
3. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 86.57
4. David Warner (Australia) 79.75
5. Samiullah Shinwari (Afghanistan) 74.00

Fours

1. Rohit Sharma (India) 67
2. David Warner (Australia) 64
3. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 60
4. Jonny Bairstow (England) 55
5. Babar Azam (Pakistan) 50

Sixes

1. Eoin Morgan (England) 22
2. Aaron Finch (Australia) 18
3. Rohit Sharma (India) 14
4. Chris Gayle (West Indies) 12
5. Jonny Bairstow (England) 11

Fastest hundreds (by deliveries)

1. Eoin Morgan (England) 57 v Afghanistan
2. Jos Buttler (England) 75 v Pakistan
3. Carlos Brathwaite (West Indies) 80 v New Zealand
4. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 83 v West Indies
5. Rohit Sharma (India) 95 v Pakistan

BOWLERS

Most wickets

1. Mitchell Starc (Australia) 26
2. Mustafizur Rahman (Bangladesh) 20
=3. Lockie Ferguson (New Zealand) 17
=3. Jaspirt Bumrah (India) 17
=3. Mohammad Amir (Pakistan) 17
=3. Jofra Archer (England) 17

Economy rate (from seven or more innings)

1. Colin de Grandhomme (New Zealand) 4.46
2. Mujeeb Ur Rahman (Afghanistan) 4.47
3. Jasprit Bumrah (India) 4.48
4. Mohammad Nabi (Afghanistan) 4.61
5. Ben Stokes (England) 4.65

Dot balls

1. Jofra Archer (England) 300
2. Pat Cummins (Australia) 295
3. Mitchell Starc (Australia) 288
4. Trent Boult (New Zealand) 284
5. Kagiso Rabada (South Africa) 273

Sixes conceded

1. Rashid Khan (Afghanistan) 14
2. Yuzvendra Chahal (India) 13
=3. Mohammad Nabi (Afghanistan) 10
=3. Adil Rashid (England) 10
=5. Shakib Al Hasan (Bangladesh) 9
=5. Dawlat Zadran (Afghanistan) 9
=5. Glenn Maxwell (Australia) 9

Runs conceded

1. Mustafizur Rahman (Bangladesh) 483
2. Adil Rashid (England) 433
3. Mitchell Starc (Australia) 432
4. Gulbadin Naib (Afghanistan) 419
5. Mohammad Saifuddin (Bangladesh) 417

The Cricket World Cup semi-final spots have been decided, with India, Australia, England and New Zealand into the final four.

But what of the half a dozen teams not to make it through?

Some arguably performed better than expected, while some – we're looking at you, West Indies and South Africa – were hugely disappointing.

For fans of those two sides, our World Cup report card may not make for pretty reading…

 

PAKISTAN (5th, W5 L3 N/R1)
RATING: C+

Ahead of the tournament, all the talk focused on their inconsistency and Sarfraz Ahmed's side lived up to their billing, summed up by their opening thrashing by the West Indies followed by a superb victory over favourites England. They were outclassed by Australia and India but finished strongly, winning four straight matches and only missed out on the semis due to their inferior net run rate, irreparably damaged by that Windies hammering. Mohammad Amir was excellent with the ball, picking up 17 wickets, while Babar Azam showed his class with the bat and Haris Sohail's form made a mockery of Pakistan's earlier faith in spent force Shoaib Malik.

SRI LANKA (6th, W3 L4 N/R2)
RATING: C

The Lions looked massively under-strength coming in, but they could argue that successive washouts against Pakistan and Bangladesh cost them a fairer shot at a top-four finish. The undoubted highlight was their stunning win over England, where veteran seamer Lasith Malinga rolled back the years. At the other end of the scale, 21-year-old Avishka Fernando hinted at a bright future with a marvellous hundred against the Windies in a dead rubber.

SOUTH AFRICA (7th, W3 L5 N/R1)
RATING: E

Even for a country with a long history of Cricket World Cup calamity, South Africa will look back on this campaign as a particularly miserable one. From AB de Villiers' attempted retirement U-turn just before the squad was announced to losing premier quick Dale Steyn to injury, the Proteas were in disarray before game one. A solitary point from their first four matches left them with too much to do as the likes of Hashim Amla, Quinton de Kock and Faf du Plessis failed to fill the void left by De Villiers in the top order.

BANGLADESH (8th, W3 L5 N/R1)
RATING: B+

A superb campaign – belied by their final position in the table – spearheaded by the remarkable performances of all-rounder Shakib Al Hasan, who racked up 606 runs and took 11 wickets with his wily left-arm spin – the first player to score 500+ runs and claim 10+ dismissals at a World Cup. There were impressive wins against South Africa and West Indies while they ran New Zealand and India mighty close. On this evidence, the Tigers will be genuine contenders in India in 2023.

WEST INDIES (9th, W2 L6 N/R1)
RATING: F

Not bottom of the table, but certainly bottom of the class. A squad filled with giants capable of smashing 100-metre sixes and bowling 90+ mph, the Windies let themselves down badly at this tournament. An opening annihilation of Pakistan promised much, but – scintillating centuries from Carlos Brathwaite and Nicholas Pooran aside – they failed to show the required application. Andre Russell's fitness issues caught up with him midway through the tournament, while 39-year-old Chris Gayle's intention to reverse his retirement looked a mistake. It is time to blood some fresh talent.

AFGHANISTAN (10th, W0 L9)
RATING: D

They may have finished as the only side without a point, but it is not all doom and gloom for Afghanistan. The tournament's lowest-ranked team improved as the campaign progressed, giving India and Pakistan almighty scares in agonisingly narrow defeats. A change of captaincy shortly before the finals, as well as knee-injury victim Mohammad Shahzad arguing against the decision to send him home and Aftab Alam's banishment for a disciplinary violation, will certainly have proved unwelcome distractions. The next World Cup in sub-continental conditions will surely suit a side with four years' more experience.

After five arduous weeks, the Cricket World Cup group stage has reached its climax and four teams are left standing.

Hosts and pre-tournament favourites England briefly flirted with a disappointing early exit before rallying to beat India and New Zealand and reach the last four.

Lying in wait are old rivals Australia at Edgbaston on Thursday, while India and New Zealand will do battle first in Manchester in two days' time.

But before we sit back and take in the final acts of a hugely enjoyable tournament, let's review the thrills and spills (and a couple of comedy moments) of an enthralling group stage.

 

Rihanna delights in Durham

Over a decade ago, Rihanna's smash hit 'Umbrella' enjoyed an extended stay at the top of the UK album charts but there was no need for the brollies at Durham as West Indies faced off with Sri Lanka.

Unfortunately, the Barbados-born popstar saw the Windies beaten by 23 runs, but there was a tearful reunion with assistant coach Roddy Eastwick – a former school teacher of Rihanna's. 


Bees create buzz at The Riverside

An unbroken 175-run stand between Hashim Amla and Faf du Plessis stung Sri Lanka at The Riverside.

But it was a swarm of bees that created quite the buzz on social media. The honey-loving insects caused a sudden delay, with players having to hit the deck to take evasive action.


Roy clatters Wilson

We are very, very, very sorry Joel Wilson…but this was undoubtedly hilarious.

Jason Roy brought up a century in England's beating of Bangladesh but, while tracking the progress of the ball, did not see the poor, unaware umpire who was completely clattered by the opener in comical scenes.

Once back to his feet, a slightly sheepish Wilson saw the funny side.


Bairstow answers critics head on

England's defeats to Sri Lanka and Australia drew plenty of criticism at home, not least from Michael Vaughan, which led to an unsavoury back-and-forth with Jonny Bairstow.

But Bairstow responded in impressive fashion, making centuries against India and New Zealand to help England progress to the last four.

Celebrating that latter century, Bairstow rubbed his hair in a seemingly light-hearted jibe at Vaughan's previous treatment to bolster his hairline.


Stokes or Woakes?

Two stunning catches, but who did it better – Ben Stokes or Chris Woakes?

All-rounder Stokes plucked a stunning one-hander in the deep off Andile Phehlukwayo in the tournament's opening match between England and South Africa at The Oval.

Not to be outdone, Woakes took a brilliant full-length dive on the boundary to send Rishabh Pant packing in England's much-needed win over India. Superman, eat your heart out.


Hat-trick heroes

Afghanistan had the chance for a famous upset against India at the Rose Bowl. Twelve runs were needed off four deliveries…enter Mohammed Shami.

The paceman took the vital wicket of dangerman Mohammad Nabi and followed up with the scalps of Aftab Alam and Mujeeb Ur Rahman to end Afghanistan's hopes. Three wickets in three balls.

New Zealand lost out to trans-Tasman rivals Australia at Lord's, but Trent Boult had individual reason to celebrate with a hat-trick of his own.

A stunning finish in the final over of Australia's innings saw Usman Khawaja, Mitchell Starc and Jason Behrendorff fall to full, in-swinging deliveries.

Boult, who has donated the ball to the MCC Museum, had to endure a nervy wait after a Behrendorff review.


Starc brilliance takes down Stokes

England made a dismal start in their pursuit of 286 against Australia at Lord's, slumping to 53-4.

Ben Stokes' courageous 89 threatened a fightback at the Home of Cricket. That was until Mitchell Starc's unplayable yorker swung in late to rattle the base of the stumps to end Stokes' resilience and England's chances of victory.


Pakistan deny Afghanistan

Afghanistan finished without a point after the group games but will rue a couple of missed opportunities – not least versus Pakistan, who slumped to 156-6 chasing 228 at Headingley. 

But captain Gulbadin Naib gave up 18 costly runs in the 46th over and Pakistan edged home with a couple of balls to spare against the underdogs in a dramatic finale.


Farewell Chris

Chris Gayle's final World Cup did not exactly go to plan. The explosive batsman made 242 runs from nine innings as West Indies – fancied by many to challenge – crashed out.

His final knock against Afghanistan yielded just seven runs, but there was time for some typical flamboyance when the charismatic Gayle celebrated a low catch with some press-ups.

A tidy turn with his occasional off-spin also yielded 1-28 and the 39-year-old lapped up the acclaim at stumps.

Pakistan veteran Shoaib Malik has announced his retirement from ODI cricket after his side's World Cup campaign ended.

A 94-run win over Bangladesh at Lord's on Friday was not enough to see Pakistan force their way into the semi-finals at New Zealand's expense.

Malik, 37, did not play having lost his place in the side earlier in the tournament and he confirmed after the match he will no longer be available for selection in ODI cricket.

"As I mentioned in my previous interviews, whenever I gave interviews, that I'm going to retire from World Cup cricket. Today was our last game, and I'm retiring from ODI cricket," Malik said in a statement made at a news conference.

"I had planned this for a few years ago to retire on the last Pakistan World Cup match. I'm sad that I'll be leaving the format of cricket that I once loved, but happy that I'll have more time to spend with my family. This will also allow me to focus on Twenty20 cricket.

"I would like to thank some of the most important people whose support and backing helped me through these 20 years of international cricket.

"Starting with the players I shared dressing rooms with, all the coaches I have under, my friends and family, the media, my sponsors, the Pakistan cricket board and Pakistan sports board.

"But most importantly, my fans. I love you all. Thank you."

Malik insisted he is not disappointed to have made such little impact in his last World Cup, having taken a single wicket and scored only eight runs across three innings.

"I think, if you go through the whole thing, sometimes you come out with a performance, sometimes you don't," he added. 

"But, of course, it's a big platform and expectations were high, but you don't perform that spot of life. I think life never stops, and I'm pretty satisfied with my ODI career."

Malik will go down in history as a Pakistan great, having played 287 ODIs, scoring 7,534 runs at an average of 34.55.

He made his ODI debut in October 1999 and produced nine centuries in the format, also chipping in with 158 wickets.

Sarfraz Ahmed paid tribute to Pakistan fast bowler Shaheen Afridi after he posted his country's best Cricket World Cup figures in Friday's win over Bangladesh.

Pakistan were knocked out of the World Cup as their 94-run win was not a large enough victory to overhaul New Zealand but much of the focus was on teenager Shaheen, who took 6-35 runs to decimate the Bangladesh batting order.

Captain Sarfraz considered the display "one of the best" he had seen but suggested 19-year-old Shaheen has consistently been performing at a similarly lofty level in the past couple of weeks.

"The way Shaheen is bowling in the last four matches is very good," he said in the post-match presentation. "The consistency is amazing, with the line and length.

"Today he's taken six wickets and it was one of the best bowling performances I've ever seen."

Pakistan crashed out despite winning four consecutive matches to finish the group stage, at least giving Sarfraz cause for encouragement.

"It's very unfortunate that we've played really good cricket in the last four matches but we could not qualify," he said. "There was only the one match that cost us [in terms of run rate].

"Throughout the tournament, we've played very good cricket and the boys responded very well after the India match."

Bangladesh also bowed out despite Shakib Al Hasan's 606 runs moving him clear as the tournament's top scorer, prompting captain Mashrafe Mortaza to offer an apology to his star man.

"The whole team feel very sorry for him because we couldn't support him throughout the tournament, otherwise the team would have been in a different zone," he said.

"He batted exceptionally in almost every match, bowling very well, fielding well. I think he's been fantastic."

Mortaza later indicated he will take time to decide whether to continue his international career.

"My future plan is, obviously, going home from here, and I will have a think," he added.

Shaheen Afridi produced a superb six-wicket haul as Pakistan defeated Bangladesh by 94 runs on Friday but saw their increasingly improbable Cricket World Cup bid ended due to the margin of victory.

Following England's win against New Zealand earlier in the week, Pakistan required a record-breaking ODI triumph by more than 300 runs to pip the Black Caps to fourth and last semi-final spot.

And their slimmest of hopes were briefly kept alive as they batted first at Lord's.

But after 100 from Imam-ul-Haq - from exactly 100 balls - and 96 from Babar Azam helped Pakistan to 315-9, their elimination was sealed eight runs into the Bangladesh reply, in which the 19-year-old Shaheen (6-35) came to the fore in spectacular fashion.

Shaheen became the youngest bowler to record a World Cup five-for.

A second-wicket stand of 157 between Imam and Babar had set Pakistan on their way to a consolation victory, with that partnership ended as the latter went lbw to Mohammad Saifuddin.

Imam stuck around for another partnership of 66 with Mohammad Hafeez (27), setting the foundation for Imad Wasim's 43 off 26 a part of a frantic finish to the innings, Bangladesh's Mustafizur Rahman taking 5-75.

Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed, struggling with injury for a time, returned to keep in the Bangladesh innings but, after an opening maiden and a poor early Haris Sohail drop, the score reached 8-0 to seal his side's fate.

The Pakistan bowlers made sure to enjoy the final few hours of their World Cup, though, with Shaheen taking the wickets of Tamim Iqbal (8), Liton Das (32) and then the ever-impressive Shakib Al Hasan (64).

Shadab Khan removed Mosaddek Hossain to halt hopes of a Bangladesh revival, Shaheen then capitalising with a further two wickets in three deliveries to set up a comfortable finish, completed with his sixth.

 

BABAR PICK OF BATSMEN

The damage had been done for Pakistan prior to this match, but Babar should accept very little of the blame for their early exit. His tournament ended with 474 runs, which is more than any Pakistan player had previously managed at a single World Cup, passing Javed Miandad's 437 in a superb knock at Lord's that included 11 fours.

There was also a batting star in the Bangladesh ranks, however, as Shakib ended his World Cup as the leading run scorer on 606.

SHAHEEN SHINES WITH BALL

Mustafizur had taken three wickets in the final over against India last time out and this time contributed another pair at the same stage for a second consecutive five-for, earning a place on the Lord's honours board.

But Shaheen stole the limelight when it came to exciting young bowlers. His first ODI five-for blew Bangladesh away, and he then took an extra wicket to seal victory and post the best Pakistan figures in the tournament's history.

New Zealand are guaranteed the last Cricket World Cup semi-final spot after Pakistan's faint hopes were ended at Lord's on Friday.

The ICC Champions Trophy holders needed to beat Bangladesh by a record ODI total of over 300 runs in their final group match, but could only post 315-9.

Bangladesh then made the necessary eight runs to eliminate Pakistan without reply inside two overs, aided by an awful Haris Sohail catch.

Pakistan can match the Black Caps' tally of 11 points by beating the Tigers, yet they will bow out on net run-rate.

Imam-ul-Haq made 100 off as many balls and Babar Azam (96) broke Javed Miandad's record of 437 runs in a single World Cup after Sarfraz Ahmed won the toss.

Those brilliant knocks were in vain, though, and New Zealand will take on Australia or India in the last four next week.

Sarfraz suffered more pain when he was struck on the elbow by a straight drive from Imad Wasim, forcing the Pakistan captain to retire hurt with five overs remaining.

He returned for the final ball of the innings, however, and was keeping as his side were knocked out early in the Bangladesh innings.

Pakistan head into Friday's final Cricket World Cup group game against Bangladesh knowing the odds are stacked firmly against their semi-final qualification hopes.

Reaching the knockout stages remains a mathematical possibility for Sarfraz Ahmed's side following fourth-placed New Zealand's loss to hosts England on Wednesday. 

Yet, in reality, an improbable result of freak proportions will be required if the fifth-placed side are to overhaul a Black Caps team two points clear of them and with a superior net run rate.

If they are to stand any chance of extending their stay in England at all, they must bat first.

Should the toss go their way, they will then be required to record a victory of well in excess of 300 runs - 311 runs after posting 350 or by 316 runs after scoring 400 - in order to better New Zealand's net run-rate, which stands at +0.175 as opposed to Pakistan's score of -0.792.

Do not expect Bangladesh to be pushovers, however. They have proven tricky opponents throughout the tournament and in star all-rounder Shakib Al Hasan possess one of the top performers of this World Cup. 

Shakib has already claimed a place in the record books by becoming the first all-rounder in tournament history to score 500 runs and claim 10 wickets - and he is unlikely to be finished yet.


TOURNAMENT SO FAR

With four wins from their opening eight matches - including the scalps of England and New Zealand - there are plenty of positives for Pakistan to take from this World Cup. Consistency has evaded them, however, and there is an air of resignation to their fate.

It is a tournament which has delivered some memorable moments for Bangladesh too. That opening-match triumph over South Africa has set the tone for a series of spirited - and, on three occasions, winning - performances with the superb Shakib right at the very heart of it.


WHAT THEY SAID

Pakistan captain Sarfraz Ahmed: "Definitely, we're interested in finishing on a high note. So we will try our best. It is very difficult - 316 runs is a big margin. Only if you're batting first, if you score 600 runs or 500 runs. I don't know what the study is behind [how positions are decided in future World Cups] but I can't do anything."

Bangladesh coach Steve Rhodes: "There's no such thing as a dead rubber. Both teams desperate to beat each other. We certainly are. I'm pretty sure they are. They've got a lot to play for as well. So, we're looking to obviously win. We want to win. So if we can take the scalp of Pakistan in the World Cup, we'll be very, very proud of the boys."


OPTA FACTS

- Bangladesh have won their last four men's ODIs against Pakistan. Prior to this, Pakistan had recorded 31 wins from 32 clashes against the Tigers, including 25 in a row.
- Pakistan have won their last three Cricket World Cup 2019 matches; after becoming champions in 1992 they have only managed more consecutive victories at a single edition twice (four in both 1999 and 2015).
- Shakib Al Hasan has scored 542 runs so far, the most by a Bangladeshi at a single edition; in the process he has recorded six scores of 50+, only Sachin Tendulkar has recorded more in an edition of the tournament (seven in 2003).
- This will be the second meeting between Pakistan and Bangladesh at a World Cup, the first match took place when the tournament was last held in England (1999, Bangladesh won by 62 runs).

Mushtaq Ahmed believes England spinners Adil Rashid and Moeen Ali are ready to be match winners for the Cricket World Cup hosts.

Neither man has been at his most effective in the tournament to date, Rashid claiming seven wickets and Ali five.

But former Pakistan spinner Mushtaq, who worked with the pair as part of England's backroom staff in the past and now enjoys a role with West Indies, admires their qualities.

"They're good cricketers. They're match winners, Moeen and Adil," Mushtaq told Omnisport.

"Since they've been playing for England in one-day cricket and also Test cricket, Moeen Ali has gotten lots of wickets, and Adil also.

"Since they've been playing together, I can see England become a number one team, because in the middle overs they get lots of wickets, and they control the game in the middle overs, so I think they're both playing a huge role for England."

Mushtaq, who had spells in county cricket with Somerset, Surrey and Sussex, played 144 ODIs and 52 Tests for Pakistan in an international career that ran from 1990 to 2003.

He was frustrated by West Indies failing to produce at the World Cup, where they have won just once in eight matches and finish off against Afghanistan on Thursday at Headingley.

"I think we just didn't catch that moment where you close the game," said Mushtaq, speaking at the Pakistan Cricket Legends Tour in association with Penny Appeal.

"You know, we could actually win a few of the games like against New Zealand and against Australia. The things that were actually supposed to be winning situations we actually lost that period, lost those key points.

"So I think with the West Indies, obviously there were a few new guys in, there's plenty of things we have to discuss about that. When they played that first game against Pakistan, they seemed like they could be one of the four teams who are going to qualify for the semi-final.

"But obviously there's plenty of things to improve. They've got plenty of talent, but you've got to close that moment where you are actually nearly winning the game. So, we missed that opportunity."

Mushtaq also dismissed suggestions, raised by former fast bowler Shoaib Akhtar this week, that Pakistan skipper Sarfraz Ahmed is "fat" and "unfit".

"We should respect our players," said Mushtaq, on being presented with those claims. "They're giving everything for our country, they're trying to win cricket matches for Pakistan, so sometimes they lose, sometimes they win.

"I say that as an ex-cricketer, also part of Pakistan. Please respect your cricketers, they're trying to entertain you, they're trying to win games for Pakistan. If they don't, keep supporting your Pakistani heroes. They're the people who actually go and express themselves and they sacrifice a lot for Pakistan."

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