Wales will be without Josh Navidi for the rest of their Rugby World Cup campaign after the back-rower sustained a hamstring injury in the quarter-final win over France.

Warren Gatland's side secured their place in the last four with a dramatic 20-19 victory over Les Bleus, who had Sebastien Vahaamahina sent off.

Navidi had overtaken Ross Moriarty as Wales' first-choice number eight in Japan but was forced off during the first half on Sunday.

Gatland - who plans to bring in a back, rather than another forward to replace the Cardiff Blues player - has confirmed Navidi's World Cup is over.

"He'll be ruled out. He's no good," Gatland, whose side will face South Africa in the last four, told a news conference on Monday.

"We'll be looking to bring in a replacement tomorrow [Tuesday], but we've got to go through that process.

"It's disappointing for him. We'll keep him out here. It will be nice for him to stay out for the next couple of weeks. 

"It's disappointing for us to have a player ruled out. In saying that, these games are so physical to have only lost one player is a real positive for us.

"We've been pretty lucky. We're trying to keep everyone as healthy as we possibly can."

Jonathan Davies missed the quarter-final due to a knee injury, but Gatland is hopeful the centre will be available for selection on Sunday.

"He was touch and go for the weekend. He's been doing rehab and recovery," Gatland said of Davies.

"Hopefully he'll be up and running for a very light session tomorrow. We'll be doing more of the rugby on Wednesday. Hopefully he's fit and available."

Gatland claimed "the best side lost" following Wales' victory over France, but the outgoing coach was satisfied with his side's resilience and strength of character. 

"We're a bit disappointed about the performance. France played exceptionally well," he added. "I thought we showed some great character and got the win.

"Disappointed with a few aspects but looking forward it's about being excited about the semi-final of a World Cup."

England expect Jonny May and Jack Nowell to be fit for their Rugby World Cup semi-final against New Zealand, according to assistant coach Neal Hatley.

May scored two tries in England's dominant 40-16 victory over Australia on Saturday, helping Eddie Jones' side set up a last-four tie with the All Blacks, who thrashed Ireland.

However, England had cause for concern over May when the wing suffered a hamstring injury, while Nowell has also been dealing with a similar problem.

But Hatley has revealed both players are expected to be available for selection for Saturday's contest in Yokohama.

"It's fantastic where we are, all 31 being available for selection at the end of the week," said Hatley in a news conference.

"Jonny's bouncing around this morning. He has a small twinge and we'll assess where he is a little bit later today.

"He's in really good spirits, moving well, and we expect Jack to be fit for selection as well."

England last met reigning world champions New Zealand at Twickenham in November 2018, with the All Blacks edging out a 16-15 victory. Hatley, though, insists neither side should read too much into that previous meeting.

"I think the goal for us is to get better every day. I think we've improved, but they've improved as well. I don't think we can take a lot from what happened in Autumn," he added.

"You know, they were missing a few, we were missing a few, and I think both sides have improved since then, it's a whole different situation.

"We've got certain things that we'll l want to do in that first 15, 20 minutes and we need to focus on what we do right, then hopefully we'll replicate the same start."

Jones, meanwhile, lauded the current New Zealand side as the "greatest team" of all time - and not just in rugby union, either.

"We are playing the greatest team there has ever been in sport," he told reporters. "If you look at their record, I don't think there's a team that comes close to them for sustainability.

"Name me another team in the world that plays at the absolute top level that wins 90 per cent of their games.

"Now, talent doesn't matter. When you get to this stage of the tournament, it's about how strong the team is. The reason I took this job is because I saw a team that could be great and that was the challenge and they are starting to believe it."

World Rugby has opened an investigation after referee Jaco Peyper appeared to mock Sebastien Vahaamahina in a photo with Wales fans.

Peyper, taking charge of his 50th Test, sent Vahaamahina off in Wales' dramatic Rugby World Cup triumph over Les Bleus on Sunday, with the lock dismissed for elbowing Aaron Wainwright.

Though head coaches Jacques Brunel and Warren Gatland backed Peyper's decision, the South African official is now at the centre of an investigation after he posed for a photo with a group of Wales supporters.

In the picture, which was circulated on social media, Peyper has his elbow raised into a fan's chin.

France Rugby Federation vice-president Serge Simon took to his official Twitter account to demand an explanation.

He posted: "This photo if it is true is shocking and explanations will be necessary."

World Rugby confirmed they are looking into the matter.

"World Rugby is aware of a picture on social media of referee Jaco Peyper with a group of Wales fans taken after last night's [Sunday's] quarter-final between Wales and France in Oita," the governing body said.

"It would be inappropriate to comment further while we are establishing the facts."

Lyon's unbeaten start to the Top 14 season came to a halt as Jake McIntyre's boot helped Clermont Auvergne to a 24-15 victory on Sunday.

The visitors, who played over half an hour with 14 men, had won each of their opening seven matches of the campaign prior to their trip to a wet Marcel-Michelin Stadium.

McIntyre was key for an organised Clermont outfit, with the Australian fly-half nailing eight penalties in a contest devoid of tries. 

Jonathan Wisniewski struck five three-pointers of his own for Lyon, but Liam Gill – who received a yellow card in the first half – was sent off after committing another sin-binning offence for diving off his feet at a ruck and the away side were unable to find a route back into the game.

London Irish celebrated their return to the Premiership by earning a gutsy 29-26 victory over Wasps at the Ricoh Arena on Sunday.

The hosts trailed by three points at the break as Wasps debutant Zach Kibirige saw his double answered by Blair Cowan and Albert Tuisue, with Paddy Jackson's third successful penalty putting Irish ahead.

Ollie Hassell-Collins' try and another successful three-pointer from Jackson – making a first competitive appearance for the newly promoted side – further improved the visitors' lead but a yellow card for Ruan Botha for pulling down a driving maul left Irish in a spot of bother.

Dan Robson went over from close range and Jacob Umaga split the posts to bring Wasps within striking distance, but Irish held their nerve in Coventry.

Rassie Erasmus was thankful South Africa "knew which buttons to push" to fend off the threat of another Rugby World Cup defeat to Japan.

After their stunning loss to the Brave Blossoms four years ago in Brighton, it was a different story at the Tokyo Stadium on Sunday as South Africa emerged 26-3 winners.

They will face Wales in the semi-finals next Sunday in Yokohama, and the Springboks were buoyant after seeing off familiar foes in the quarters.

But the lead had been just 5-3 at half-time, and Erasmus admitted: "We were nervous."

He and his coaching staff largely stayed out of dressing-room discussions, leaving it for the likes of captain Siya Kolisi to set minds at ease.

"Going in at half-time only being up a few points and leaving a few tries out there, there was definitely a little bit of a lull and a quietness in our changing room," Erasmus said.

"But I think, being together for 17 weeks, the guys knew which buttons to push to get ourselves out of that lull and come out and produce in the second half. We're very proud of that."

Makazole Mapimpi grabbed his second try of the game and man of the match Faf de Klerk also dotted down as South Africa gradually ground down the energetic hosts.

Erasmus praised the "intensity and tenacity" of Japan, suggesting they would be worthy additions to the Rugby Championship – currently contested by the Springboks, Australia, South Africa and Argentina – if logistics made it viable.

"I do know the brand they play is pretty exciting and it would really fit in," said Erasmus, calling it "a nice proposition" but stressing he had not been party to any such discussions.

Erasmus was thrilled with the defensive strength of his team, as they nullified Japan's attacking vibrancy when both Ireland and Scotland had succumbed.

"I think we trust our system really well and we know defence is a pretty important thing if you want to win a World Cup," Erasmus added in his post-match news conference.

The former Munster coach thinks his experience in the Pro14 competition, facing Welsh club sides, could be useful as South Africa when to clear the last hurdle before the final.

"I've got good hidings against Scarlets and those guys when I was coaching Munster, and good wins against them as well," he said.

"They are definitely a team with a lot of X factor, but one thing that strikes me about them ... is they've got a great coaching staff and I think they've created depth in every single position.

"They've got good confidence, great team spirit. It'll be a big challenge for us. Knowing the way the Welsh teams play may help me a little bit."

Jamie Joseph showed how much it hurt as Japan's journey at the Rugby World Cup ended with defeat at the merciless hands of South Africa.

An absorbing tussle at Tokyo Stadium was only one-sided in the closing minutes as South Africa pulled away to win 26-3 and set up a semi-final against Wales next Sunday.

After winning all four of their group games, and having beaten South Africa against all odds at the last World Cup, there were growing hopes in Japan that the tournament hosts could spring another surprise.

It was not to be though, with South Africa's resolute defence repelling the threat of Japan's scintillating backs.

Coach Joseph said: "At the end of the day I'm so proud of my team.

"[They showed] the courage, the tenacity, certainly the determination. I really have to take my hat off to the team.

"And I have to thank the fans - we wouldn't be here if we didn't have the support of the whole country. It's been marvellous."

Joseph appeared to start welling up as his post-match television interview continued, adding: "We're really proud of what we've achieved at the World Cup. We're going to enjoy that a little bit later on.

"I'm disappointed for the players because they give so much to the group and they gave so much to the country in this World Cup."

With his voice faltering, Joseph, who succeeded Eddie Jones after the last World Cup, told the tournament interviewer: "It's been a little bit disappointing, mate."

Captain Michael Leitch signed off his post-match interview with the comment: "Japan's only going to get stronger."

That remains to be seen, but recent reports that Joseph could stay on as coach appear to offer promise.

Leitch accepted the better side won the day, as the Brave Blossoms bowed out.

"Test match rugby is all about creating opportunities and taking your moments," Leitch said.

"I think we had a few opportunities to capitalise on and unfortunately South Africa kept us out, and with their powerful set-piece they had us going backwards.

"Congratulations to the South Africa team - they played their A game and they played it very well.

"I'm extremely proud of what this team's done - Jamie has done an excellent job. And the fans, the country ... I think we've done them proud."

Abandoned, crumbling stadiums and empty, cracked swimming pools. Plummeting participation and dwindling interest. Platitudes and empty gestures.

The reality of sporting legacy is it rarely delivers. A capricious concept dressed up as big-hearted altruism, often propagated by politicians fishing for likes; the cornerstone of bid documents, legacy can look great on PowerPoint but has little influence at pitch level.

Any nation can birth a sporting jamboree. The woozy thrill of conception is followed by a deliciously pregnant wait and then a rush of endorphins on arrival. Postpartum reality is rather more complicated.

Material legacy is often found in infrastructure – the road and rail and housing improvements that any responsible government should be carrying out, global sporting spectacle or not.

The real sporting legacies are bound up in memories created on the field, which is why Japan's Rugby World Cup will live long, despite Sunday's 26-3 quarter-final loss to South Africa; which is why the Springboks' 1995 home triumph - Nelson Mandela their 16th man - so resonated.

Even if the Land of the Rising Sun will not see its own heroes crowned as World Cup champions in Yokohama next month, their brand of attacking, running rugby has lit up the tournament.

By reaching the knockout stage for the first time, Japan piqued interest of millions who never previously gave rugby a second glance. Perhaps the Brave Blossoms themselves have peaked, after the huge investment it has taken to reach this point, to forge a team capable of taking on - and beating - some of the world's best. To guarantee Japan - a team who lost 145-17 to New Zealand at the 1995 World Cup - would not only avoid humiliation but become everyone's favourite second team.

Japan were named as hosts a full decade ago, and in tandem with world rugby chiefs signed up to an Impact Beyond 2019 legacy project, designed to grow rugby throughout Asia. The message seems to be that, despite Japan hosting a whole blimming bells-and-whistles World Cup, the sport still needs to be force-fed into the culture long after the tournament ends.

Investment in Japan's team has been spectacularly well-judged, with previous coaches John Kirwan and Eddie Jones building the platform for Jamie Joseph's current squad to dazzle a domestic and worldwide audience over the past month.

Over 50 million people in Japan reportedly watched the crucial pool win over Scotland. That is almost half the nation. Even more will surely have tuned in for the Springboks clash, viewers who will dictate the long-term positioning of rugby within Japanese sport.

Baseball is number one, with sumo, football, tennis, wrestling, golf, basketball and a host more traditionally ahead of rugby.

Next year the passion of the Japanese people will shift to Olympic sport, when Tokyo stages the 2020 Games.

They are spoiled for choice. We are all spoiled for choice.

Rugby has made a breakthrough, Japan gave the world a team to adore in the Blossoms, but not every great show needs an after-party. Despite a rash of giddy think pieces - meta - Japan really aren't on track to rival the All Blacks.

Perhaps they will flower again in four years' time; perhaps the screaming, roaring fans that packed out Tokyo Stadium on Sunday will have more reasons to celebrate in France.

But after this success was created with precision tooling, enormous wads of yen, and awash with a strong flavouring of imported delicacies, now is surely the time for Japanese rugby to be left to evolve naturally.

Perhaps this isn't the start of something big. Perhaps it's the end of something big. The miracle of Brighton. Six World Cup victories in a row. Sassy wing twins Kenki Fukuoka and Kotaro Matsushima.

Sayonara for now, Japan. You played your part supremely well.

Rassie Erasmus felt the scoreline in South Africa's Rugby World Cup quarter-final victory over Japan was not a true reflection of how the game played out.

The Springboks progressed to a last-four meeting with Wales by vanquishing the demons of their shock loss to the Brave Blossoms in the 2015 World Cup with a 26-3 triumph in Tokyo on Sunday.

Makazole Mapimpi, who scored a hat-trick in a 41-7 win over Jamie Joseph's side in a warm-up match in September, put the Rugby Championship winners ahead after four minutes but Japan dominated the possession and territory in the rest of the opening period.

However, the hosts were only able to register three points from the boot of Yu Tamura while Tendai Mtawarira was in the sin bin for a tip tackle on Keita Inagaki and went into the break 5-3 down.

The Springboks showed greater discipline and control in the second period, with Handre Pollard nudging them clear via a trio of penalties before Faf de Klerk and Mapimpi crossed in the final 14 minutes to put them out of sight.

Erasmus said: "In both games we played [against Japan] the score doesn't reflect how tough it was. At half-time it was 5-3 and then we got one or two runaway tries.

"This was a five- or six-point game – the margin we got at the end wasn't a true reflection.

"They were very determined. Their substitutions made a hell of a difference. This Japanese team is well coached, they're fit, they're tough, they're tight and they've got great support, so at the end of the day we must be satisfied with the win."

The Springboks were guilty of excessive handling errors in promising areas in the opening period but Erasmus praised Japan's defence as he set his sights on the Webb Ellis Cup.

"It was frustrating, we had two or three tries in the first half that because of knock-ons we didn't score, which could've taken it away from them," added the South Africa boss.

"But then again the way they defend and the way they scramble, it just shows the character of their team.

"We want to try to go all the way. Now we've got Wales. They are ranked higher than us and they got a win against France this weekend. We will start tomorrow on them, but we'll enjoy tonight and know the next two weeks will be tough."

Captain Siya Kolisi was impressed by the fight Japan put up and was proud of his team for keeping things close in a tough first half for South Africa.

"We knew what Michael Leitch and his boys were going to bring today. They said all week they were coming for us in our set-piece and it took a lot out of us to keep on fighting," said Kolisi.

"But credit to my boys, we fought, we ground it out. You really should be proud of your team, they gave it everything out there.

"We knew how fast they can play the game and they play a style that's fearless and that's exactly what they said they'd do this week and they didn't shy away from it today.

"We knew we had to get up, especially when we were one man down - I'm really glad the boys didn't concede a lot of points there. That's what we pride ourselves on, hard-working defence."

South Africa gained vengeance for their shock loss to Japan in 2015 by comfortably defeating the Brave Blossoms 26-3 in an enthralling Rugby World Cup quarter-final in Tokyo.

Japan pulled off a stunning 34-32 triumph over the Springboks in the previous tournament but were unable to repeat the trick in their first appearance in the last eight as their dream run on home soil ended.

South Africa captain Siya Kolisi said in the build-up that a 41-7 victory over Jamie Joseph's side in September provided a measure of revenge, though they secured the ultimate tonic to book a semi-final against Wales.

Makazole Mapimpi scored a hat-trick in the warm-up meeting and this time touched down either side of Faf de Klerk's try as Japan were punished for failing to make the most of an impressive first-half display.

After the high of reaching the quarter-finals, Japan were brought down to earth inside four minutes when De Klerk fed Mapimpi off the scrum and the wing breezed through the challenge of Yu Tamura to race in at the left corner.

The Springboks had Tendai Mtawarira sent to the sin bin on his 100th Test start for a tip tackle on Keita Inagaki, yet a penalty won against the feed at the scrum that Tamura slotted between the posts was all Japan had to show for their numerical advantage.

Japan continued to dominate the possession and territory when South Africa were restored to their full complement, though they were unable to capitalise and move ahead before the break.

Handre Pollard atoned for failing to convert Mapimpi's try by splitting the posts with a trio of penalties within 16 minutes of the restart, helping the Springboks edge clear.

Rassie Erasmus' men were far more disciplined in the second half and moved well out of sight when De Klerk crossed following an unstoppable rolling maul.

Mapimpi put the result beyond all doubt with 10 minutes remaining when he fended off Kotaro Matsushima for a second try to keep the Rugby Championship winners in the hunt for another trophy.

 

Japan's journey ends

Victories over Ireland and Scotland - the latter in an incredibly emotional shoot-out for progression in the wake of Typhoon Hagibis - provided the hosts with unforgettable moments they will hope help continue the development of rugby union in Japan. While they were unable to replicate the miracle of Brighton from four years ago, they can be incredibly proud of their displays in 2019.

All-action De Klerk

Sale Sharks scrum-half De Klerk dictated the play and provided a calming presence for South Africa in a difficult first period littered with handling errors. He made some important tackles to keep the Brave Blossoms at bay and was rewarded with a deserved try in the 66th minute.

Warren Gatland conceded the better team lost after Wales came from behind to see off France in the World Cup quarter-finals on Sunday.

Wales recovered from 12-0 and 19-10 down to defeat a 14-man France, who saw Sebastien Vahaamahina sent off for swinging an elbow into the head of Aaron Wainwright in the 49th minute.

Gatland's men had been second best up until that point, with France wasting opportunities to take a more commanding lead in the first half.

Vahaamahina's dismissal proved a turning point but Wales had to wait until the 74th minute for the winning try, which came in contentious fashion as Ross Moriarty went over after Charles Ollivon had the ball stripped.

Speaking to BBC Radio 5 Live afterwards, Gatland said: "I think the better team lost. The thing about our boys is they don't give up, they keep trying until the end.

"We kept working away. France came out of the blocks well. At half-time we just said we've got to score next, we did that and obviously the red card was the turning point. It was pretty special."

Back in February after Wales came back from 16-0 down to claim an away win over France in the Six Nations, Gatland declared that his side had "forgotten how to lose".

Asked in his post-match media conference if their turnaround was a prime example of that, Gatland replied: "I think it was. The message at half time was that France had started well.

"You have to take your hat off to them. I thought they were excellent and very unlucky. They've definitely improved.

"The red card was significant but that sometimes galvanises teams.

"We didn't play well but we can be excited about looking forward to the semi-final."

Number eight Josh Navidi's participation in the semi-final, where they will face either Japan or South Africa, is in doubt due to a hamstring injury.

"Josh Navidi has done a hamstring," Gatland added. "We don't know how serious it is yet."

Jacques Brunel suspects Wales' match-winning try in their World Cup quarter-final win over France should not have been awarded.

Wales came from behind to beat 14-man France in Oita on Sunday, their cause aided significantly by a 49th-minute red card shown to Sebastien Vahaamahina, who swung his elbow into the head of Aaron Wainwright.

Warren Gatland's men struggled to take full advantage of the dismissal, but found the winning try in the 74th minute as Ross Moriarty went over after Tomos Williams stole the ball from Charles Ollivon close to the France line.

The TMO awarded the try despite the suggestion the ball went forward after it was taken away from Ollivon, a decision Brunel was far from happy with.

"The red card, I don't contest it. When you see the images, it’s very clear. He had a reflex," Brunel told a media conference.

"Of course he feels bad, he's not happy with what he's done.

"We cannot deny it. I don't have any problem with the decision. There are other decisions I don't agree with.

"I would like to see the last try again because I think there is a player who grabbed the ball and then it went forward.

"So I'd like to see that decision again and I'm a little disappointed."

Asked about his team's response to the red card, Brunel added: "We weren't really disorganised but we should have reacted differently.

"We didn't show enough character because we had opportunities to stretch the lead.

"So that's why I'm saying the outcome of the match is difficult to accept."

 

For the majority of Sunday's World Cup quarter-final with Wales, France were in control thanks to a performance that belied the reports of discord in the camp.

Arguably the most unpredictable side in world rugby, Les Bleus showed the best side of themselves for so long in a contest few expected them to have the better of, against a Wales team briefly ranked number one in the world this year.

France were aggressive, fluent with ball in hand and produced the kind of aesthetically pleasing play that is synonymous with their country's finest in full flight.

As Virimi Vakatawa stepped past Josh Navidi and found Romain Ntamack, who then fed Antoine Dupont to set up Charles Ollivon to cruise under the posts and put France 12-0 up, even the most ardent of Wales fan will have feared a vintage display from the side that controversially denied them in the semi-finals in 2011.

Even after an error allowed Adam Wainwright to get Wales on the board, France remained the superior outfit and, despite a pair of missed kicks from Ntamack, it would have been tough to find too many tipping Warren Gatland's men to make a comeback akin to the one they produced at the Stade de France in the Six Nations this year.

However, France are as well known for their meltdowns as they are for their free-flowing style, and it was a moment of madness nine minutes into the second half that ultimately proved crucial in condemning them to a heart-breaking 20-19 defeat.

Guilhem Guirado was recalled to the starting XV for France despite rumours of a bust-up with coach Jacques Brunel, and the atmosphere in the dressing room is unlikely to have been a pleasant one after Sebastien Vahaamahina made a telling contribution to his own side's downfall.

It is unclear whether we will ever be able to understand the method behind the back-row's decision to launch a swinging elbow into the side of Wainwright's head, and his dismissal will go down in World Cup infamy as it proved the turning point in a French failure.

To their credit, Brunel's men held up well despite their man disadvantage and still led 19-13 going into the final six minutes.

Yet Tomos Williams ripped the ball from Ollivon's grasp yards out from the France line and it was collected by Justin Tipuric before Ross Moriarty, whose yellow card preceded the Vakatawa try, turned from villain to hero by scoring the winning try.

France may feel aggrieved, with the try awarded by the TMO despite the suggestion the ball went forward after being stolen from Ollivon, while many in the Wales camp will feel luck has evened out after Sam Warburton's contentious red card in the semi eight years ago.

Brunel's men only have themselves to blame, though. While the crucial try was questionable, Wales' turnaround was aided by handling errors, missed kicks and an inexplicable moment of gross indiscipline.

Consistent also-ran in the Six Nations, France have lurched from one disappointment to the next since their agonising defeat to New Zealand in the 2011 World Cup final.

Gatland conceded the best team lost in Oita, but succinctly summed up the continued issue for a side that now infuriate more than they inspire.

"I thought France definitely improved since the Six Nations," said Gatland. "Losing becomes a habit, but so does winning and we are in that habit at the moment."

France are firmly in the losing habit and, with the next World Cup to be held on home soil, they have four years to change that by channelling the fire that can make them such an attractive side to watch into consistency, rather than self-inflicted collapses.

Ross Moriarty went from villain to hero for Wales as Warren Gatland's team beat 14-man France 20-19 to reach the Rugby World Cup semi-finals.

His 74th-minute try shattered the hopes of a France side who had looked like clinging on for victory after Sebastien Vahaamahina saw red for a disgraceful elbow into the face of Wales flanker Aaron Wainwright.

France scored a pair of tries inside the opening eight minutes and led 19-10 at half-time, with replacement Moriarty having spent a costly 10 minutes in the sin bin.

But Vahaamahina's moment of recklessness proved pivotal, with Wales eventually making their extra man count in a nail-biter - just as France did when beating the Red Dragons 9-8 in the 2011 semi-final at Eden Park.

Australia head coach Michael Cheika has stepped down following the Wallabies' Rugby World Cup exit in Japan.

Cheika confirmed he will not seek re-appointment after Australia were routed 40-16 by England in the World Cup quarter-finals on Saturday.

The 52-year-old, who guided the Wallabies to the 2015 World Cup final as he was named World Rugby Coach of the Year, bristled at questions over his future in the immediate aftermath of Australia's elimination.

However, former Waratahs boss Cheika quit on Sunday – ending his five-year stint in charge of Australia.

"It is no secret I have no relationship with the CEO [Raelene Castle] and not much with the chairman [Cameron Clyne]," Cheika was quoted as saying by the Sydney Morning Herald.

Cheika replaced Ewen McKenzie in 2014 and he made an immediate impact as the Wallabies reached the 2015 World Cup final – beaten by New Zealand.

That run to the decider saw Cheika become the first Australia coach to claim World Rugby's top coaching award since Rod Macqueen in 2001.

But the Wallabies' performances slowly regressed and pressure mounted on heading into this year's World Cup.

In a statement released by Rugby Australia, Cheika said: "I got asked the question in the press conference about what's going to happen going forward and at the time I wasn't keen to answer, but I always knew the answer in my head.

"I just wanted to speak to my wife and tell a few people up there [on the Rugby Australia board] about it.

"I put my chips in earlier in the year - I told people no win, no play.

"So, I'm the type of man who always goes to back what he says and I knew from the final whistle, but I just wanted to give it that little bit time to cool down, talk to my people and then make it clear."

New Zealander Dave Rennie – who is in charge of Glasgow Warriors having previously led the Chiefs to two Super Rugby titles – is the favourite to replace Cheika.

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