Nick Kyrgios bounced back from a tough defeat to Roger Federer to keep Team World in the mix for a breakthrough Laver Cup victory in a doubles success alongside Jack Sock.

Europe, who have won the prior two editions of the competition, lead 7-5 heading into the final day, but they might have had one hand on the trophy already if not for Kyrgios.

A home side able to name a line-up where each of their six players are ranked higher than John Isner, their opponents' top star, celebrated singles triumphs for Federer and Rafael Nadal but found Kyrgios in determined mood late on Saturday evening.

Team World had struck first to level the contest at 3-3, with wins on the second day worth two points - double their first-day value, while third-day victories earn three.

Isner saw opponent Alexander Zverev fall apart and clinched a 6-7 (2-7) 6-4 10-1 success.

Pegged back, matters looked to be going from bad to worse for Europe when the dangerous Kyrgios took the first set against Federer.

But the Swiss veteran recovered to triumph 6-7 (5-7) 7-5 10-7 and it appeared to be plain sailing from there, with Nadal winning the final singles contest of the day, easing past Milos Raonic 6-3 7-6 (7-1) to regain complete control of the competition.

"Being here for me is a very positive energy," Nadal said. "I like being around such a great team and the crowd is amazing.

"I feel very lucky [to win] the first set. I started to play better later in the match and I think I played a very good tie-break in the end."

The Spaniard was back on court to close out Saturday's play, teaming up with Stefanos Tsitsipas, to take on Kyrgios and Sock.

However, Kyrgios gave an early indication of what was to come as he started in impressive fashion again with some blistering winners in an opener Team World dominated, breaking swiftly and protecting the serve with ease.

The Australian was guilty of gifting away the decisive first break in the second set, making a mess of a seemingly straightforward volley, before coming into his own again with the match level.

Nadal was too often left to plough a lone furrow by Tsitsipas and Kyrgios excelled at the net, greeting each European error in typically extravagant fashion.

Fittingly, after a one-sided tie-break, the match was clinched on Kyrgios' serve 6-4 3-6 10-6 to set up an intriguing final day.

Daniil Medvedev racked up another straight-sets win to book a shot at Borna Coric in the St Petersburg Open final.

The US Open runner-up, who has enjoyed a sensational run of form since Wimbledon, defeated Egor Gerasimov 7-5 7-5 in the last four.

Qualifier Gerasimov was competitive but unable to repeat his quarter-final upset of third seed Matteo Berrettini.

Medvedev made the decisive break late in each set and dropped serve just once in the 90-minute match, the Russian reaching his eighth final of 2019 as a result.

He is the first player since Novak Djokovic at the end of 2018 to reach the final in five consecutive tournaments played.

Top seed Medvedev will meet Coric after the Croatian came from behind to defeat Joao Sousa 3-6 7-6 (7-5) 6-1.

Coric, seeded fourth, has won all of his three matches this week in a deciding set to reach a sixth career ATP Tour final.

Sousa lost a contest lasting two hours and 16 minutes despite saving 14 of 17 break points. A tense second-set tie-break, which was level at 5-5 before Coric won two straight points, ultimately proved decisive.

Coric holds a 4-1 head-to-head advantage over Medvedev, who is looking to become the first Russian to win in St Petersburg since Mikhail Youzhny 15 years ago.

At the Moselle Open, Aljaz Bedene will meet Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the final.

World number 76 Bedene reached his first ATP Tour final of the year after disappointing the home fans in Metz with an upset 4-6 6-1 6-2 win over France's Benoit Paire.

But the home support will have Tsonga to get behind on Sunday after he overcame fellow Frenchman Lucas Pouille 7-6 (8-6) 7-6 (7-4).

Both players dominated on serve, with Pouille failing to convert the solitary break-point opportunity of the match while leading 6-5 in the first set, as Tsonga reached his fifth Moselle Open final.

Daniil Medvedev showed no sign of suffering a US Open hangover as the top seed eased through to the quarter-finals at the St Petersburg Open.

Playing for the first time since his five-set defeat to Rafael Nadal in the final at Flushing Meadows, Medvedev brushed aside fellow Russian Evgeny Donskoy 7-5 6-3 after 76 minutes on court.

Next up for Medvedev will be another compatriot in fifth seed Andrey Rublev, who dominated in a deciding set to oust Ricardas Berankis of Lithuania 6-4 6-7 (5-7) 6-1.

US Open semi-finalist Matteo Berrettini was on court for less than an hour in his 6-1 6-2 victory against Roberto Carballes Baena, with the third seed's quest for a third title on the ATP Tour this year continuing against Belarusian qualifier Egor Gerasimov in the last eight.

However, Russia's Karen Khachanov failed to make it into the quarters, the second seed going down 7-6 (7-2) 6-4 to Joao Sousa.

There was also a shock at the Moselle Open on Thursday, as top seed David Goffin was beaten 6-3 6-2 by Pablo Carreno Busta.

Seventh-seeded Frenchman Gilles Simon also exited the tournament on home soil in Metz but there was better news for his countrymen Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Lucas Pouille, the duo recording respective victories over Pierre-Hugues Herbert (6-3 6-4) and Lorenzo Sonego (6-1 6-4).

Nikoloz Basilashvili, the second seed for the tournament, also progressed to set up a meeting with Tsonga, ousting qualifier Yannick Maden 6-2 7-6 (8-6).

 

Benoit Paire recorded just his second victory over fellow Frenchman Richard Gasquet to progress at the Moselle Open on Wednesday.

Gasquet held a 7-1 career record going into the match against his compatriot but failed to capitalise on winning the first set against Paire, who relied on his excellent service game to rally for a 3-6 6-3 6-4 triumph.

Next up will be another countryman in Gregoire Barrere, a 3-6 7-6 (8-6) 6-2 winner over Antoine Hoang, while Gilles Simon remains on track for glory on home soil - for a fourth time - after seeing off Marius Copil in straight sets.

Ugo Humbert could not provide another French success, losing in three sets to Yannick Maden.

In the late game, Fernando Verdasco went down in a three-set tussle with Filip Krajinovic, the Spanish fifth seed knocked out after one hour and 51 minutes on court.

At the St Petersburg Open, Mikhail Kukushkin prevailed in a clash between two former champions.

Kukushkin, the sixth seed who lifted the title back in 2010, overcame 2017 champion Damir Dzumhur 7-6 (7-2) 6-2 to seal his place in the quarter-finals.

He is joined by Egor Gerasimov, the qualifier causing an upset as he downed seventh-seeded Frenchman Adrian Mannarino in straight sets, winning 6-3 6-1 in just over an hour.

Eighth seed Casper Ruud avoided a shock in his last-32 tie against Alexander Bublik, albeit the Norwegian had to rally from a set down for a 6-7 (3-7) 6-4 6-2 triumph.

Jo-Wilfried Tsonga claimed his first ATP Tour win since July at the Moselle Open, while Evgeny Donskoy booked a date with US Open finalist Daniil Medvedev at the St Petersburg Open.

After first-round defeats at the Rogers Cup and US Open, Tsonga this month dropped down to the Challenger Tour and won the Cassis Open without dropping a set.

The former world number five, a three-time champion in Metz, came from a set down to defeat Pablo Andujar 3-6 6-1 6-2 and set up a second-round clash with Pierre-Hugues Herbert, who downed eighth seed Jan-Lennard Struff 7-6 (7-3) 6-4.

Pablo Carreno Busta made light work of Julian Lenz, triumphing 6-1 6-1 in just 57 minutes, and the Spaniard will face top seed David Goffin in round two.

There were also wins for Richard Gasquet, Lorenzo Sonego, Gregoire Barrere and Aljaz Bedene.

Donskoy overcame Matteo Viola 6-2 6-1 in St Petersburg but can expect a far sterner test against world number four and fellow Russian Medvedev in the second round.

Andrey Rublev rallied from a set down and then a break down in the third to triumph 4-6 6-0 6-4 against Ilya Ivashka. Ricardas Berankis awaits him after overcoming Dudi Sela 6-3 6-0 in 62 minutes.

Roberto Carballes Baena downed 2012 champion Martin Klizan 6-2 7-5, while Egor Gerasimov beat Lukas Rosol 7-5 6-2 and Janko Tipsarevic retired while 7-5 3-6 3-1 down to Damir Dzumhur.

Roger Federer has planned his schedule up until next year's Wimbledon and within a month intends to make a decision on playing at the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

Olympic singles gold is the only major title to have evaded Federer during his illustrious career, having gone closest when he lost in the final to Andy Murray at London 2012.

The 20-time major champion triumphed in the men's doubles alongside Stan Wawrinka four years prior in Beijing, but he was forced to sit out Rio 2016 due to a knee injury.

Federer is hopeful of having another shot at Olympic singles success but for now is only looking as far ahead as next year's Wimbledon.

"I'm very excited about the prospect of maybe playing the Olympic Games, but I'm not quite sure yet," said Federer, who is in Geneva ahead of the Laver Cup.

"My planning goes until Wimbledon next year which is a couple of weeks before the Olympics, so I guess I'm going to be deciding on the Olympic Games in the next few weeks, hopefully the next month or so.

"It's been such a special event for me over the years. Me and my wife in 2000 carrying the flag in Athens and Beijing for the Swiss Olympic delegation which was a huge dream for me come true.

"Winning doubles gold with Stan Wawrinka in Beijing then getting the silver in London, at Wimbledon.

"So for me, maybe to be part of it again would be great, especially after missing the last edition in Rio because of a knee injury, but I'll just have to see how my family is doing, how my body is doing, and then if everything is green and I really feel it's the right thing to do, I'll play it, otherwise I'll skip it but it would definitely be a nice challenge, I admit."

Federer played the clay-court season for the first time since 2016 this year and reached the semi-finals of the French Open, where he lost to eventual champion Rafael Nadal.

Asked if he will return to the red dirt in 2020, Federer said: "I have decided for myself, but must think about when I announce it."

Novak Djokovic remains unsure when he will return from a shoulder injury, but the world number one is eyeing a comeback in Tokyo.

Djokovic retired during a last-16 clash against Stan Wawrinka at the US Open at the start of the month and reports suggested he may need surgery.

The Serbian star is still uncertain as to when he will return, but said he would ideally play at the Japan Open Tennis Championships, an ATP 500 tournament that starts on September 30, as scheduled.

"I would like to tell you when I will be back, but I really do not know exactly. I monitor the results of rehabilitation every day. I monitor how the shoulder responds to recovery," Djokovic told RTS on Monday.

"Unfortunately, the injury was of a more serious nature. It prevented me from continuing the tournament in New York. I'm very sorry.

"It's one of the four biggest tournaments, especially important in the second part of the season."

Djokovic added: "I hope to be on the court in a week or two. For now, in an ideal scenario, the plan is to play Tokyo."

The 32-year-old said he expected to have greater clarity over his return in the next week.

Djokovic has enjoyed another fine season, winning two grand slam titles to take his tally to 16, trailing only Roger Federer (20) and Rafael Nadal (19).

Mikhail Kukushkin came through his first-round clash at the St Petersburg Open, but former Moselle Open champion Peter Gojowczyk crashed out in Metz.

There were just two main-draw matches in Russia on Monday, with seeds Kukushkin and Adrian Mannarino progressing.

Kukushkin won the tournament in 2010 for his first and only ATP Tour title to date, and the sixth seed had too much for Jannik Sinner in their opener, advancing 6-3 7-6 (7-4).

Meanwhile, Mannarino, the seventh seed, eased past Stefano Travaglia 7-5 6-2.

At the Moselle Open, however, the one-time winner in action was not able to reach the second round, with Gojowczyk undone by Filip Krajinovic.

Gojowczyk beat Benoit Paire in the 2017 final but went down 7-5 6-4 on Monday.

Fernando Verdasco has struggled for form in recent months - winning twice since Wimbledon - but got the better of Steve Darcis 6-2 6-2, while Frenchman Antoine Hoang defeated Cedrik-Marcel Stebe.

Former world number one Andy Murray said he would love to play Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer before they retire, but only if he is capable of beating the 'Big Three'.

Murray looked set to retire following January's Australian Open, however, the three-time grand slam champion is on the comeback trail after hip resurfacing surgery.

The 32-year-old – who dropped down to ATP Challenger level to take part in the Rafael Nadal Open having skipped the US Open – is set to feature at the Shanghai Masters after accepting a wildcard.

Murray will spend a couple of weeks in the Far East, competing in the Zhuhai Championships and China Open as he eyes next year's Australian Open following a brief ATP Tour singles return in August.

Asked about renewing his battle with Djokovic, Nadal and Federer, Murray – who has played doubles this year to build his fitness – said: "I look forward to doing it if, physically, I am capable of competing with them.

"I don't look forward to going on the court against one of those guys and not feeling like I have a chance of winning which, if I played them tomorrow, that's how I would feel.

"When I practised with Novak in Australia at the beginning of this year, I found that hard, even though it was just practice. I felt terrible and I found that quite hard.

"If I'm able to compete against them and feel like I can win, even if it's a really small chance, then I will enjoy that, for sure. But, not feeling like I can be competitive and getting pumped, I probably wouldn't enjoy that."

Murray – now ranked 415 in the world – added: "I need matches just now. My body needs to build up some level of robustness. That's the reason for entering the [four straight] tournaments.

"And if I'm not getting matches [because of early defeats in each event] I'm at least around, practising with top players, getting my body more used to the speed and things."

Andy Murray has taken a wildcard for the Shanghai Masters as the former world number one continues his comeback from hip surgery.

After working his way back to fitness by playing doubles, Murray made a short-lived return to ATP singles action in August, losing to Richard Gasquet in Cincinnati before Tennys Sandgren defeated him at the Winston-Salem Open.

Murray skipped the US Open, dropping to Challenger level and taking part in the Rafa Nadal Open in Mallorca, recording two victories before going out in round three.

Having already confirmed he would take part in the Zhuhai Championships and the China Open in September, Murray will now play in the Far East for three weeks, with the Shanghai Masters beginning on October 6.

Murray - a three-time grand slam champion - initially looked set to retire after the Australian Open in January, though surgery has resolved a long-standing hip issue.

The 32-year-old is currently at 415 in the ATP world rankings.

As first Novak Djokovic and then Roger Federer exited the US Open, leaving the draw wide open for Rafael Nadal, there was legitimate cause for concern the men's singles final would be what it was for the previous two years: a forgettable, one-sided encounter far from befitting of the occasion.

Nadal and Djokovic ran roughshod over Kevin Anderson and Juan Martin del Potro in 2017 and 2018 respectively, with neither able to provide enough of a test to produce a spectacle worthy of being retained in the memory for too long.

To watch Nadal, Djokovic and Federer overwhelm an opponent is a sight to behold. The sporting soliloquies they frequently deliver against those outside their ceaselessly dominant trident are regularly compelling simply for the mastery they display when brushing aside inferior foes.

However, grand slam finals are not the stage for such one-man shows. In this arena more than any other, two protagonists are needed for the headline act to live up to the billing.

On Sunday, Nadal was lucky enough to share the Arthur Ashe court with the tournament's chief protagonist, and he and Daniil Medvedev combined to produce a four-hour-and-49-minute drama that nobody who was lucky enough to have a seat in the stadium will forget in a hurry.

It seemed extremely unlikely that Medvedev - the man who became the leading storyline of an often drab men's tournament after aiming a middle-finger gesture towards the crowd in a third-round clash with Feliciano Lopez - would be able to provide the thrilling final-day flourish those packed inside the world's largest tennis stadium witnessed when Nadal took control of his 27th major final.

Medvedev himself conceded he was thinking about giving a speech after Nadal broke in the third set to take a 3-2 lead. However, he has consistently proven capable of finding inspiration from unexpected sources and at unexpected times.

He masterfully used the jeers of spectators to his advantage against Lopez and in the fourth round with Dominik Koepfer, goading the fans after matches while focusing on transforming their negative energy into a positive.

In his quarter-final with Stan Wawrinka he superbly switched his tactics to exhaust the Swiss by getting him on the run with drop shots and lobs, finding a way to survive and advance having been in a dire situation as a thigh injury left him believing retirement or defeat was inevitable.

Medvedev felt the latter was a formality as Nadal moved through the gears in the final, but once again he discovered life when it looked least likely to arrive.

"I was like, 'Okay, okay, just fight for every point, don't think about these things.' It worked out not bad," said the Russian.

It worked out significantly better than not bad. Medvedev's desire, excellent movement on the baseline and ability to put so many balls back in play led to uncharacteristic errors from Nadal that saw him surrender the initiative, setting in motion a recovery nobody foresaw but one suddenly everybody except those in the Nadal camp desperately wanted.

A dramatic twist worthy of Broadway turned everything on its head, including the crowd, who shockingly swayed to the man they once loathed as they chanted Medvedev's name, making clear their desire to see the match extended into a fourth set.

Medvedev obliged and, with renewed belief, ploughed on in search of one of the greatest comebacks in grand slam history, which looked a very real possibility when he met a 107mph Nadal serve out wide with a perfectly placed two-handed backhand winner to force a decider.

His extraordinary revival made for an astonishing spectacle as it led to a gripping, undulating conclusion in which crowd support swung one way and then the other as both players somehow summoned the energy to deliver the finale this captivating contest deserved.

Medvedev had three break points in the second game of the fifth but could take none of them, Nadal finding depth and accuracy off both wings, and it was the Spaniard who just about proved to have more in the tank, surging into – and then almost losing – a 5-2 lead.

Nadal withstood a final show of Medvedev character and a break point that would have levelled the match once more and immediately fell flat on his back when an overhit forehand return secured a 7-5 6-3 5-7 4-6 6-4 success and his fourth US Open title, with the now 19-time major champion quick to acknowledge the 23-year-old's part in making this one of his most emotional triumphs.

"Daniil created this moment, too. The way that he fought, the way that he played, it's a champion way. I really believe that he will have many more chances," said Nadal at his media conference.

"These kind of matches in the final of grand slams makes the match more special. The way that the match became very dramatic at the end, that makes this day unforgettable."

Medvedev will take little solace in his incredible role in a losing cause. The story of the 2019 US Open men's singles will always end with Nadal tearfully clutching the trophy, but it is a tale that will not be able to be told without recalling how Medvedev made it one worth listening to, and how he ultimately saved the final slam of the year from being another anti-climax.

Remember when Rafael Nadal was "finished"?

Without a grand slam title in nearly three years, a wrist injury plaguing his career and ongoing questions over his knee?

That was three years ago and feels more like a lifetime.

Since the start of 2017, Nadal has won five grand slams, the most recent of which was the US Open after an epic five-set victory over Daniil Medvedev in the final in New York on Sunday.

The Spanish great is up to 19 grand slam titles, just one shy of all-time men's record holder Roger Federer, while he pushed three clear of Novak Djokovic.

There was, perhaps rightly, a theory that Federer would have the best longevity of the 'Big Three', his style less reliant on the physicality of Nadal and Djokovic, whose relentlessness and gruelling approach from the baseline led to those suggestions.

But that has thus far proven to be wrong, and it is remarkably Nadal – with a remodelled serve helping his hard-court game this year – who has seriously starred since turning 30.

Federer turned 30 in August 2011, Nadal in June 2016 and Djokovic in May 2017.

In their 30s, Nadal has won five majors compared to four apiece for Federer and Djokovic, a tally few would have predicted and one that seems set to grow.

A battered body looked set to get the better of Nadal, but instead the majors in 2019 have belonged to him.

He finished with two grand slam titles and a 24-2 win-loss record – his best since going an extraordinary 25-1 in 2010.

At 33, there are some signs Nadal may be slowing down, and he unsurprisingly looked tired at times in the incredible clash with Medvedev that lasted almost five hours.

But he is showing he could be the king in the 30s of the 'Big Three', and he sure as anything is not finished yet.

At the end of his third-round match with Feliciano Lopez, Daniil Medvedev's relationship with the US Open fans seemed fractured beyond repair.

Hearing the boos that provided the soundtrack to his post-match on-court interview at Louis Armstrong Stadium after he had directed a middle-finger gesture at the fans following a disagreement with the umpire, it was impossible to believe Medvedev would be talking about leaving his heart out there for the New York crowd.

Yet that is what the Russian felt he had to do as he battled back from two sets down in a captivating five-set defeat to Rafael Nadal in the US Open final.

Medvedev seemed dead and buried in the match when he trailed 3-2 in the third having gone a break down.

The 23-year-old looked a spent force, but immediately responded and fought back magnificently. His name rang round Arthur Ashe Stadium as he recovered to win the third set, and a frenetic thrill ride of a final then swung dramatically in his direction as a punishing return gave him the decisive break in the fourth.

Nadal returned to being the crowd favourite as an enthralling match moved towards a nail-biting conclusion, with Medvedev unable to take advantage of break points at 1-1 and as the Spaniard served out the match.

Though he ultimately fell short in attempting to erase a 5-2 deficit in the decider, Medvedev's incredible effort and fighting spirit saw him definitively win back the affections of the Flushing Meadows public.

Speaking after his 7-5 6-3 5-7 4-6 6-4 loss, Medvedev was asked if he could have imagined having his name chanted by the crowd last week.

He replied: "I was being myself. I was fighting for every point. I think they appreciated it. Being break down in the third, I won the game, and I felt that these guys wanted some more tennis. They were cheering me up like crazy.

"I knew I had to leave my heart out there for them also. For myself first of all, but for them also. I think they saw it and they appreciate it. I'm thankful to them for this.

"The only thing going through my mind at this moment was I have to win next point, I have to win next game. I was not thinking too much, 'Okay, I'm from Russia, I'm in USA, they are cheering my name, what should I do?' No.

"It was a pleasure to be out there tonight. They were sometimes cheering my name, sometimes they were going for Rafa. I think it was just because the arena is so huge, there were so many people cheering both names, it was like changing all the time. I don't think it will be same people cheering two different names from one point to another.

"The atmosphere was the best of my life, I have to say."

Medvedev demonstrated incredible levels of endurance during his four hours, 49 minutes on court.

Asked if he could see himself competing at the same level at 33 years old, as Nadal continues to do, Medvedev said: "I do see myself at 33 years running and competing like Rafael Nadal.

"Although Rafa said it himself, that he changed his game a lot from younger age to be able to compete at the highest level. Maybe I'll have to do the same. This I cannot know."

© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.