Salazar-trained British athletes face UKAD scrutiny

By Sports Desk November 05, 2019

UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) says it will review whether any action is required against British athletes who were trained by the now banned coach Alberto Salazar.

The organisation released a statement on Tuesday after the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) announced that it would investigate Salazar's former pupils.

Salazar was banned from coaching during the World Athletics Championships in Doha, after he – along with Dr Jeffrey Brown – was found guilty of possessing and trafficking banned substances after a four-year investigation by the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

The verdict preceded Salazar's Nike Oregon Project being shut down, though the 61-year-old stated he will appeal his four-year ban.

Farah, who Salazar helped become the most successful British track athlete in modern Olympic Games history, claimed in October that there was an "agenda" against him after he was questioned over his former coach's actions.

But he will be one of the athletes to come under the spotlight of UKAD's review.

"We have been working with USADA on their investigation into the Nike Oregon Project and will work with WADA on their investigation if there is any evidence that relates to athletes or athlete support personnel under our jurisdiction," UKAD chief executive Nicole Sapstead said in a statement.

"We are reviewing the decision regarding Alberto Salazar to determine if there is any action we may wish to take as a national anti-doping organisation."

Farah has always maintained his innocence and has not been found guilty of any wrongdoing. 

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