Jamaica distance runner Kemoy Campbell seems to have set his sights on a return to the track, just over two weeks after collapsing during a race at the Millrose Games in New York.

The 28-year-old athlete will, however, plans to compete with the help of an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), a device that will restart his heart should it stop suddenly again.  Campbell collapsed during the men's 3000 metres race in early February and had to be revived with the use of CPR and a defibrillator after trackside medical staff treated him for minutes.

The athlete confirmed, via his Instagram account on Saturday, that subsequent tests had failed to discover a reason for the illness, but seemed to suggest he had every intention to return to the track.

“After multiple vials of blood, ECHOs, EKGs, ultrasounds, MRI, CAT scan, PET scan, and heart biopsy.  The weeks of testing resulted in no diagnosis for the cause of my heart stopping.

‘On Monday I will be putting an ICD in my body (left side of my ribs).  This device will shock my heart back into rhythm if this is to happen again.  I was told that I would have to take a few months off from running.  After those months I could start getting back at it slowly with permission from the cardiologist.”

Jamaican distance runner Kemoy Campbell has revealed that his heart had stopped on Saturday when he collapsed at the NYRR Millrose Games.

The gofundme campaign launched by the family of Jamaican 3000m runner Kemoy Campbell got a major boost on Tuesday when the president of Reebok announced a US$50,000 donation towards the athlete’s medical expenses.

Campbell, who turned 28 in January, collapsed during the 3000m at the Millrose Games in New York on Saturday.

Paramedics spent about 20 minutes reviving him before taking him to the New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Hospital where he was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). He was into a medically induced coma while doctors treated him.

On Tuesday, his family released a statement that Campbell had awakened and was speaking but was unable to recall anything about the incident that had captured global attention. They also announced that they had launched a campaign to raise funds to cover his medical expenses.

In response, Matt O’Toole President of Reebok issued a statement to Sports Illustrated in which he said that sportswear company would be donating US$50,000 towards the athlete’s medical expenses.

“Kemoy is an important part of the Reebok family, and we are so happy to hear that he is making great progress,” O’Toole said in the statement.

“As part of our family, we will stand behind him and support him in his recovery. We are making a contribution of $50,000 to help with his medical expenses.”

The Jamaican government, through its Sports Development Foundation (SDF), has also announced that they will also be contributing to Campbell's medical expenses. His family is trying to raise approximately US$100,000.

In August 2017, Campbell became the first Jamaican male distance runner to qualify for the final at the IAAF World Championships. He finished 10th in a time of 13:39.74.

 

 

Jamaica’s Natoya Goule believes it was natural speed and strength work done in the preseason that propelled her to a national indoor 800m record at the Millrose Games in New York on Saturday.

Jamaican distance runner Kemoy Campbell remains hospitalised after collapsing while competing at the Millrose Games in New York on Saturday.

Campbell's family issued a statement on Monday, via his agent Ray Flynn. In the statement, the family revealed that "Kemoy's condition has not changed much.

"He is still sedated so that his body can rest," the family said, adding "the doctors are some of the best in the world and are keeping us constantly updated."

The family also thanked well wishers for their words of comfort.

Running in the Dr Sander Men’s 3000 metres, Campbell had gone out hard and was in second place when he began the sixth lap, but collapsed, with reports coming in that he suffered respiratory problems during the race.

Campbell was treated by medical personnel at trackside before being taken to hospital where his condition is unknown.

The race was eventually won by the United States and Standford University’s Grant Fisher in 7:42.62 seconds.

Australia’s Morgan McDonald was second in 7:42.76 while Kenya’s Amon Kemboi was third in 7:44.77 seconds.

Trinidad and Tobago sprinter, Michelle Lee Ahye, clocked a season’s best in the women’s 60m to close her indoor season at the Millrose Games in New York on Saturday.

Ahye clocked 7.15, which was good enough for second place behind a resurgent English Gardner of the United States.  Gardner got off to a good start and powered to the line in 7.10, which was a new personal best and the second fastest time in the world this year.  The American is looking to get back to her best after two ACL surgeries.

For Ahye, the result beat her previous best time of 7.21 set at the New Balance Indoor Grand Prix last month but obviously did not come with the gold medal the Trinidadian won on that occasion.

 On Saturday, Javianne Oliver, another American, was third behind Ahye with a time of 7.19.

Ahye, the 2018 Commonwealth Games champion, is the fastest Caribbean woman over the distance this year.  The next closest of Jamaica’s Remona Burchell who has a best of 7.23 set in Poland earlier this month.  The fastest time recorded over the distance this year was set by Poland’s Ewa Swoboda who recorded 7.08 in Karlsruhe Germany earlier this month

  

Jamaican distance runner, Kemoy Campbell, had to be taken to hospital after the athlete collapsed at the Millrose games in New York on Saturday. 

Despite racing to a National 800 metres Indoor record at the Millrose Games at the New Balance Track and Field Center in New York, Jamaica’s Natoya Goule found herself second best. 

© 2018 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.