Making it to Tokyo Olympics would be a huge deal for confident Kemba Nelson

By April 07, 2021

Jamaica’s Kemba Nelson has designs on being in Tokyo for the Olympic Games this summer and based on what she has done so far at the University of Oregon she believes she has a good shot at it.

Nelson, who opened her outdoor season with a wind-aided 22.78 in late March, was impressive indoors where she won the 60m title at the NCAA National Indoor Championships a couple of weeks earlier. Her time of 7.05 was a personal best for the Jamaican, who also set a facility record with the run.

She told Sportsmax.TV that the win was a real boost to her confidence as she headed outdoors. That confidence, she said, has her believing that making the Jamaican team to Tokyo, a real possibility.

“Making the Olympic team would be a huge deal for me and once I’m in the condition to do so I definitely intend to,” she said, indicating that she is not in the least intimidated by the depth of Jamaica’s women sprinting talent.

With the likes of Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce, Elaine Thompson, Briana Williams, Jonielle Smith, Natalliah Whyte and Kiara Grant to contend with, making the cut will not be easy. However, Nelson said she plans to focus on her and not who is around her.

“I’d like to think I have as good a chance as anyone,” she said.

“I don’t make it a habit to pay attention to my competition but I have a great deal of respect for everyone trying to make the team. I am just planning to do my best.”

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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