Jamaican hurdler rebounds from long-term injury with 300m hurdles win in Georgia

By July 28, 2020

Rebounding from a year when she was plagued by injury Jamaican 400-metre hurdler made a triumphant return to the track on the weekend, winning the rarely run 300-metre hurdles at the American Track League meeting at Life University in Marietta, Georgia.

Nugent clocked 39.81 to establish what is believed to be a Jamaican national record for the event. Her coach Lennox Graham was just grateful that she was well enough to run.

“She has been progressing well. Her foot issues, which prevented her attending practices for much of last year, have greatly improved,” he said.

“With the forced shutdown in late March she got some more time to focus even more on rehab - she was away from any training for about 7-8 weeks.  So, I feel good about her current performance considering less than ideal preparations.”

Nugent at finalist at the 2017 World Championships in London was happy for the victory.

“Thankful for the big and little victories,” she posted on Instagram.

“Our plan was to just shake off the rust after being out with injuries last year. I didn’t know I broke the Jamaican national 300m hurdles record too! I’m so grateful for a little glimmer of hope in the world right now.”

Nugent was not the only Jamaican winner on Saturday as national 800m champion Natoya Goule was also victorious in the two-lap event.

With just one other competitor in the race, Goule cruised to victory in 2:00.43 and said afterwards that under the circumstances, she was satisfied with the performance.

“At first I wasn’t satisfied because I know I can run faster, but when I look on the face of it that I’m not in race shape and it is my first outdoor race I am satisfied,” she said.

“I’ve always opened up with two minutes outdoors and during the season I would get faster so I am satisfied considering that I took time off then started back up again during the lockdown. I know if I was able to compete like the norm, I would have run a good time even though I was running by myself.”

Laurie Barton was a distant second in 2:05.72.

Danielle Williams, the 2019 World Championship bronze medallist won the 100 hurdles in 13.23.

 

Leighton Levy

Leighton Levy is a journalist with 28 years’ experience covering crime, entertainment, and sports. He joined the staff at SportsMax.TV as a content editor two years ago and is enjoying the experience of developing sports content and new ideas. At SportsMax.tv he is pursuing his true passion - sports.

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