Ricketts encouraged by consistency

By Sports Desk September 01, 2019
Jamaica's Shanieka Rickett's Jamaica's Shanieka Rickett's

Jamaica triple jumper Shanieka Ricketts contends she is encouraged by the consistency of recent performances, after claiming the women’s title at the ISTAF Berlin World Challenge Meeting, in Germany on Sunday.

Fresh off claiming the Diamond League title with a leap just under 15m, Ricketts cleared 14.63m to take top spot in the women’s triple jump in Berlin.  Patricia Mamona of Portugal claimed second place with a leap of 14.18 and Dovile Kilty of Lithuania placed third with a leap of 14.15.   Kimberly Williams, the other Jamaican in the event, finished 5th with a leap of 13.96m.

“I feel great. My best jump was 14.63m, that shows that I have a lot of consistency,” Ricketts said.

“This was my final rehearsal for Doha. Achieving such a result after the DL final a few days ago is great, incredible. I was hoping to jump further, but we had a negative breeze (wind), and I was tired from the DL final. I really like it here, the crowd was electric and gave us a lot of support,” she added.

In another result, Danniel Thomas-Dodd threw 18.02m for 4th in the women’s shot put. Canadian Brittany Crew won the event with 19.28m.

Related items

  • 'A walk in the park' - Powell confident of reaching 100 sub-10 clockings 'A walk in the park' - Powell confident of reaching 100 sub-10 clockings

    Former world record holder Asafa Powell is confident he will get to the elusive target of 100 sub-10 clockings sometime in the coming season, despite insisting that it is not necessarily a primary focus.

    Powell, who set the world record twice, first in 2005 (9.77) before lowering the mark in 2007 (9.74), has the most sub-10 clockings in history with 97.  The 37-year-old has, however, been hampered by injury in recent years and has struggled to dip below the mark in recent years.

    The runner has not managed to go below the mark since 2016, when he clocked 9.92.  With a solid preseason behind him, however, Powell feels he is ready to get back to his best form and achieving the target is well within his grasp.

    “Based on how training has been going this year I expect it to be a walk in the park,” Powell said of getting to 100 sub-10 clockings.

    “I’m not really focusing on that it will come naturally.  I’m focused on going to the national trials where you have to go sub-10 and on the Diamond League circuit you have to go sub-10, so I’m not focusing on it,” he said.

    “I’m just taking it step by step and making sure I stay healthy.”

  • 'I'm feeling fast as ever' - former world record holder Powell rejects 'old guy' label 'I'm feeling fast as ever' - former world record holder Powell rejects 'old guy' label

    Former 100m record holder Asafa Powell has insisted he remains in great shape to compete despite being dismissed as an 'old guy' by a competitor at the Boston Indoor Grand Prix on Saturday.

    In his prime, Powell cast an enviable figure for many sprinters, his picture-perfect running style taking him to a world record time of 9.77 in 2005 and then lowering that mark with a time of 9.74 in 2007.  The Jamaican went on to clock the most sub-10 second times for any sprinter with a total of 98.

    In recent years, Powell, who has been plagued by injuries, has struggled to reach close to such heights.  On Saturday, the sprinter finished in 5th place in the men’s 60m, with a time of 6.71, expectedly well off his best of 6.44.  His efforts seemed to do little to impress United States sprinter Demek Kemp.  The 23-year-old South Carolina representative took the event in a personal best time of 6.50. 

    "Feels great," Kemp said of the run.

    "I had some good competition. Glad to have a personal record,” he added.

    He clearly did not feel Powell was among them, however.

    "He's an old guy," Kemp said when asked about competing against the Jamaican.

    For his part, Powell, who insisted the run was about testing his legs, however, claims he is feeling as good as ever and is confident he should still be competing.

    “I am still feeling very strong, still feeling as fast as I did years ago,” Powell told Track Alerts.

    “With the entire Jamaica is motivating me, and with that kind of support, it’s hard to give up,” he added.

     

  • 'Let us run' – Fraser-Pryce insists athletes must retire on own terms 'Let us run' – Fraser-Pryce insists athletes must retire on own terms

    Jamaican sprint superstar Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce insists athletes should retire on their own terms not feel pressure to step aside due to factors like aging.

    With sprinting and sports in general often considered the domain of younger athlete, Fraser-Pryce became one of several current stars willing to buck that trend after capturing gold at the Doha World Championships last year.  In the process, she became the oldest woman to ever win 100m gold at a global championship.  The 33-year-old also became the only sprinter to be crowned world champion over the 100m four times (2009, 2013, 2015 and 2019) and the first woman to hold dual world and Olympic titles on two separate occasions.

    With 10-years having passed since she made her debut as a 21-year-old at the 2008 Olympic Games, her achievements are as much a testament to her longevity as much as it is to her talent.

    “The last time I won this award was 2015 and to be here over a decade later still representing the unique legacy that we have here for Jamaica in sprinting and athletics is a huge honour,” Fraser-Pryce said.

    “I hope that with this award a lot more athletes can understand that there is so much more to us as athletes and so much more to give.  You decide when its time to go,” she added.

    Fraser-Pryce registered another milestone two years ago when she took time off from the sport to have her first child.

     

© 2020 SportsMaxTV All Rights Reserved.